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Complete Course Catalog

Class ID Name Description Credits
ACCT 2400 Principles of Accounting I Prerequisite MATH 1100. This introductory course covers the accounting cycle for a proprietorship. Balance sheet items are covered in detail. The theory of accrual based accounting and GAAP are detailed. The preparation of financial statements is explained. A special project and presentation involving GAAP will be required for MBA students taking this course. 3
ACCT 2500 Principles of Accounting II Prerequisite ACCT 2400. This course is a continuation of ACCT 2400. Topics covered include accounting for partnerships and corporations, bonds, stock investment, consolidations, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, introduction to management accounting. MBA students will be required to make a presentation on a financial accounting topic. 3
ACCT 3100 Legal Environment of Business I An introduction to the American legal and judicial system with an emphasis on the study of law as it relates to legal rights and social forces, government, business and society. 3
ACCT 3120 Legal Environment of Business II Prerequisite ACCT 3100. In depth analysis and application of the rules of law to business transactions. The student is assisted in developing the skills needed to identify legal issues and to apply the rules of law found in court decisions and statutes to forecast the probable outcome of legal controversies. 3
ACCT 3600 Intermediate Accounting I Prerequisite ACCT 2500. A detailed study of theory, concepts, and methodologies underlying the preparation of the income statement, cash flow statement, and the statement of financial position. Emphasis is placed on the conceptual framework of financial accounting. Course materials focus on income measurement, valuation, and reporting issues related to assets and current and long-term assets. 3
ACCT 3620 Intermediate Accounting II Prerequisite ACCT 3600. This is a followup course to Intermediate Accounting I. This course focuses on income measurements, valuation and reporting issues related to intangibles, current and long-term liabilities, bonds payable, pensions, leases, and taxes. 3
ACCT 3630 Accounting Information Systems Prerequisites CIS 1100 and ACCT 2500. This course focuses on the set of problems associated with the design and operation of information systems necessary to support the overall planning of an organizations control system. 3
ACCT 4110 Cost Accounting Prerequisite ACCT 2500. A study of cost accounting systems or planning, control, and decision making. Topics covered job costing, process costing, budgeting, standard costing, relevant costing, cost volume profit analysis, and transfer pricing. Just-in-time production and activity based costing systems are also introduced in the course. 3
ACCT 4220 Governmental Accounting Prerequisite ACCT 2500. This course is designed for the accounting major who desires a career in governmental and other nonprofit institutions. Topics will include funds, budgets, appropriations, and allotments. 3
ACCT 4300 Advanced Accounting Prerequisite ACCT 3620. Advanced accounting provides the student an in depth study of accounting problems involved in partnerships, installment sales, consignments, branches, mergers and consolidations, receiverships, fiduciaries, and foreign currency translations. 3
ACCT 4320 Auditing Prerequisite ACCT 3620. This course is designed for the student who is planning a career in public accounting. It involves a study of the fundamental techniques and procedures used in the verification of accounting records and in the preparation of an audit report 404 with emphasis on internal control and risk management. 3
ACCT 4400 Introduction to Federal Taxation Prerequisite ACCT 2500. This course involves a study of income tax laws for the United States. Students study income tax theory for the individual taxpayer. 3
ACCT 4420 International Accounting Prerequisite ACCT 2500. This course is designed to expose the student to the accounting functions in other countries. Environmental factors which influence the development of accounting will be examined. The course will also focus on the preparations and interpretation of accounting reports. 3
ACCT 4720 Corporate and Partnership Tax Prerequisite ACCT 4400. This course involves a study of Income tax laws of the United States as they affect Corporations and partnerships. Introduction to tax research And the preparation of a computerized tax return are included. 3
ACCT 5510 Managerial Accounting The course is concerned with the study and application of accounting concepts in relation to planning and control of business operations. Quantitative techniques and behavioral impact of accounting systems will be included. 3
ART 1000 Introduction to the Study of Art An introduction to art appreciation and major styles, artists and art monuments. An overview of these areas will include what constitutes a work of art: content, style and medium. 2
ART 1200 African-American Art History An illustrated lecture/discussion survey of African-American visual arts from anonymous artisans of colonial days to the present. 3
ART 1500 Survey of the History of Art Art majors only. A selective survey of major stylistic developments in art history, from the beginning of art through the modern era. The criteria for producing written analysis of a work of art is emphasized. 3
ART 2010 Ancient Art Prerequisite: ART 1500 or Hum 2410 and 2420. The study of art from prehistoric, ancient Egyptian, and Near Eastern to Greek and Roman epochs, including selected works from the interiors of the African and Asian continents. 3
ART 2020 Medieval Art Prerequisite: ART 1500 or Hum 2410 and 2420. The study of art from the Middle Ages including early Christian times through Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic periods, including selected works of Islamic, Oriental, Mesa- American and African art. 3
ART 2300 Basic Design 2
ART 3010 Renaissance Art Prerequisite: ART 1500, or HUM 2410 and 2420. The study of painting, sculpture and architecture in Europe, from its origins in the 14th century through the Baroque period, including the infuences of other cultures. Fall only. 3
ART 3020 Modern Art Prerequisite: ART 1500, or HUM 2410 and 2420. The study of modern art from the early 18th century in Europe to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in Europe and America including current global influences. Spring only. 3
ARTE 2610 Art Education I Art majors only or by permission of instructor. This course explores the recommended practices in qualitative curriculum planning in art education for kindergarten through sixth grade levels. Laboratory experiences will assist students in identifying the unique problems of the elementary school child. 3
ARTE 3610 Art Education II Prerequisites: ARTF 2110, 2120. This course explores the recommended practices in qualitative curriculum planning in art for sixth through twelfth grade levels with laboratory experiences. 3
ARTE 3710 Crafts I An exploration of materials and techniques within the craft media. Consideration of the visual elements and principles of design will be developed as they relate to both two and three-dimensional work. Emphasis on the development of visual perception and the expression of personal ideas, images and craftsmanship. Fall/Spring. 3
ARTE 3720 Crafts II Prerequisites: ARTE 3710. A continuation of ARTE 3710. Students will increase their skills and competencies. Students are expected to work independently and to propose their own projects. 3
ARTE 4101 Materials and Methods in Art This course is designed to provide students with a general knowledge of various aspects of instruction and learning in preparation for teaching art in the public schools, i.e., teaching and learning theory; effective methodology; the selection, preparation, organization, and scheduling of course content; classroom management; motivation, discipline, evaluation, and working with others. 3
ARTE 4201 Directed Teaching - Art Directed teaching in the senior year provides the opportunity for student teaching under supervision. A grade point average of 2.6 or above in the field in which certification is sought, and with approval of the School of Education. 6
ARTE 4610 Art Education III A study of the historical development and philosophies in art education in the United States and the art education curriculum in the public school for levels K-12. 3
ARTF 2110 Drawing I An introduction to the process, materials, and ideas of drawing with emphasis on composition. Students will work from observation. Six studio hours per week. 3
ARTF 2120 Drawing II Prerequisite: ARTF 2110. A continuation of Drawing I. Six studio hours per week. 3
ARTF 2310 Color and Design An introduction to the rules and practice of two dimensional design. Composition is emphasized in studio exercises which expose the student to the visual elements and principles of design. Six studio hours per week. Fall only 3
ARTF 2320 3D Design Prerequisite: ARTF 2310. An introduction to design principles as applied to three dimensions. Six studio hours per week. Spring only. 3
ARTF 3100 Figure Drawing I Prerequisite ARTF 2120. A study of the human figure from the model. Six studio hours per week. Fall/Spring 3
ARTF 3140 Drawing IV Prerequisite: ARTF 3100. A continuation of the study of the human figure. Six studio hours per week. Fall/Spring. 3
ARTF 3210 Painting I Prerequisite: ARTF 2120, 2310. An introduction to the skills and conceptual abilities required to successfully control the formal elements of painting: color, form, and space. Six studio hours per week. Fall/Spring. 3
ARTF 3220 Painting II Prerequisite: ARTF 3210. A continuation of the exploration of formal painting issues. Six studio hours. Fall/Spring. 3
ARTF 3410 Ceramics I An introduction to vessel making with emphasis on coiling and slab building techniques. Basic procedures and concepts for glazing and firing will be discussed. Six studio hours per week. Non-art majors may enroll. Fall/Spring. 3
ARTF 3420 Ceramics II A studio experience which explores wheel forming techniques and concepts that involve skill development, glaze application and basic high-fire procedures. May be repeated for credit. Six studio hours per week. Non-art majors may enroll. Fall/Spring. 3
ARTF 3510 Sculpture I Prerequisite: ARTF 2320. An investigation of materials, styles, and methods in sculpture. Six studio hours per week. Spring only. 3
ARTF 3520 Sculpture II Prerequisite: ARTF 3510. A continuation of ARTF 3510. Six studio hours per week. Spring only. 3
ARTF 3980 Independent Study in Art Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in art and by consent of instructor. This course provides an opportunity for individual in-depth study of any aspect of studio art, art education, or visual communications. 3
ARTF 4010 Introduction to Museum Studies Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing in art and by consent of the instructor. A study of the basic theories and techniques of museum work through lectures and involvement in museum experiences at the University’s museum, including field trips to area museums. 3
ARTF 4100 Art Study Tours This course will expose students to the art and culture of other countries by traveling outside the U.S. 3
ARTF 4200 Painting III Prerequisite: ARTF 3220. A continuation of ARTF 3220. Students will make independent decisions regarding subject matter, palette, and media. 3
ARTF 4310 Printmaking I Prerequisite: ARTF 2110, 2310. An introduction to serigraphy and relief printing. Six studio hours per week. Fall Only. 3
ARTF 4320 Printmaking II Prerequisite: ARTF 4310. A continuation of ARTF 4310 with an introduction to etching and lithography. Six studio hours per week. Spring only. 3
ARTF 4500 Sculpture III Prerequisite: ARTF 3520. Continuation of ARTF 3520 with further exploration of materials and methods. 3
ARTF 4900 Advanced Studio An open studio for advanced study in one of the specialized areas of art: drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics and visual communications. By consent of the instructor. 3
ARTV 2150 Computer Graphics I An inquiry into the fundamental concepts of computer graphics with emphasis on art and design. Keyboard experience is recommended. Art majors only or by consent of the instructor. 3
ARTV 2830 Typography Prerequisite: ARTF 2310. A review of typographic history and contemporary trends with emphasis on letterform design, terminology, computer typesetting, and compositional principles in working with text and display type. Six studio hours per week. Fall only. 3
ARTV 3150 Computer Graphics II Prerequisite: ARTV 2150. Using multiple software applications this course will address the development of a total graphic design. The course emphasizes advanced image-editing techniques using Adobe Photoshop. Adobe In Design and Macromedia Freehand will be used for file preparation and digital prepress. Spring Only. 3
ARTV 3800 Graphic Design Prerequisites: ARTV 2830. Art Majors Only. An introduction to the tools used in the creative process for visual communications. The focus is on investigating the relationship between word and image. Six studio hours per week. Spring only. 3
ARTV 3810 Advertising Design Prerequisite: ARTV 3800. The course examines the history of traditional advertisements. Studio problems include comprehensive rendering, layout and design of advertisements. Preparation of mechanical art and type for reproduction processes is emphasized. Six studio hours per week. Fall only. 3
ARTV 3820 Advanced Design Prerequisite: ARTV 3810. A continuation of ARTV 3810. Spring only. 3
ARTV 3830 Type Design II Prerequisite: ARTV 2830. This is an advanced course to broaden the understanding of typography. Instruction includes the physical components of letters/words, and the rules of legibility and style for effective layouts. Students will explore how type enhances visual communications in a digital environment. Spring only. 3
ARTV 3850 Illustration I Prerequisite: ARTF 2120, 3100, and 3210. An exploration of the basic techniques, media, and concepts in producing an illustration. Fall only. 3
ARTV 3860 Illustration II Prerequisite: ARTV 3850. A continuation of ARTV 3850 with emphasis on problem solving and conceptual thinking. A major objective is the development of students’ illustrative skills and the ability to investigate problems confronting the graphic designer in the commercial environment. Spring only. 3
ARTV 4150 Web Design Prerequisite: ARTV 3150 This advanced course examines the organization and construction of web page design, internet access, and online interactive media. 4
ARTV 4820 Problems in Visual Communications Prerequisite: ARTV 3820. In-depth problem-solving projects as they relate to professional issues. Emphasis on concept and design. 3
ARTV 4840 Visual Communications Seminar Prerequisite: ARTV 4820. Continuation of ARTV 4820. Design projects at the senior level requiring utilization of graphic skills and images for commercial industry. 3
ARTV 4880 Internship in Art Prerequisite: ARTV 3820. Senior art majors or by consent of the advisor. This course is designed to provide the student with experience in graphic art professions. The student will be under close supervision of the internship director and trained agency personnel, and will receive clearly defned work projects. 3
BIOG 5120 Genetics 3
BIOG 5310 Cell Biology 3
BIOG 5410 Bioinfomatics 0
BIOG 5700 Graduate Seminar 1
BIOG 5800 Research in Biology With Thesis Research Advisor - Different Alternate classes may be taken depending upon semester 3
BIOG 5810 Biology Graduate Project 3
BIOG 5820 Research Laboratory Rotations 2
BIOG 5900 Biology Graduate Thesis 3
BIOL 1000 Heredity and Society Designed to introduce the student to the role of science, especially genetics, in seeking solutions to societal problems. Interdisciplinary in approach and does not require or assume any background in biology. 3
BIOL 1100 General Biology For students who are not biology majors and who will not be required to take upper-level courses in biology. The course covers an introduction to cellular biochemistry, a survey of the Plant, Monera, Protista and Animal Kingdoms, and a study of the systems of the human body. The laboratory consists of selected exercises which complement the lecture material. 3
BIOL 1101 General Biology I An introduction to the scientific method, a brief survey of the history of biology, an introduction to the physical and chemical properties of biological molecules, a survey of cellular structure and function, and an introduction to the basic principles of genetics. 4
BIOL 1201 General Biology II A survey of the kingdoms of living organisms, an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the systems of the vertebrate body, an introduction to evolutionary theory and the evidence of evolution, and an introduction to the fundamental principles of ecology. 4
BIOL 1300 Molecules and Cell Function An introduction to modern fundamental principles necessary for major training in the biological sciences. Basic physical and chemical properties of the major classes of biological molecules and their interactions and interrelationships with the organization and function of living cells are covered. This course cannot be used as an elective to satisfy requirements for a degree in biology. 4
BIOL 1610 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Prerequisite: BIOL 1300. An integrated, in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, including cells, tissues, integument, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and sense organs. This course cannot be used as an elective to satisfy requirements for a degree in biology. 4
BIOL 1620 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Prerequisite: BIOL 1610. A continuation of BIOL 1610 with special emphasis on cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, excretory, and reproductive systems and human development. This course cannot be used as an elective to satisfy requirements for a degree in biology. 3
BIOL 2020 Basic Neurobiology Prerequisites BIOL 2200. A study of the fundamental principles of the neuron and a general description of the nervous system. Students will learn the basics of brain structure and function 3
BIOL 2030 Special Studies in Biology Prerequisites and credit will depend on the topic covered. Specialized offerings that will provide majors, especially those in the first two years of study, and interested non-majors with opportunities for an introductory study of a single topic in biology. Topics may include selection and preparation for career opportunities in selected areas, exploration of a developing area of biology, or consideration of the political or social implications of an area of biology. 3
BIOL 2100 General Zoology Prerequisite: BIOL 2200. An introduction to the general principles of zoology based on the study of selected representatives of the major animal phyla; including an elucidation of how the basic functions of life, e.g., digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, information processing and reproduction, are accomplished in each phylum. 4
BIOL 2105 Introduction to Computational Science and Informatics An introduction to informatics, including data mining via the Internet, data warehousing, and skills required to present and publish data in an effective manner. The emerging area of bioinformatics and use of biological databases containing protein or nucleic acid sequences will be emphasized along with relevant software. The course also will familiarize students with construction and use of computational models to study problems of scientific interest. The necessary mathematical background as well as data acquisition, evaluation, management, and visualization/presentation methods will be covered. Students will design and complete their own computational projects using these skills. 3
BIOL 2200 Molecular Biology of Cells Prerequisites: BIOL 1101 and BIOL 1201. The third course for biology majors and persons who will be taking upper- level courses in biology. An in-depth study of the structure of cells, the physiology of cells, and molecular biology designed to convey basic knowledge about cells that will be needed as background for upper-level biology courses. 4
BIOL 2400 General Botany Prerequisite: BIOL 2200. An introduction to the distinguishing characteristics, morphogenesis, life processes, ecology, and economic value of selected representatives of the major plant groups. 4
BIOL 2600 Environmental Biology Prerequisite: BIOL 2200. A consideration of the interplay between the whole living organism and the environment. Emphasis will be placed on those topics that concern humans. Their modification of the environment and the effects of that environment on humans, with development of the concept of human beings as biological organisms and a part of the living world. 4
BIOL 2700 Environmental Problems An introduction to current problems in the environmental health sciences. five blocks are presented which deal with: (1) community health problems, (2) water quality, (3) air quality, (4) occupational health and safety, and (5) environmental microbiology. A sixth special problem block will deal with current research in environmental problems. 4
BIOL 3100 Genetics Prerequisites: BIOL 1101, 1201, and 2200. A study of the broad areas of Mendelian inheritance, linkage, sex- connected inheritance, multiple alleles, multiple genes, molecular genetics, mutation, population genetics, chromosomal aberrations, and application of genetics in agriculture, animal husbandry, and genetic counseling. The laboratory consists of research-oriented experiments, including breeding exercises with Drosophila, analysis of plant growth data, cytogenetics, induction of mutations, and investigation of a construction of human karyotypes and pedigrees genetic engineering. 4
BIOL 3200 General Microbiology Prerequisites: BIOL 1300 or 2200. A study of the morphological and physiological characteristics of bacteria, protozoa, and fungi. General principles of infection, microbial control, and immunity are also discussed. 4
BIOL 3300 Molecular Cell Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2200, CHEM 1100, and CHEM 1200 or consent of instructor. A thorough study of the eukaryotic cell, emphasizing molecular approaches to understanding cellular structure, organization, and function. Key topics in cell biology of contemporary and biomedical relevance will be covered, including the cell cycle, cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and cellular movement. Instruction will be inquiry-based, with extensive use of informational and instructional technology. 4
BIOL 3400 Ecology Advanced Standing. An introduction to the study of organisms in natural habitats with emphasis on growth of populations, the chemical role of organisms, energy flow through food chains and the development of ecological systems through geologic time. 3
BIOL 3430 Marine Biology Prerequisite: Advanced standing. A study of the physical environments of the oceans and the communities of animals, plants, and microorganisms living in salt water. Interactions between organisms, physiological adaptations of organisms, the impact of humans on oceans and their life, and the value of oceans to human life are emphasized. 3
BIOL 4000 Cell Physiology Prerequisites: BIOL 2200. A study of advanced concepts of cell ultrastructure and form-function together with examination of the strategies that have evolved in cells for carrying out the processes and functions of life, emphasizing the molecular basis of cellular activities and control mechanisms. 4
BIOL 4040 Senior Seminar Prerequisite: advanced standing. A course designed to teach students how to search the scientific literature and prepare an oral presentation on some current topic of research in biology. Students are required to attend all student presentations during the semester and may be required to attend departmental seminars. 1
BIOL 4100 Inquiries in Developmental Biology Prerequisite: Junior classification and consent of instructor. An exploration of contemporary research papers about the biology of development, as well as observations and experimentation of living organisms. 3
BIOL 4110 Vertebrate Histology Prerequisite: Advanced standing. A study of the basic mammalian tissues and their microscopic anatomy. Emphasis is placed on structural relationships between tissues and on the interstitial environment. 3
BIOL 4200 Introduction to Biostatistics Prerequisites: BIOL 2200, and MATH 1200, or consent of instructor. A practical study of the role of statistics in research; Principles and methods of statistical analysis and interpretation of data as applied to biological problems are covered. 3
BIOL 4300 Vertebrate Physiology Prerequisite: Advance standing. A study of the physiology of mammalian organ systems and their interrelationships. Emphasis is placed on membrane transport, body fluid chemistry, and hormonal control as related to organ metabolism and function. 3
BIOL 4310 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology Prerequisites: BIOL 3100 or BIOL 3200, CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200. A study of the physiology and anatomy of human organ systems with emphasis on the role of molecular and cellular biology in understanding metabolic function, inclusive of transmembrane potentials and receptor dynamics, along with the relationship between form and function. 4
BIOL 4350 Cancer Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2200 and BIOL 3100 or consent of instructor. A course focusing on the role of cells and genes in the development of cancer in humans. Course coverage will include examination of the role of specific genes such as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the development of cancer, treatments employed against cancer in the context of their specific cellular and molecular targets, and current topics in cancer such as the genetic diagnosis of cancer susceptibility through family and population studies. 3
BIOL 4400 Introduction to Research Prerequisite: consent of department and staff member under whom the work is to be done. A course designed to give the student an opportunity to undertake the selection and investigation of a limited; well-defined biological research project under the supervision of a member of the regular faculty. Course can be taken over more than one semester but a total of three credits are allowed. 3
BIOL 4500 Parasitology Prerequisite: Advanced standing or consent of instructor. A consideration of the fundamental principles governing animal parasites with emphasis on their taxonomy, biochemistry, morphology, development and life cycles, physiology and ecology. 3
BIOL 4510 Field Work in Environmental Studies Students may arrange to work in any of the following agencies for one semester: (1) municipal waterworks, (2) municipal refuse department, (3) municipal waste water, (4) governmental agencies (EPA, NIEHS, etc), (5) national or regional laboratories, or (6) museums. The student may conduct research in the field or gain on-the-job training for his/her professional development. 3
BIOL 4520 Field Work in Environmental Studies A continuation of BIOL 4510. 3
BIOL 4550 Techniques in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2200. An interdisciplinary course designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students who have an interest in understanding theory and application of techniques in biochemistry, advanced microscopy, and molecular biology. This course is a hands-on, research level course, which is taught solely in the laboratory. Students will learn how to develop hypothesis driven protocols, conduct experiments, collect data, analyze data, and predict follow-up steps for a given project. 4
BIOL 4610 Selected Topics in Biology Prerequisite: Advanced standing. Other prerequisites and credit will depend upon the topic. Selected topics that will provide majors opportunities for in-depth exploration of recent and actively developing areas of biology. Current primary literature sources related to the particular topic will form the content base for each offering. Student participation will include written and oral presentations and laboratory when appropriate for the topic. 3
BIOL 4620 Bioethics A cross-disciplinary field of science directed toward a deeper understanding of morality, truth, necessity, benefit and harm with respect to human responsibilities in medicine, healthcare, life sciences, and scientific research. The field is broad-based in the sciences with strong ties to ethical, social, spiritual, legal, and political values. 3
BIOL 4630 Seminar in Biotechnology Prerequisites: BIOL 3100 and 3200. A course designed for students to explore many of the new discoveries in biotechnology through reading of journals, on-line discoveries and through shared expertise of scientists from industrialized settings. Students will be required to attend seminars, summarize them and present a Power Point seminar. 1
BIOL 4650 Eukaryotic Microbiology Prerequisite: BIOL 2100, 2400 or consent of instructor. A discussion of the eukaryotic microbes of industry and disease in a seminar symposium format. Emphasis is given to the characteristics and ecology of the organisms and to their effect on human welfare as these are described in the current literature. 2
BIOL 4750 Biomedical Botany Prerequisite: BIOL 2400, CHEM 1300; or consent of instructor. A course designed primarily to acquaint the student with the fundamentals of plant diversity and the relation of plants to human affairs. Students will learn of the many direct and indirect ways that plants affect our lives medically. 3
BIOL 4850 Comparative Animal Physiology Prerequisite: BIOL 2100, CHEM 3010 or 3100. An in-depth study of functional similarities and differences of genetically dissimilar organisms ranging from animal like protists to chordates. 4
BIOL 4900 Local flora Prerequisite: BIOL 2400 or consent of instructor. An advanced course in the identification of vascular plants, native and introduced, that occur in this locality. Extensive experience in the use of taxonomic keys is included. 3
BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Honors Seminar A course designed for honors majors to discuss their research activities and topics of current biomedical interest with faculty and outside biomedical scientists. 1
BIOL 4920 Senior Honors Seminar A course designed for honors seniors to discuss their research activities, to discuss topics of current biomedical interest, and to interact with faculty and outside biomedical scientists. 2
BIOL 4930 Scientific Writing A course designed to improve student communication, both written and oral. A variety of topics are covered involving the student in writing and speaking. Among these topics are writing laboratory reports, writing essays and term papers, writing summaries and critiques, writing research proposals, writing letters of application, preparing a paper presentation, and revision. Students are taught the principles of good scientific writing and presentation and are then required to produce laboratory reports, summaries, critiques, a term paper, and a letter of application. They are also tested on the principles of excellent scientific writing. 3
BRIT 1110 Overview of the Drug Industry This course will detail the process of the drug industry starting from a drug target validation, discovery process, drug development in clinical trials and drug manufacture. 1
BRIT 1120 FDA Regulations This course will detail the regulations from the Food and Drug Administration 1
BRIT 2110 Quality Assurance This course will detail the criteria for quality of the final product through a manufacture process which involves many specifications and documentations. 1
BRIT 2120 Introduction to GMP This course will detail the definition of Good Manufacture Practice, the documentation and regulation of GMP facility. 1
BRIT 3110 Intellectual Properties and Patent Laws This course will detail the intellectual properties and patent laws in the biomanufacture and biotechnology business, ways to protect the intellectual properties by documentation, and ways to respect the patent laws. 1
BRIT 3120 Team Work Environment This course will detail the people interaction to work in a team setting and the importance to work in a team, to work with supervisors, co-workers and direct reports, and to resolve conflict situations in a team environment. 1
BRIT 4010 Beginning Microbial and Protein Sciences Research and projects will be related to the optimization of the scale-up process using recombinant microorganisms and downstream process such as improvement of purification, covalent modifications and folding of active macromolecule. 4
BRIT 4015 Advanced Microbial and Protein Sciences Research and projects will be related to the optimization of the scale-up process using recombinant microorganisms and downstream process such as improvement of purification, covalent modifications and folding of active macromolecule. 4
BRIT 4020 Beginning Mammalian Cell Genomic Sciences Research and projects will be related to the development of novel cell lines, proprietary media and viral vectors to improve the large production of recombinant proteins under serum-free conditions. Examples are research related to the design of vector carrying the gene for immunoglobulin, express of industrial scales of monoclonal antibodies in stable cell lines, genetic modification of production hosts to increase cell viability. 4
BRIT 4025 Advanced Mammalian Cell Genomic Sciences Research and projects will be related to the development of novel cell lines, proprietary media and viral vectors to improve the large production of recombinant proteins under serum-free conditions. Examples are research related to the design of vector carrying the gene for immunoglobulin, express of industrial scales of monoclonal antibodies in stable cell lines, genetic modification of production hosts to increase cell viability. 4
BRIT 4030 Beginning Bio-Analytical Chemistry Research and projects will be related to the development of highly sensitive analytical methods for the quantification of target molecules in complex biological systems, such as amines, amino acids, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. Analytical methods include but are not limited to HPLC, LC/ MS/MS, TOF-MS, capillary electrophoresis 4
BRIT 4035 Advanced Bio-Analytical Chemistry Research and projects will be related to the development of highly sensitive analytical methods for the quantification of target molecules in complex biological systems, such as amines, amino acids, peptides, proteins and nucleic acids. Analytical methods include but are not limited to HPLC, LC/ MS/MS, TOF-MS, capillary electrophoresis 4
BRIT 4040 Beginning High Throughput Sciences and Biosensor Technology Research and projects will be related to the development or the application of high throughput detection and biosensing technology, quantitative analysis of macromolecular interactions, such as kinetic analysis of macromolecular stability, and macromolecule-ligand interactions. 4
BRIT 4045 Advanced High Throughput Sciences and Biosensor Technology Research and projects will be related to the development or the application of high throughput detection and biosensing technology, quantitative analysis of macromolecular interactions, such as kinetic analysis of macromolecular stability, and macromolecule-ligand interactions. 4
CHEG 5000 Biochemistry 3
CHEM 1000 Physical Science Related to Chemistry Designed to give the student who is not a major or a minor in science an intelligent acquaintance with broad principles of physical science. Emphasis is placed on the role chemistry plays in the everyday life of a citizen. 3
CHEM 1100 General Chemistry I Prerequisite: MATH 1100 (grade of C or better) or demonstrated proficiency on the mathematics entrance examination. A first course in chemistry designed for science majors, which includes three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Topics covered include: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions; Calculations with Chemical Formulas and Equations; An Introduction to Chemical Reactions; The Gaseous State; Thermochemistry; Quantum Theory of the Atom; Electron Configurations and Periodicity; Ionic and Covalent Bonding; Molecular Geometry and Chemical Bonding Theories 4
CHEM 1200 General Chemistry II Prerequisite: CHEM 1100, MATH 1200 (a grade of C or better) or demonstrated proficiency on the mathematics placement examination. A continuation of CHEM 1100; three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Topics covered include: Liquids and Solids; Solutions; Rates of Reactions; Chemical Equilibrium; Acids and Bases; Acid- Base Equilibria; Solubility and Complex-Ion Equilibria; Thermodynamics and Electrochemistry 4
CHEM 1500 Chemistry and Human Life Prerequisite: CHEM 1000. A survey of basic facts and principles of organic and biochemistry with emphasis on the importance of these concepts to health care and normal life processes. 3
CHEM 2020 Quantitative Analysis Prerequisite: CHEM 1200. A survey of volumetric and gravimetric techniques addressing various types of equilibrium as well as an introduction to instrumental techniques is emphasized. 4
CHEM 2105 Computational Science & Informatics A course designed to familiarize the student with construction and use of computational models to study problems of scientific interest. The necessary mathematical background as well as data acquisition, evaluation, management, and visualization/presentation methods will be covered. The course will also provide an introduction to informatics, including data mining via the Internet, data warehousing, and how to effectively publish and present new data. Students will design and complete their own computational projects using these skills. 3
CHEM 3100 Organic Chemistry I Prerequisite: CHEM 1200 or 1300. An in-depth study of the compounds of carbon. 3
CHEM 3120 Organic Chemistry II Prerequisite: CHEM 1200 or 1300. An in-depth study of the compounds of carbon. 3
CHEM 3200 Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisite: CHEM 1200. A systematic study of both the fundamental principles and the descriptive chemistry needed to understand the properties of the main group elements and their compounds. 4
CHEM 3310 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I Pre or co-requisite: CHEM 3100. An introduction to common laboratory techniques used in the study of the compounds of carbon. 2
CHEM 3320 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Prerequisite: CHEM 3310. The use of common laboratory techniques in the study of carbon compounds and for the preparation of organic compounds. 2
CHEM 3330 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I Pre or co-requisite: CHEM 3100. An introduction to common laboratory techniques used in the study of the compounds of carbon. 1
CHEM 3340 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II Pre or co-requisite: CHEM 3100. An introduction to common laboratory techniques used in the study of the compounds of carbon. 1
CHEM 4010 Physical Chemistry I Prerequisites: MATH 2020 (a grade of C or better) and PHYS covering such topics as gases, chemical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, physical and chemical equilibria, solutions, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and theory of quantum mechanics and its application to chemistry. (Three lectures, one recitation hour, and three laboratory hours per week for each course.) 4
CHEM 4020 Physical Chemistry II Prerequisites: MATH 2020 (a grade of C or better) and PHYS covering such topics as gases, chemical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, physical and chemical equilibria, solutions, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, and theory of quantum mechanics and its application to chemistry. (Three lectures, one recitation hour, and three laboratory hours per week for each course.) 4
CHEM 4100 Characterization of Organic Compounds Prerequisite: CHEM 3320 or 3120. The classification and identification of organic compounds by the use of solubilities, class reactions, solid derivatives, and IR, UV, and NMR spectroscopic methods of analysis. 5
CHEM 4150 Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry Prerequisites: CHEM 3120 or consent of the instructor. A study of basic concepts, drug design, drug synthesis, drug delivery, drug metabolism, drug toxicity, pharmacological assays, and clinical trials. 3
CHEM 4200 Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisite: CHEM 3020 or 3120. An advanced study of the reactions of organic compounds and the theories of organic chemistry. Spectroscopic methods 3
CHEM 4250 Scientific Instrumentation in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Prerequisite: Junior level chemistry major and consent of department chairperson. An interdepartmental course taught by the Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Physics and designed to give students a general knowledge of the theory and application of instrumental methods and practical experience both in instrument operation and in interpretation of data obtained with instruments. A common component is interdisciplinary covering instrumental methods commonly used in all three scientific areas. An optional component covers additional instrumental methods more specifically related to each discipline. 5
CHEM 4300 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisite: CHEM 3200 or consent of the instructor. A study of bonding theories, structure, stereochemistry, energetics, and reactivity of inorganic and organometallic materials with an emphasis on transition metal compounds. 3
CHEM 4400 Instrumental Analysis Prerequisite: CHEM 2020 or consent of the instructor. Analytical chemical instrumentation with an emphasis on spectroscopic, potentiometric and chromatographic methods. 5
CHEM 4450 Environmental Chemistry Prerequisite CHEM 3120, 2020; CHEM 4010 is highly recommended. A course designed to provide an understanding of how molecular interactions and macroscopic transport phenomena determine the distribution of compounds released into the natural environment in space and time. 3
CHEM 4500 Biochemistry Prerequisite: CHEM 3120. A study of the important biochemical natural products and general aspects of metabolism. 3
CHEM 4510 Biochemistry 2 3
CHEM 4520 Biochemistry Laboratory Prerequisite: CHEM 3320 or consent of instructor. Qualitative study of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, and enzymes. 2
CHEM 4550 Techniques in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 1101. 1201, and 2200. An interdisciplinary course designed for upper level undergraduates and graduate students who have an interest in understanding theory and application of techniques in biochemistry, advanced microscopy, and molecular biology. This course is a hands-on, research level course, which is taught solely in the laboratory. Students will learn how to develop hypothesis driven protocols, conduct experiments, collect data, analyze data, and predict follow-up steps for a given project. (Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week). 4
CHEM 4700 Introduction to Research Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chair and faculty member under whom the research will be done. A course that allows the student to participate in ongoing faculty research projects. Three research hours per week for 3
CHEM 4710 Selected Topics in Chemistry Prerequisite: Advanced standing or consent of instructor. Other prerequisites and credit will depend on the topic. Selected topics that will provide majors opportunities for detailed exploration of recent and actively developing areas of chemistry. 3
CHEM 4720 Independent Study in Chemistry Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chair and faculty member under whom the study will be done. An advanced course designed to allow a student to gain specialized knowledge in an area of chemistry. The independent study may involve mastery of a subject or demonstrated proficiency in a chemical method and/or procedure. The student is expected to read selected topics independently, demonstrate a proficiency in the subject area, prepare a written report, and give an oral presentation based on his/ her studies. The student is expected to use the teachings of CHEM 4700, CHEM 4800, and/or CHEM 4910/4920. 3
CHEM 4800 Introduction to Chemical Research Literature Prerequisite: Junior level chemistry major. A survey of the important sources of chemical research information including computer searching of chemical databases is presented. The use of these sources for planning and reporting research is stressed. Special consideration is given to scientific writing techniques. 3
CHEM 4900 Applied Mathematics for Chemists Prerequisite MATH 2020 and co-requisite: CHEM 4010. The application of calculus and advanced mathematical techniques to physical chemistry. 2
CHEM 4910 Undergraduate Honors Seminar A course intended for honors chemistry majors to discuss their research activities, to discuss topics of current medicinal chemistry interest, and to interact with faculty and outside medicinal chemists. 2
CHEM 4920 Chemistry Undergraduate Seminar A required course of all ACS- and non-ACS certified chemistry majors. The student will make a formal oral presentation of laboratory research activities 1
CIS 1000 Fundamental Computing Students get an essential jump start on learning to use a basic desktop computer by learning fundamental concepts, skills for assembly and installation of state-of-the-art computer software operating systems and literacy products for college use. Course includes supervised laboratory. 3
CIS 1100 Business Computer Applications Prerequisite none. This course develops the students skills in desktop computing through the use of application software in order to solve problems within an organization. The student will develop skills in basic internet usage and word processing, spreadsheet and presentation graphic applications in a supervised structured laboratory environment. The focus of this course is primarily spreadsheet applications but students will also have the opportunity to develop other application skills. 3
CIS 1200 Advanced Business Computer Applications Prerequisite CIS 1100 or placement test. This course develops the students skills in advanced computer applications through the use of spreadsheet and database applications in order to solve problems within an organization. The student will develop problem solving skills in the context of various individual and group projects in a supervised structured laboratory environment. 3
CIS 1300 Introduction to Business Programming 3
CIS 2000 Business Programming I Prerequisite None. This course introduces the theory and application of programming logic, algorithm development and concepts for business applications. Concepts introduced include data types, constants, variables, assignment statements, arithmetic expressions, string expressions, logical expressions, if statements, case statements, loop structures, and arrays. 3
CIS 2100 Business Programming II Prerequisite CIS 2000 or equivalent. This course is a continuation of CIS 2000. It involves the manipulation of arrays, sequential files, and databases by graphical user interface (GUI)based applications. Proper organization and documentation of applications is stressed. 3
CIS 2200 Computer Organization for Business Prerequisite: CIS 1100. This course provides the hardware/ software technology background to enable systems development personnel to understand tradeoffs in computer architecture for effective use in a business environment. Includes system architecture for single-user, central, and networked computing systems; and, single and multi-user operating systems. 3
CIS 2300 Advanced Internet Programming Prerequisite: CIS 1300. This course is a continuation of CIS 1300 featuring additional concepts and languages relating to web pages and database connectivity over the Internet. Master Client and Server Side programming will be fully discussed. 3
CIS 2400 Fundamentals of Information Systems Prerequisite none. This course introduces the student to the strategic use and implications of information technology in the business environment. This course covers such topics as the fundamental information systems components, business processes, data management, security, and systems development as planned organizational change. Case studies illustrate the use of technology to solve problems and create opportunities in an organizational setting. 3
CIS 2500 Information Technology and Systems Software Prerequisite CIS 2400. This course covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software as well as advanced concepts. Students who complete this course will be able to describe the internal components of a computer, assemble a computer system, install an operating system, and troubleshoot using system tools and diagnostic software. This course enables systems development personnel to understand tradeoffs in computer architecture for effective use in a business environment. Includes system architecture for single-user, central, and networked computing systems and single and, single and multiuser operating systems. 3
CIS 3000 Software Testing for Quality Assurance Prerequisite CIS 2100. This course provides an overview of the software lifecycle from a testing perspective, the role of testing in software development, testing concepts, and terminology. Handson practice in analyzing requirements as inputs to test cases, designing, documenting, implementing, and executing tests, and analyzing test results is included. An overview of test planning, risk analysis and test management practices is provided, as well as a discussion of effective use of metrics for reporting, Also included is discussion and application of software testing tools, and communication skills for the effective tester. 3
CIS 3400 Management Information Systems Prerequisite: CIS 1100 and co-requisite MGT 3000. This course provides the student with principles and uses of computer-based information systems. Includes personal, workgroup, enterprise wide and global systems; and transaction processing, scheduled MIS, decision support, executive support, collaboration, office automation, and internet hands-on applications. 3
CIS 3420 Information Systems Management, Strategy and Sourcing Prerequisite CIS 2400. This course explores the issues and approaches in managing the information systems function in organizations and how the IS function integrates supports enables various types of organizational capabilities. It takes a senior management perspective in exploring the acquisition, development and implementation of plans and policies to achieve efficient and effective information systems. The course addresses issues relating to defining the high-level IS infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative and strategic needs of the organization. It provides an introduction to how the IS function is structured and interacts with the rest of the organization how its strategy is created in line with the strategy of the organization as a whole and provides an overview of the outsourcing process. 3
CIS 3440 Database Management Prerequisites CIS 2000 and CIS 2400. This course provides an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for the development and management of database systems. Topics include modeling, normalization, structures, physical database, logical database and accessing techniques. 3
CIS 3500 Introduction to Large Systems Prerequisites CIS 2000 and CIS 2500. This course introduces students to enterprise computing. The course is intended to facilitate the students understanding of how large systems fit in the current business computing paradigm. Theory and application of large systems will be covered. Students will be exposed to the primary tools of the mainframe environment including but not limited to Job Control Language (JCL), Job Entry Subsystem (JES), Interactive System Performance Facility (ISPF), System Display and Search Facility (SDSF) and Time Sharing Option (TSO). The course will also cover the basics of System Z architecture and the zOS operating system. 3
CIS 3510 Introduction to zVM Prerequisite CIS 3500. This course provides the student with background in the Linux operating system, virtualization, and the VM operating system. Students will be exposed to the basics of Linux operation, including installation and basic administration. Students will learn the fundamentals of virtualization technology using the zVM virtualization operating system. 3
CIS 3520 IT Security and Risk Management Prerequisite CIS 2500. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and topics of Information Technology Security and Risk Management at the organizational level. Students will learn critical security principles that enable them to plan develop and perform security tasks. The course will address hardware, software, processes, communications, applications and policies and procedures with respect to organizational IT Security and Risk Management. 3
CIS 3600 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems Prerequisite Approval of Instructor. Topics of current and special interest in information systems are presented. Course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. 3
CIS 4400 Business Process Management and Six Sigma Prerequisites CIS 2400 and DSC 3020. Business Process Management is a core function of the Information Systems professional. Information and information technology do not stand alone in any organizational or social setting. Rather they are integrated into a series of processes for accomplishing goals for the organization or for the individual. The ability to successfully construct technological artifacts is useless unless these pieces can be successfully introduced into the social setting. This course provides an overview of the skills needed to analyze, model, simulate, design and successfully implement business process changes into organizations. The Six Sigma module of this course will introduce students to the Six Sigma methodology as applied to business process change. Students will receive an overview of the history of the Six Sigma movement along with a discussion of important DMAIC, Control and Causal methodologies. 3
CIS 4440 Advanced Database Management Systems Prerequisite CIS 3440.This course further develops the concepts introduced in CIS 3440. Topics include database administration, data warehousing, data mining, advanced database design, database security and distributed database systems. Multiple database platforms will be utilized. 3
CIS 4600 Systems Analysis and Design Prerequisites CIS 3440 and CIS 4620. This course utilizes the systems development life cycle, rapid applications development, prototyping and project management concepts and tools to plan, analyze, design and prototype computer-based systems both concurrently and dynamically. Mini real world cases are initiated by students as individual, group and teamwork assignments. 3
CIS 4620 Project Management Prerequisite CIS 2400. This course introduces the concepts and techniques of project management for a broad range of projects, including information systems and business projects. Topics include resource management, organizational factors, project manager responsibilities, team building, and risk management. Tools and techniques for project estimating and scheduling will be presented. Students will complete case studies to apply the knowledge they learned to practical experiences. 3
CIS 4640 Systems Design and Implementation Prerequisites CIS 2100, CIS 2200 and CIS 4600.This course expands the projects developed in CIS 4600. Design projects are continued, rotated, expanded, reverse engineered and reengineered, as the implementation and support phases of the systems life cycle are also simulated. Project management is also continued as an assigned group or teamwork effort. 3
CIS 4801 Field Work Prerequisite Approval of lead professor. Course is open to students in the Cooperative Education Program. 4
CIS 4840 Telecommunications in Business Prerequisite CIS 2500. This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking requirements including networking and telecommunications technologies, hardware, and software. Emphasis is on the analysis and design of networking applications in organizations. Management of telecommunications networks, cost benefit analysis, and evaluation of connectivity options are also covered. Students learn to evaluate, select, and implement different communication options within an organization. 3
CIS 4860 Professional Certifications Prerequisites CIS 4640. Student is acquainted with professional certifications available in the discipline and will be prepared to sit for certification examinations. 3
CIS 4900 Seminar in Information Systems Prerequisite CIS 4600. This course involves selected topics in information systems. The content of the course will vary as new topics and techniques are developed and used by industry. 3
CIS 5520 Management Information Systems This course introduces the manager to the strategic use and implications of information technology in the business environment. Topics include how information systems affect and are affected by organizational goals and strategies basic overviews of the components of an information system hardware, software, data storage and retrieval, and network communications the Internet the information systems development process and systems development as planned organizational change. 3
CLTX 1000 Basic Apparel Construction An introductory course in basic apparel construction. These basic concepts and principles are prerequisite to apparel construction, design, and tailoring courses. Hand stitching, basic construction techniques, and sewing projects will be included. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 2410 Apparel Construction and Management Prerequisite: CLTX 1000 or passing skill exam with 70% proficiency. The study of garment components, assembly, and construction. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on garment construction, evaluation, and assembly methods to provide functionality, quality, and fit. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 2420 Clothing and People An interdisciplinary approach to the study of why and how people dress. The course provides information on the use of clothing and the personal appearance stimuli necessary for the understanding of self and others as well as giving meaning to the role of clothing to particular cultures, technologies and periods of time. 3
CLTX 2430 Apparel Alterations This course examines the methods and procedures for customizing the fit of ready-to-wear apparel. Common garment fitting problems and solutions for solving those problems will be identified and explored. 3
CLTX 2510 Consumer Textiles A study of the identification, characteristics, properties, components of textiles fibers, yarns, fabric construction finishes, government standards, laws, and regulations as related to consumer use. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 2520 Intermediate Textiles Prerequisite: CLTX 2510. An in-depth study of textile fibers. Chemical and physical testing techniques studied as they relate to end use and care. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 2620 History of Costume The study of costumes worn throughout history with emphasis on social, economic, political, technological and religious events that have influenced present day dress. 3
CLTX 3010 Fashion Illustration Prerequisite: ARTF 2110. An introduction to sketching body form fashion figure and garments on the figures. Emphasis on the interaction of the garment draped on the human form, costume rendering and layout. Computer graphics applications are also applied. 3
CLTX 3020 Apparel Design I Prerequisites: CLTX 2410, 2510. A study of apparel design that emphasizes basic standards, and elements and principles of design. Experimentation with the flat pattern method and computer aided design to draft patterns according to function, form and commercial design is emphasized. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 3030 Apparel CAD Prerequisite: CLTX 2410; ARTF 2150. Utilizing computers to facilitate the apparel and textile design process. 3
CLTX 3110 Textiles and Designs for Interiors An introduction to the fundamentals of interior design including drawing skills, symbols, space requirements and rendering two- and three-dimensional interiors. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 3820 Fashion Buying Prerequisites: MATH 1070,1100 or 1200. The fundamental principles underlying merchandising practices and procedures involving profit performance, inventory, pricing and repricing, terms of sale and dollar planning and control. The student applies these concepts in solving merchandising problems and global issues. 3
CLTX 4400 Internship in Professional Practice Prerequisites: CLTX 2410, 2420, 2510, 3020, 3030, 3820, 4410, 4510, 4520. A supervised cooperative field study in educational institutions, social agencies, businesses and industries that support the textile and apparel industry. Weekly seminar, correlated readings, and portfolio required. 6
CLTX 4410 Apparel Design II Prerequisite: CLTX 3020. An advance course in flat pattern development, draping, drafting, and computer design drawings and techniques. Experimentation with a sloper, draping, use of computer drawings, and drafting from body measurements will produce original apparel designs. Laboratory required. 3
CLTX 4420 Tailoring Prerequisite: CLTX 2410, 3020 or consent of instructor. The principles of tailoring including new methods of applications and various materials for construction. Laboratory required with garment design and construction are covered in this course. 3
CLTX 4510 Fashion Merchandising I Co/Prerequisite: CLTX 3820. The study of the basic principles that govern fashion movement and changes as well as concepts and practices in fashion merchandising at varying levels in the fashion business. 3
CLTX 4520 Fashion Merchandising II Prerequisite: CLTX 4510. An advanced study of buying and merchandising practices, and the duties and responsibilities of individuals involved in visual merchandising, fashion communication, and fashion buying. 3
CLTX 4550 Trends in Textiles and Apparel Prerequisite: CLTX 3820, 4510. A multidisciplinary examination of consumer issues in their social, economic, global and political context with a focus on consumer rights,ethics, public policy developments in production, performance,distribution and marketing of textiles and apparel. 3
CLTX 4910 Housing, Furnishings and Equipment A study of the historical, philosophical and management perspectives of housing, furnishings and equipment and the development of consumer awareness on environmental relationships involved. 3
COMP 1050L Digital Communications Systems Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1100. Preference is for students to take this course simultaneously with the Computer Networking course. One lecture and one lab per week. Introduction to local area and wide area networks. Course provides basic understanding of network concepts and router programming. 3
COMP 1051L Computer Networking Technology Prerequisite: COMP 1050L. Students may take this course simultaneously with the Computer Networking course. One lecture and one lab per week. Development of competence in designing and implementing enterprise-wide campus network using switches and routers. Course provides advanced study of local area and wide area networks. 3
COMP 1070 Programming for Science Majors An introductory course to algorithms and top-down problem solving. The course will provide an introduction to the C programming language including functions, arrays, pointers, and standard libraries; basic skills for using UNIX and Windows operating system environments will be emphasized. file system structures and access control, basic user commands, text editing and Internet utilities are covered. 3
COMP 1400 Computer Program 3
COMP 1510 Programming I: Java Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 1070 or permission of department; Co-requisite: MATH 1100 or equivalent. An introduction to computer programming in Java, with an emphasis on algorithm development and problem solving. Development of Java applications and applets from specifications; control structures; classes and methods; data types and data abstraction; object-oriented programming and design are included. 3
COMP 1520 Programming II: C++ Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 1070 or permission of department; Co-requisite: MATH 1100 or equivalent. An introduction of object-oriented programming and design in C++ with an emphasis on algorithm development and problem solving. Topics include design and implementation of classes, fundamental algorithms using arrays and vectors, file manipulation, dynamic memory management, inheritance, recursion, and simple GUI programming. 3
COMP 1525 Object Oriented Program Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 1520. An introduction to techniques and concepts in object-oriented programming such as function templates, class templates, stream input/output, exception handling, file processing, and inheritance. Elementary data structures (e.g., linked lists, stacks, and queues) and basic searching and sorting algorithms will be introduced. 3
COMP 2200 Logic for the Mathematical Sciences Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1100 or 1410. An introduction to modern symbolic logic emphasizing topics relevant to computer scientists and mathematicians. Topics in propositional calculus and predicate calculus will be augmented by topics chosen from set theory, recursive functions, and computational complexity. Topics in propositional calculus will be chosen from: completeness, circuits and Boolean algebra, and the satisfability problem. Topics in predicate calculus will be chosen from: deduction systems, compactness, incompleteness, and finite models. 3
COMP 2300 Discrete Structures for Computation Prerequisite: C or better in either MATH 2010 or COMP 2200. An introduction to combination enumeration 3
COMP 2610 Introduction to Digital Design Prerequisites: C or better in COMP 2200. An introduction to computer architecture and implementation. Topics include binary number systems, truth functions, boolean algebra, canonical forms, minimization of combinatorial logic circuits and sequential circuits design, flip-flops and adders, and storage mechanisms and their organization. 3
COMP 2615 Introduction to Computer & Arch 3
COMP 2620 Computer Hardware and Organization Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 2610. A continuation of COMP 2610. Study of computer hardware and architecture. Treatment of sequential and combinatorial circuits including flip-flops, multiplexers, decoders, adders, registers, counters. Design of functional components of a computer including memory. ALU, control unit, and busses. Coding methods, arithmetic units, instruction execution, and information transfer are emphasized. The tradeoffs of alternative architectural features such as word size, instruction sets, and addressing modes are discussed. 3
COMP 2810 Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 1520. An introduction to abstract data structures and their various implementations. Includes linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and general graphs. Algorithms which use these data structures are described and analyzed, including recursive and non-recursive searching and sorting methods. 3
COMP 3300 Introduction to Database Systems. Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 2200 and 2810. General principles and methods for database systems. The internal, conceptual, and external levels of database systems as reflected in the relational, network, and hierarchical database models. Principles and methods for database design theory. Query languages. file organizations appropriate for database systems. 3
COMP 3710 Introduction to Computer Graphics Prerequisites: C or better in COMP 2810 and MATH 2010. An introduction to raster graphics using the C programming language. Two and three dimensional rendering issues are studied, including scaling, rotation, translation, clipping, projection and other transformations and representations of 3D objects. Emphasis is on implementing a graphics package using efficient algorithms. 3
COMP 3810 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 2810. A study of advanced algorithms and data structures that are not covered in COMP 2810. This course gives an overview of the algorithmic components that commonly occur in many important applications. It emphasizes selection/design of algorithms that are appropriate for particular applications, and also emphasizes in-depth analysis of time and space efficiency. 3
COMP 3910 Undergraduate Honors Seminar Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of department required. A guided research seminar intended for computer science majors. Students investigate selected topics in computer science and participate in ongoing research. Includes individual or team projects and oral presentations. Students must devote three hours of work per week for each semester credit hour and must produce a written report on their project each semester. Topics vary. May be repeated for credit. 3
COMP 4400 Microelectronics Laboratory Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A study on the implementation of binary operations by means of electronic circuits. Operations of logic gates, design of logical networks, microprocessor architecture, memory devices and interfacing techniques will be covered. Students will use common integrated circuit devices for selected applications. 3
COMP 4460 Applications Programming I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 3410 and 4410. Computer applications of numerical algorithms for solving applied linear algebra problems and optimization problems that arise in various sciences and engineering. Programming in FORTRAN and MATLAB with emphasis on visualization of the numerical solutions. Prior knowledge of FORTRAN and MATLAB are desirable. 3
COMP 4730 Organization of Programming Languages Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 2810. An introduction to the formal study of programming language concepts including syntax and semantic issues. Grammars, data types and control structures are examined. Several languages are analyzed and compared, including representative languages from procedural, functional, object oriented, logic programming and other paradigms. 3
COMP 4820 Raster Graphics Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 3710, COMP 3810, and MATH 4410. A study of the hardware, software and algorithms for raster devices such as video displays; frame buffers, hidden-line/surface processing, anti-rastering techniques, curved surfaces generation display, lighting models, modeling of shadow, natural textures phenomena; shading and color models. Discussion of problems of current interest. 3
COMP 4830 Introduction to Computational Geometry Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 3810, MATH 2020 and MATH 4410. A study of computer-based representation, analysis, synthesis and computer-controlled manufacture of two- and three-dimensional shapes. Topics to include spline functions, parametric cubic spline curves, Bezier curves and B-Spline curves, curve and net faring, intrinsic affine invariants of parametric curves in affiine hyperspace. 3
COMP 4840 Digital Image Processing and Computer Vision Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 3810, MATH 2020 and MATH 4410. Study of the relationship of image processing and computer vision to 2-D signal processing, pattern recognition, computer graphics and artificial intelligence, geometrical model for imaging; fundamentals of image grey-level modeling and early processing 3
COMP 4850 Introduction to Operating Systems Prerequisite: C or better in COMP 2610 and 2620 3
COMP 4900 Independent Study Prerequisite: permission of department. This course provides students an opportunity to study areas of computer science not taught in other courses. A faculty mentor directs the study and assesses the student’s knowledge through oral and written reports. Repeatable for credit. Departmental approval is required for registration. 3
COMP 4910 Special Topics in Computer Science Content and prerequisites vary from semester to semester, interested students must consult the instructor or department chairperson prior to enrolling. Possible topics include computer graphics, compiler design, simulation, network programming/distributed processing, data base management systems. May be repeated for credit. 3
COMP 4920 The Senior Seminar in Computer Science Prerequisite: Senior classification. COMP 2620 and 3810. An advanced study of software engineering, with an introduction to selected topics from artificial intelligence, compiler and language theory, parallel algorithms, object oriented programming, theory of computability, and other current trends in computer science. Students will design, implement, and document a team oriented project using C or some other high level, modern programming language. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. 3
COMP 4940 Cooperative Education Prerequisite: permission of department. Through cooperative arrangements between the University and an employer the student may receive credit for on-the-job instruction which contributes to the student’s education and employability as a computer scientist. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 hours credit. Department approval is required for registration. May not be used to satisfy a computer science elective requirement. 3
CRJU 2250 Introduction to Criminal Justice Prerequisite for all Criminal Justice courses. An introduction to the philosophical and historical background, agencies, processes and functions of the criminal justice system. In addition, the course will cover major systems of social control, victimology, and comparative criminal justice. 3
CRJU 2350 Introduction to Law Enforcement An examination of the principles of organization, administration and functions of police departments. An evaluation of personnel policies, decisions, operations, command policies and the department as a whole. Contemporary law enforcement and comparative law enforcement issues will be discussed. 3
CRJU 2450 Introduction to Corrections A survey of philosophy and history of corrections a study of correctional institutions probation, parole and processes and other components of the correctional system. Contemporary corrections and comparative corrections issues will be discussed. 3
CRJU 2470 Jail Policy and Practice An analysis of jail policy and practices from both historical and contemporary perspectives. Specific attention will be devoted to jail administrative and staff demands as well as legislative and policy issues, fiscal constraints, special populations and best practices for the management of jail facilities. 3
CRJU 2500 Criminal Investigation and Forensic Science Application Prerequisite CRJU 2350. An examination of criminal investigation fundamentals including crime scene search, collection and preservation of evidence, interviews, interrogation, case preparation, and the familiarization with specific instrumentation in crime detection and evidence selection for evidentiary value. 3
CRJU 2510 Corrections in the Community This course examines the historical development of probation, parole and community-based alternatives. Emphasis will be placed on community based programs that can be a viable alternative to prison and the reentry of ex-offenders in their communities. 3
CRJU 2650 Juvenile Justice An in-depth study of the juvenile justice system. Topics covered are the development of delinquent behavior, victimology, initial handling and proper referrals, preventive police techniques, special police problems with juveniles, juvenile law, and related juvenile justice agencies. 3
CRJU 3000 Criminal Justice Theory An analysis of major criminological theories, theory construction, testing, and application. Theoretical perspectives for both perpetrators and victims of crime will be discussed. A critical analysis of their policy implications will be discussed. 3
CRJU 3020 Introduction to Private Security An examination of the role of the security industry in criminal justice administrative, personnel and physical aspects of the security field loss prevention management. 3
CRJU 3050 Community Relations Examination of police community relations from historical and contemporary perspectives. Also explore citizen involvement and community outreach in efforts to promote public safety. 3
CRJU 3060 Ethics in Criminal Justice The study of ethics and diversity in criminal justice, critical thinking and moral reasoning with selective readings emphasizing a variety of perspectives. Specific cultural and ethical issues and problems associated with law enforcement, corrections, and the courts will be emphasized as well as legal and societal constraints and codes of conduct. 3
CRJU 3070 Correctional Theory and Practice Prerequisite CRJU 2450. This course will study theoretical applications and how they relate to practice in various institutional and community correctional settings. The course will also explore the role of theory in the organizational management of corrections. 3
CRJU 3500 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Forensic Science Prerequisites CRJU 2350 and 2500. An examination of evidence, court procedures, legal and ethical issues and the role of forensic science in the field of criminal justice. 3
CRJU 3600 Advanced Forensic Science Applications with Lab Prerequisites CRJU 2350, 2500 and 3500. An overview of forensic science from a biological, chemical and criminalistic perspective, and its application from the crime scene to the court process. Permission of instructor and two years of biology or chemistry. 3
CRJU 3650 Counseling in Juvenile Justice Prerequisite CRJU 2650. This course focuses on research based prevention and intervention strategies. Emphasis will be placed on strategies that improve psychosocial functioning via risks and needs assessments, treatment planning, behavioral management techniques, and therapeutic relationships. 3
CRJU 4000 Criminal Justice Practicum Prerequisite Minimum of seventy-five earned credit hours. This course will provide students with an 80 hour field experience to integrate theoretical criminal justice perspectives with the real world of employment. In addition, classroom instruction will further develop soft and hard employment skills in preparation for their career development. 3
CRJU 4010 Correctional Management Theory Prerequisite CRJU 2450. This course is designed to give students an in-depth understanding of management theories and current management systems, supervision, and supervisory principles as applied to corrections and total care institutions administration, programs and staff roles. 3
CRJU 4025 Drugs, Addictions, Vice and Crime This course involves an in-depth examination of the causes, prevention and control of the so-called victimless crimes such as drug use, addictions, gambling and prostitution. In addition, other criminal offenses associated with crimes of vice will be discussed. 3
CRJU 4060 Statistical Methods in Criminal Justice Prerequisite MATH 1110. A statistics course that develops an understanding of statistical methods and procedures with an emphasis on criminal justice research and data analysis. A variety of statistical techniques will be discussed as well as their application in social science research. 3
CRJU 4061 Statistical Methods in Criminal Justice Laboratory Must take with corresponding CRJU 4060 course. Computer laboratory designed to enhance classroom instruction through interpreting, comprehending and use of data from an applied perspective. 1
CRJU 4110 Research Methods in Criminal Justice Prerequisites CRJU 3000, 4060, 4061. This course serves to develop student research skills with an emphasis in analytical thought processes, research design and problem solving. This course will focus on the integration of research methods, data processing and data analysis. 3
CRJU 4111 Research Methods in Criminal Justice Laboratory Must take with corresponding CRJU 4110 course. Laboratory experience in SPSS, research design, concepts, operationalization and measurement. Collecting, inputting, and interpreting data sets. 1
CRJU 4150 Police Management Theory Prerequisite CRJU 2350. An advanced course focusing upon management theories, current management systems, supervision and supervisory principles as applied to police administration. This course examines leadership skills, planning and implementation, decision making and creative problem-solving for the police administrator. 3
CRJU 4160 Correctional Counseling Prerequisite CRJU 2450 An overview and survey of counseling and rehabilitation approaches which are relevant to contemporary corrections. Techniques will be examined in the use of treatment, counseling, and rehabilitative practices. 3
CRJU 4200 International Corrections Prerequisites CRJU 2250 and 2450. An in-depth study of the major correctional systems of the world. Emphasis will be on examining existing philosophy, trends and problems of these systems. 3
CRJU 4210 Contemporary Problems in Criminal Justice I Permission of instructor required. These courses will allow the faculty to teach contemporary and special criminal justice issues that are not taught as a part of the regular curriculum. 3
CRJU 4220 Contemporary Problems in Criminal Justice II Permission of instructor required. These courses will allow the faculty to teach contemporary and special criminal justice issues that are not taught as a part of the regular curriculum. 3
CRJU 4250 Criminal Law for Criminal Justice Personnel Prerequisite CRJU 2350. A course designed to provide a basic concept of criminal law and to provide legal ground work for those who seek to enter the criminal justice system. The structure, definitions and interpretations of the most frequently used criminal statutes and the purpose of criminal sanctions will be analyzed. 3
CRJU 4260 Independent Study in Criminal Justice Permission of the instructor is required. This course allows the student to make an in-depth study of the literature in an area of special interest within the criminal justice system. The student will submit a prospectus to be approved by the faculty prior to enrollment in the course. 3
CRJU 4270 Communication Skills for Criminal Justice Personnel This course teaches the use and meaning of vocabulary peculiar to the profession and also emphasizes the skills necessary in communicating in the criminal justice area. 3
CRJU 4305 Law, Evidence and Testimony in Computer Forensics Prerequisites COMP 2110 and 2115. Provides the student with an understanding of factors related to the law, evidence and expert testimony in computer forensics. Students will demonstrate ability to understand their function with both civil and criminal cases, the burden of proof required in each, and prosecutorial and judicial duties and responsibilities. 3
CRJU 4350 Legal Aspects of Corrections Prerequisites CRJU 2250 and 2450. This course will analyze the role of law in corrections including substantive rights of prisoners, prisoner remedies, procedural rights of prisoners, the legal authority and responsibility of correctional agencies and the restoration of offenders rights. 3
CRJU 4500 Criminal Justice Honors Prerequisite 3.0 GPA and permission of the instructor. This course will allow exceptional students to work on an individual basis with a faculty member in an area of interest. 3
CRJU 4510 Criminal Justice and Court Processes The course will provide the student with an understanding of criminal law, procedure, and the court processes. The elements of offenses as well as defenses, constitutional and others, and processes from detention, arrest, pretrial, trial and posttrial will be analyzed. 3
CRJU 4600 Senior Seminar Criminal Justice seniors with permission of the instructor. This is the capstone course for criminal justice majors that require students to demonstrate, through reflection and critical analysis, their ability to integrate subject matter in the departments core areas of study. This student-centered course will require students to integrate their knowledge and skills to analyze a contemporary issue in criminal justice and provide a corrective course of action, which incorporates a nexus between theory and practice and related policy. 3
CRJU 4620 Correctional Theory, Policy and Practice Prerequisites CRJU 2450, 2470, 2510, 4160. This course will serve as a capstone course for the correction concentration. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of theory, policy and practice in corrections through their participation in a project that addresses a contemporary issue in corrections. Best practices in corrections will also be discussed. 3
CRJU 4630 Law Enforcement Theory, Policy and Practice Prerequisites CRJU 2350, 2500, 4150, 4250. This course will serve as a capstone course for the law enforcement concentration. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of theory, policy and practice in law enforcement through their participation in a project that addresses a contemporary issue in law enforcement. Best practices in law enforcement will also be discussed. 3
CRJU 4650 Juvenile Justice Theory, Policy and Practice Prerequisites CRJU 2650, CRJU 3650, SOCW 3500, SOCW 3600. This course will serve as a capstone course for the juvenile justice concentration. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of theory, policy and practice in juvenile justice through their participation in a project that addresses a contemporary issue in juvenile justice. Best practices in juvenile justice will also be discussed. 3
CRJU 4700 Criminal Justice CO-OP Prerequisites Minimum of seventy-five earned credit hours and permission from the department chair. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to have a work experience aligned with their career interest. The course varies between 10 and 40 hours per week at an approved agency. A prospectus is required prior to enrollment in the course. 1
CSB 2000 Into to Computer Science/ Business 3
CSB 3000 Computer & Business Ethics 3
CSB 4900 Capstone I 3
CSB 4910 Capstone II 3
DANC 1010 Elementary Modern Dance A study of modern dance techniques, with attention to the development of modern dance, correct posture and body alignment, dance exercises, warm-up techniques, elements of dance, traditional dance steps, and ideas for creating dances. 2
DANC 1200 Social Dancing An overview of the basic fundamentals of social dance, with attention to popular dances during each historical period by decades and their appearance in present day dance movements. Included are the waltz, foxtrot, two- step, chacha, mumbo, disco, etc. 1
DANC 2520 Intermediate Modern Dance Prerequisite: DANC 1010. A continuation of Dance 1010. A review of beginning dance techniques and an introduction to intermediate technique, beginning composition, dance experimentation and pantomime. 1
DANC 3010 Advanced Modern Dance Prerequisite: DANC 2520. A continuation of Dance 2520. A review of intermediate technique, an introduction of advanced technique, composition, beginning choreography, and jazz technique. 1
DANC 4500 Methods and Materials in Folk and Square Dancing in the Secondary Schools An overview of fundamental skills of folk and square dance with attention to techniques of teaching. Required of all majors. 1
DANC 4600 Tap and Clog Dance An overview of basic steps in tap and clog dancing with attention to methods and materials for the beginner. 1
DRAM 1000 Appreciation of Drama A survey of types of drama, of major periods of drama, and of how drama is produced and staged to develop appreciation and critical standards for Drama through studying, viewing and listening. 2
DRAM 2000 Theatre Practice Practical experience in technical theatre, costuming, management and promotions as the students assist in preparing for two major theatrical productions each semester. May be repeated for credit. 1
DRAM 2030 Technical Theatre I An introduction to the basic operation of shop tools, stage hardware and equipment, the primary elements of stage construction and the technical elements of staging, basic design and color theory, and mechanical drawing. 3
DRAM 2040 Introduction to Acting An introduction to basic principles of acting with emphasis on relaxation; discovering the body, the voice and space; stage vocabulary, character and script analysis; acting styles; and make-up. 3
DRAM 2050 Voice and Diction An introduction to basic understanding of the mechanics of voice production; the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet for diction study, and as an aid in recognizing and correcting common speech problems; the recognition of speech disorders for referral to a speech therapist; and an introduction to standard speech for the stage. 3
DRAM 2060 Oral Interpretation An introduction to the principles and methods of selecting, analyzing and presenting prose, poetry and drama through solo and group performance. 3
DRAM 2070 Stage Management 1
DRAM 2110 Theatre History I 3
DRAM 2120 Theatre History II 3
DRAM 2130 Dramatic Literature I 3
DRAM 2160 Introduction to Design 3
DRAM 3010 Dramatic Literature I 3
DRAM 3020 Dramatic Literature II 3
DRAM 3030 Directing I 3
DRAM 3040 Playwriting 3
DRAM 3050 Dramatic Literature III WI 3
DRAM 3220 Technical Theatre II 3
DRAM 3240 Scene Design 3
DRAM 3310 Acting II 3
DRAM 3330 Theatre Movement 1
DRAM 3410 Directing II 3
DRAM 4040 Acting III 3
DRAM 4110 Children's Theatre 3
DRAM 4140 African-American Drama 3
DRAM 4210 Theatre Administration 3
DSC 2010 Elementary Statistics Prerequisite MATH 2000. A course concerned with the application of statistical techniques to economic and business problems. Topics covered include description and numerical methods of describing data, probability concepts and application, discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing. 3
DSC 3020 Statistical Analysis Prerequisite DSC 2010. Statistical methods useful in analyzing business problems. Subjects to be covered include multiple regression and model building, index numbers and time series, analysis of variance, sampling techniques, and nonparametric statistics. 3
DSC 3300 Decision Sciences Prerequisite DSC 2010. An introduction to the use of mathematical concepts and models in managerial decision-making. Review of finite mathematical tools, linear programming, applied probabilistic concepts and decision theory. 3
DSC 3750 Operations Management Prerequisite DSC 3300. An introduction to the management of operating systems techniques and methods employed to plan and control manufacturing, service, forecasting, production scheduling, quality control, job design, methods, measurement and wage payments. 3
DSC 5200 Managerial Statistics This is a survey course in statistics. Special emphasis is placed on using statistical analysis in managerial decision making. Topics include descriptive statistics, topics in probability, random variables and probability distributions, hypothesis testing, statistical sampling, statistical quality control, nonparametric statistics, and regression analysis. 3
DSC 5530 Production and Systems Management This course covers issues in the design, planning, and control of the processes by which manufactured goods and services are delivered. Topics include analysis of production processes, forecasting, production planning and control, system design, total quality management, work force management, supply chain management, project management and simulation. 3
ECON 2100 Principles of Microeconomics Prerequisite MATH 1100 or MATH 1070. Fundamentals of microeconomic topics including demand, supply, market equilibrium, production and costs, behavior of modern firms, competitive and noncompetitive markets, the role of asymmetric information in decision-making, the role of government in the economy, and international trade and policy. Contemporary economic issues such as minimum wage regulation, housing market, health care regulation, and trade policies will also be discussed. 3
ECON 2200 Principles of Macroeconomics Prerequisite MATH 1100 or MATH 1070. This course introduces macroeconomic issues such as growth, unemployment, inflation, interest rate, money, exchange rates, and the balance of payments. Macroeconomic policies and global economic issues are also discussed at length. Analytical tools will be used to teach the contemporary economic issues in the United States and other countries and analyze the effectiveness of alternative macroeconomic policies. 3
ECON 3310 Money, Financial System, and the Economy Prerequisite ECON 2200. This course introduces the functions of money and the role of the monetary system in the U.S. economy. Other topics include the Central Banks, money supply and demand, bond and stock markets, interest rates, global financial and monetary systems, and financial crisis. 3
ECON 4400 International Economics Prerequisite ECON 2200 or ECON 2300. This course covers the global economic systems in relation to the U.S. economy. Both monetary and real aspects of the global economy are discussed. Topics include trade theories and policies, patterns of trade, free trade agreements, growth and income distribution under free trade, global financial crisis, international accounting, U.S. current account deficits, exchange rate determination, World Trade Organization (WTO), European Union, and globalization. 3
ECON 4500 Managerial Economics Prerequisites ECON 2200, 2300, and DSC 3300. This course uses the basic microeconomics tools to analyze managerial decision-making. Major topics include demand theory, production and cost functions, pricing in competitive and noncompetitive markets, game theory, strategic interactions, forecasting, benefit cost analysis, and non-pricing strategies. 3
ECON 5540 Economic Analysis This course focuses on the application of economic concepts in individual and business decision making process. Optimization techniques in dealing with maximization of consumer satisfaction and profit as well as minimization of cost under certain and uncertain conditions are emphasized. It also discusses tools to analyze aggregate economic behavior such as economic growth, money, productivity, inflation, and unemployment. 3
EDU 2600 Orientation to Teaching This course focuses on Praxis I preparation in test taking skills and in all three subtest areas: Reading, Writing and Mathematics. Praxis I is required by the NC Department of Public Instruction for admission to all Teacher Education Programs. This course is open to all prospective teacher education students and is required in most program areas. 2
EDU 2800 Computer Utilizations in Instructional Technology Restricted to pre-education majors. This is a practical and applied study of computer utilizations geared to the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers, 3
EDU 2900 Independent Study of Educational Problems This requires permission of instructor. This is an independent study to permit the pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research and/or field work. The student desiring to take this course will present a study proposal to the department for approval. Students who show unusual promise as developing educators may take this course as an honors activity. 3
EDU 3000 Introduction to Educational Psychology This is an introduction to the study of cognitive development and characteristics of school-aged learners. Additionally, the theories of learning which shape teaching and the principles of pedagogy which guide best educational practice are introduced. Ten hours of field experience are required. 3
EDU 3010 Human Growth and Development This is an introduction to the study of human growth from conception through early childhood, middle years and adolescence. Emphasis is placed upon application of the basic concepts of physical, perceptual, mental, personality, social, language, emotional and moral development of children and adolescents. Attention is given to the possible causes, characteristics and teacher detection of learning problems of special populations of children. Students examine how schools meet the developmental needs of their student populations by conducting in-school interviews with school personnel and at least one child. Ten hours of field experience are required. 3
EDU 3020 Foundations of Education 3
EDU 3030 Diversity, Pedagogy and Social Change Consistent with the School of Education conceptual framework "Educators for Diverse Cultural Contexts," this course includes an overview of the major historical, philosophical, sociological and structural forces and the diverse influences, which have shaped American education. Emphasis is given to current reform movements in education and to the changing needs of society. The major problems and issues surrounding the context of teaching, particularly the role of economic class, ethnicity, race, gender, physical conditions, and linguistic diversity and their correlation with educational achievement are stressed. A major focus will be on each candidate developing a conceptual framework on his or her personal cultural identity, character, and the impact of diversity issues on his or her life, so that in understanding oneself, the candidate develops a greater understanding of and positive impact on others. This course requires twenty hours of field experience. 3
EDU 3120 Inclusive Teaching for Students with Special Needs Prerequisites EDU 2600, EDU 2800, EDU 3000, EDU 3010. This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills related to the appropriate education of children with special needs in the general education classroom setting. This is a survey course which includes a study of the legal and educational foundations of serving students with disabilities in the general education setting. Ethical issues surrounding the teaching of children with learning and behavioral differences are included in the content. Particular emphasis is placed on developing skills for identifying learning strengths and needs in all children and developing instruction to match those strengths and needs. Teaming and collaboration are an important concept in inclusive education and will be emphasized. 3
EDU 3130 Cultural Diversity 1
EDU 3150 Instructional Planning Prerequisites: Admission to TEP, EDU 2600 or a departmental early field experience, EDU 3000. The course provides students with competencies in specific technical skills of teaching by focusing on learning theory, learning styles, educational taxonomies, teaching methods, classroom management, and lesson planning. Students have the opportunity to apply their learning during their field experience in an assigned classroom. The students tutor individual learners, plan lessons with the teacher, and facilitate small or whole group instruction. Twenty-five hours of field experience are required. 3
EDU 3170 Assessment of Learning Prerequisites: Admission to TEP, EDU 2600 or a departmental early field experience, EDU 2800, EDU 3000, EDU 3010. The course focuses on assessment as a tool in delineating needed revisions in evaluation methods and materials and on the use of evaluation results to modify future assessments, teaching strategies, and curricula. Students will work with an assigned teacher to construct criterion referenced tests based upon the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Students administer, score and complete item analyses of the results. Ten hours of field experience are required. 3
EDU 3210 Elementary Education Curriculum (Art, Music, Drama) This is an examination of methods of teaching art, music, and drama in the elementary grades (K-6). An integrated approach utilizing methods, techniques, and materials common to these curricular areas will emphasize multiple intelligences and creative development. field experience is required. 3
EDU 3230 Teaching Social Studies This course is designed for elementary majors and focuses on effective, developmentally appropriate, instructional methods for the teaching and learning of social studies in the elementary schools. This course focuses on key concepts and generalizations in the fields of anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, history, geography, and the humanities. The course content includes oral language, writing, and literature related to the key concepts and principles related to the social sciences. Special attention is given to the integration of social studies and interdisciplinary teaching in the elementary school curricula. field experience is required. 3
EDU 3310 Foundations In Literacy Assessment and Planning This course is a survey course designed to prepare beginning teachers to administer literacy assessments and use the information to plan and Implement dynamic literacy Instruction. The course content includes topics such as systematic observation, literacy strategies. Candidates will also investigate surrounding differentiated literacy instruction. The course requires fifteen 3
EDU 3400 Language Arts Instruction in the Elementary School K-6 This is a survey of methods designed to prepare beginning teachers for instruction in language arts 3
EDU 3410 Principles of Teaching Reading K-9 Prerequisite or concurrent: EDU 3400. This is a survey course in reading instruction. The course provides a comprehensive treatment of the major topics of reading, including emergent literacy, approaches and materials used to teach beginning reading, word identification, vocabulary, comprehension, and literature-based reading instruction. Teacher candidates also investigate issues in teaching reading to mainstreamed exceptional students. field experience is required. 3
EDU 3520 Teaching Mathematics This course prepares teacher candidates to teach mathematics in elementary schools. The focus of this course will be on understanding mathematical concepts and developing appropriate lessons and strategies for teaching mathematical concepts to all children. An emphasis is placed on meeting the needs of all learners in culturally diverse educational environments. field experience is required. 3
EDU 3540 Integrated Science, Mathematics, and Technology This course prepares elementary education teacher candidates to teach by integrating science, mathematics, and technology. This course has four components: earth science, space science, physical science, and life science. The focus of this course is on increasing content knowledge and on planning and implementing developmentally appropriate, integrated mathematics and science units. This course includes inquiry-based and computer laboratory experiences. field experience is required. 3
EDU 3700 Introduction to Statistical Methods in Education This is an introduction to basic statistical methods and their application to education. Attention is given to procedures in tabulating data and calculating basic statistics, such as measures of central tendency, correlation, and standard deviation, as well as the properties and applications of normal probability curve. Major emphasis is placed upon interpretation of descriptive measures, and an introduction to inferential statistics is provided. field experience is required. 3
EDU 3800 The Middle School This is an overview of the philosophy, rationale, organizational patterns, and curricular elements of the middle school. Emphasis is placed on the developmental characteristics and needs of early adolescents as they are addressed through middle school components, such as interdisciplinary team teaching, flexible block scheduling, advisory programs, exploratory program, and responsive teaching. fifteen hours of field experience are required. 3
EDU 3810 Language Arts/Social Studies Instruction in the Middle School This is a study of instructional methods in language arts and social studies for middle grades education majors. The course focuses on instructional practices typical of middle grades language arts methods in selected areas 3
EDU 3820 Mathematics/Science Instruction in the Middle School This is a study of instructional methods in mathematics and science for middle grades education majors. Strategies for teaching mathematics and science are presented using current research, curriculum standards, and instructional technology. Appropriate lessons are modeled, simulated and discussed. Special attention is given to the integration of mathematics and science throughout the middle grades curriculum. fifteen hours of field experience are required. 3
EDU 3840 Inst Plan Prog Sci 3
EDU 4010 Reading In the Content Areas This course will focus on literacy strategies across the content areas of mathematics, science, social studies, English and second languages, health, physical education and cultural arts. The candidate will learn specific ways to enhance content area learning, while increasing reading and writing abilities In their students. This course will require 15 hours of field experience in a middle and/or high school setting. 3
EDU 4020 English as a Second Language and Second Language Literacy This course will explore language teaching approaches for second language learners. A variety of topics will be covered, including English for specific purposes, language skills for second language learners 3
EDU 4030 Literacy Assessment and Intervention This course explores various formal and informal diagnostic techniques for effective monitoring of student development in literacy. The course, which spans emergent through adolescent literacy, addresses diagnosis of difficulties in reading, implementation of corrective instruction, and prevention of literacy difficulties. Assessment strategies will be applied to children with reading difficulties and summarized In a written report. This course must be taken with EDU 4040: Practicum in Literacy Assessment and Intervention. 3
EDU 4040 Practicum in Literacy Assessment and Intervention This course, taken concurrently with EDU 4030: Literacy Assessment and Intervention, provides an opportunity for candidates to apply assessment and intervention methods learned in EDU 4030. Candidates will be placed in classroom settings and work closely with one struggling reader or writer. Candidates will prepare a diagnostic report, which summarizes the reader’s background, results from various assessment measures, and recommendations for future instruction. Intervention plans will also be developed and implemented to address some of the reader’s difficulties. This course will require 6 hours per week of field experience in an elementary, middle, or high school setting. 4
EDU 4060 Language and Culture This course is designed to address the importance of language and how it is inextricably bound to identity, both as an instrumental tool for communication as a carrier of cultural values and attitudes. This course focuses on the socio-cultural and linguistic aspects that shape and influence students’ identity. This course helps teachers develop: 1) an awareness and sensitivity to effectively work with students with diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds, and 2) a commitment to intervene in social injustice as a means to closing the achievement gap. Therefore, a strong emphasis on the content on cultural and linguistic diversity is a necessary prerequisite to preparing teachers to serve the needs of students whose first language is not English and who are from diverse cultural backgrounds. 3
EDU 4070 English as a Second Language Practicum This course, taken concurrently with EDU 4020: English as a Second Language and Second Language Literacy (3), provides an opportunity for candidates to apply assessment and instructional strategies learned in EDU 4020. Candidates will be placed in ESL classrooms, or in classrooms in which there are ESL learners. Candidates will prepare and implement plans to assist individuals, small groups, and/or whole class of ESL learners. Candidates will assess and document the impact of their instruction on ESL student learning. Candidates will be expected to spend a minimum of 2 hours twice a week in the ESL practicum placement. 4
EDU 4101 Materials and Methods in Art This course is designed to provide students with a general knowledge of various aspects of instruction and learning in preparation for teaching art in the public schools, i.e., teaching and learning theory; effective methodology; the selection, preparation, organization, and scheduling of course content; classroom management; motivation, discipline, evaluation, and working with others. 3
EDU 4102 Methods and Materials in Comprehensive Science This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4202, is designed to provide students with a general knowledge of methods organization, selection of materials, and effective teaching procedures in the sciences 3
EDU 4106 Methods and Materials in Dramatic Art This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4206, is a survey of the materials and methods of teaching drama and oral communication in the school. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching dramatic arts, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Attention is given to curriculum development and the management of related extracurricular dramatic activities. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4107 Methods in Middle Grades Education Completed concurrently with EDU 4207. This is a review of general teaching methods in middle grades education, this course provides a survey of current issues in the middle school, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4108 Methods in Elementary Education Completed concurrently with EDU 4208. A review of general teaching methods in elementary education, this course provides a survey of current issues in elementary education, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4109 Methods and Materials in English This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4209, is an examination of instructional strategies which provides opportunities to discuss, demonstrate, and evaluate a variety of methods in the teaching of English. The skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening are reviewed to develop the ability to impart these skills to students. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching English, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4110 Methods and Materials in Modern Foreign Languages This is a competency-based course addressing current theory and widely accepted models and methods of second-language instruction for grades 9-12. It is a practice-centered course requiring demonstration of acquired knowledge in simulated and actual situations. Emphasis is placed on the North Carolina Public School Second-language Curriculum and on developing the professional knowledge and skills necessary to teach in that curriculum. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4111 Methods and Materials for Foreign Language in Elementary and Middle Schools [FLEMS] Co-requisite: EDU 4110 or permission of department. This is a competency-based course presenting theories, models, and practices of second-language teaching for kindergarten thorough middle grades. It incorporates knowledge of child development, language acquisition, and the school curriculum to promote skills in teaching and in material and program design. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching foreign language, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 2
EDU 4115 Methods and Materials in Human Sciences This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4215, is an examination of skills used in applying principles of curriculum development, knowledge of adolescents and social trends to instructional planning. Emphasis is on meeting individual needs of learners through selection and structuring of objectives, content and learning experiences. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching human sciences, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4117 Methods and Materials in Mathematics This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4217, is an overview of various methods of teaching mathematics. Textbooks as well as standardized tests and teacher-made tests are discussed. Special attention is given to the material in the current issues of The Mathematics Teacher and the Yearbook of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. This course provides a survey of effective teaching methods in mathematics, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4118 Methods and Materials in Music This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4218, is a study of methods and materials used in teaching the various music subjects and activities in public schools. The principles of music education, its problems, and the more frequently used evaluation procedures are also studied. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching music, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4121 Methods and Materials in Physical Education This course, completed concurrently with EDU 4221, is a study of the selection, organization and presentation of materials and the study of various necessary methods. Practical teaching and activity situations are provided to determine means of improving teaching techniques. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching physical education, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4126 Methods and Materials in Social Sciences Completed concurrently with EDU 4226. The techniques of social science instruction in high school are considered. Special emphasis is placed on the utilization of resources. This course provides a survey of current issues in teaching social sciences in high school, effective teaching methods, classroom management techniques, and a review of philosophies of student discipline. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4141 Methods and Materials in Library Science This is an overview of techniques and materials essential for the operation and management of a school library as a materials center, and a knowledge of methods and materials used in the teaching of library lessons. [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 3
EDU 4201 Directed Teaching of Art [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4202 Directed Teaching of Comprehensive Science [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4206 Directed Teaching of Dramatic Art [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4207 Directed Teaching of Middle Grades [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4208 Directed Teaching of Elementary Education EDU 4209. Directed Teaching of English 6
EDU 4209 Directed Teaching of English 3
EDU 4210 Directed Teaching of Modern Foreign Languages [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4215 Directed Teaching of Human Sciences [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4217 Directed Teaching of Mathematics [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4218 Directed Teaching of Music [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4221 Directed Teaching of Physical Education [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4226 Directed Teaching of Social Sciences [EDU 4100 SERIES Corequisite: EDU 4200 Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted a full semester prior to student teaching. The following methods and materials courses are intended to give an understanding of the special teaching procedures and materials related to each of the special fields of teaching. These courses provide an understanding of teaching procedures, classroom management, reading skills and effective teaching strategies and materials related to specialized subjects areas. These courses are components of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education for elementary, middle school, secondary and specialty area majors. The student teacher completes the professional portfolio and participates in mock interviews and specialty area coaching sessions. Prerequisite to all methods courses are admission to the Teacher Education Program and an overall GPA of at least 2.5.] 6
EDU 4300 Classroom Utilization of Instructional Technologies This course is designed for students in the teacher education program and has a focus on using technology in the classroom. The course addresses teacher requirements for the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers, 3
EDU 4320 Basic Principles of Guidance This is a study of the functions and organization of guidance and counseling services. An overview of student needs, counselor roles, individual appraisal, group counseling, career planning, and the helping process is provided. 3
EDU 4520 Photography This course is an application of photographic skills emphasizing 35 mm, digital, and instamatic type cameras in instruction and training with special emphasis on composition, visual language, and theories of non-verbal communication of visuals. 3
EDU 4530 Introduction to Videography This is an overview of the development of the motion picture as an art form and as conveyor of information. The student develops competencies in editing, lighting, and programmed script development. 3
EDU 4700 Preparation of Instructional Technologies This course provides an opportunity to develop the basic techniques and communication skills which lead to competencies in the design and development of instructional materials, including layout and design, illustration, color, dry mounting, hot and cold laminating, lettering, and large poster/blackboard design. 3
EDU 4750 Introduction to Speech/Language Pathology This is an introduction to the processes of speech, language, and hearing; classification and description of their pathologies, their evaluation and management. The interaction of the field of speech/language pathology with other health/human service professions is also covered. 3
EDU 4760 Scientific Bases of Speech This is a survey of the physiological and acoustical aspects of speech production, its transmission and reception. Specific information regarding the processes of respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, and audition is also covered. 2
EDU 4770 Hearing Science This course covers the subject of hearing from sound to sensation, including the structure and function of the auditory system. 2
EDU 4780 Aural Rehabilitation This is an introduction to the theories, methods, and systems of developing, maintaining and/or enhancing oral communication skills in children and adults with hearing impairment. Speech reading, auditory training, and amplification and other assistive listening devices are stressed. 3
EDU 4800 Phonetics This is an introduction to the study of the perception and production of the vowels, diphthongs, and consonants of spoken American English, employing an adapted version of the IPA. The focus is on broad transcription of normal and disordered speech. 3
EDU 4810 Clinic Observation This course will target the recognition of specific methods and skills need to effectively start the clinical practicum as well as to obtain the 25 hours of observation of both adults and children in a variety of settings. 1
EDU 4902 Independent Study in Elementary Education (Permission required.) These courses are designed to permit the independent pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research or field work. The student desiring to take these courses must present a study proposal to the appropriate program coordinator for approval. 3
EDU 4903 Independent Study in Counselor Education (Permission required.) These courses are designed to permit the independent pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research or field work. The student desiring to take these courses must present a study proposal to the appropriate program coordinator for approval. 3
EDU 4905 Independent Study in Middle Grades Education (Permission required.) These courses are designed to permit the independent pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research or field work. The student desiring to take these courses must present a study proposal to the appropriate program coordinator for approval. 3
EDU 4906 Independent Study in Special Education (Permission required.) These courses are designed to permit the independent pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research or field work. The student desiring to take these courses must present a study proposal to the appropriate program coordinator for approval. 3
EDU 4907 Independent Study in Speech Language Impaired (Permission required.) These courses are designed to permit the independent pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research or field work. The student desiring to take these courses must present a study proposal to the appropriate program coordinator for approval. 3
EDU 4908 Independent Study in Educational Technology (Permission required.) These courses are designed to permit the independent pursuit of information on and solution of educational problems through library research or field work. The student desiring to take these courses must present a study proposal to the appropriate program coordinator for approval. 3
EDU 4950 Special Topics in Education These courses are an in-depth study of special areas of concern to educators. Because specific topic emphasis varies from semester to semester, the courses may be repeated for credit. [EDU 4900 SERIES 3
ENG 1110 English Composition I A study of the essentials of English composition and rhetoric, with emphasis on expository essays. English majors and minors must earn a grade of C or better prior to enrolling in any ENG or MSCM course for which ENG 1110 is a prerequisite. 3
ENG 1120 Freshman Honors Seminar: The Nature of Man Prerequisite: Admission into the University Honors Program. An inquiry into the basic human structures and characteristics. In a given semester, the emphasis will be on rational, religious, psychological, cultural, biological, historical, social, or economic issues. 3
ENG 1130 Freshman Honors Seminar: Independent Reading, Writing, and Research Prerequisite: Admission into the University Honors Program. A course that concentrates on reading, writing, and research skills, offering the honors student the opportunity to pursue independent study in his or her field of interest. 3
ENG 1210 English Composition II Prerequisite ENG 1110. A continuation of the study of the essentials of English composition and rhetoric. Emphasis on the reading of prose fiction, of drama, and of poetry; expository writing, documentation, and research in response to literary works. English majors and minors must earn a grade of C or better prior to enrolling in any ENG or MSCM course for which ENG 1210 is a prerequisite. 3
ENG 1250 Elements of Speech Communication An introduction to the elements of interpersonal communication and public speaking, with emphasis on practical applications. 3
ENG 1300 Introduction to World Literature I Prerequisite: ENG 1210. An introduction to the history of world literature from ancient times through the sixteenth century. Designed to provide opportunities for critical reading and the writing of short analytical papers. English majors and minors must earn a C or better prior to enrolling in any ENG or MSCM course for which ENG 1300 is a prerequisite. 3
ENG 1310 Introduction to the Humanities I Prerequisite: ENG 1210. An examination of the fundamentals and interrelations of the humanistic disciplines: literature, philosophy, the visual arts, music, dance, drama, film. Humanistic themes such as the concept of the individual, religion, gender, and love explored in some ancient western and non-western civilizations. 3
ENG 1320 Introduction to the Humanities II Prerequisite: ENG 1210. A continuation of ENG 1310. Fundamentals of and relations between the humanities re examined and humanistic themes explored in the modern period. European, American, and Third World cultures included. 3
ENG 1400 Introduction to World Literature II Prerequisite: ENG 1210. An introduction to world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Designed to provide opportunities for critical reading and the writing of short analytical papers. English majors and minors must earn a C or better prior to enrolling in any ENG or MSCM course for which ENG 1400 is a prerequisite. 3
ENG 1500 Techniques in the Critical Reading of Literature Prerequisite: ENG 1210. A study of the practical and technical skills involved in the reading of literary genres. Specific focus will be placed on critical thinking and on analytical skills which enhance comprehension of various literary texts, especially poetry. English majors and minors must earn a C or better prior to enrolling in any ENG or MSCM course for which ENG 1500 is a prerequisite. 3
ENG 1700 Religion and Literature Prerequisite: ENG 1110. A course designed to explore religious issues in selected world masterpieces. 3
ENG 2105 Introduction to Technical Writing Prerequisite: ENG 1210. A study of the tools and techniques of technical writing with individualized assignments pertaining to a student’s discipline. Emphasis on letters, instructions, memos, proposals, reports, and collaborative writing. 3
ENG 2115 Introduction to Linguistics Prerequisite: ENG 1210. An overview of patterns and use of language. Includes discussion of elements of language 3
ENG 2200 Introduction to Public Speaking The study and practice of informative and persuasive public communication, with attention to organization of ideas, oral effectiveness, and speech analysis. 3
ENG 2220 Sophomore Honors Seminar: A Historical and Comparative Study of Human Institutions I Prerequisite: Admission into the University Honors Program. An introduction to and comparisons of various political, economic, social, and religious institutions throughout history. Emphasis is placed on the importance of human institutions for the historical and social development of mankind. 3
ENG 2230 Sophomore Honors Seminar: A Historical and Comparative Study of Human Institutions II Prerequisite: Admission into the University Honors Program. A continuation of ENG 2220. 4000-Level English Language and Literature Courses 3
ENG 2310 Survey of English Literature I Prerequisite: ENG 1500. A survey of English literature from its beginning to 1832. 3
ENG 2320 Survey of English Literature II Prerequisite: ENG 1500. A survey of English literature from 1832 to the present. 3
ENG 2340 Contemporary African American Literature Prerequisite: ENG 1110. An exploration of African American literature with an emphasis on selected twentieth century authors. 3
ENG 2350 Studies in English Literature Prerequisite: ENG 1210. An exploration of selected works by authors writing in English. This course focuses on a particular period, movement, genre, or engagement with a cultural or philosophical debate. 3
ENG 3105 Professional and Technical Writing Prerequisites for undergraduates: ENG 2105. A study of professional communication with practice in writing documents such as proposals and formal reports. Formerly offered as ENG 4105. 3
ENG 3110 Advanced English Grammar Prerequisites: ENG 1210 and junior classification. An historical and descriptive study of English grammar. 3
ENG 3120 Advanced Composition Prerequisite: ENG 1210 and junior classification. A course that focuses on the writing of critical and informal essays and documented papers. 3
ENG 3300 Applied Literary Criticism Prerequisites: ENG 1500; 2310, 2320, or 2330 (one of the three). An introduction to several of the techniques and approaches of literary criticism with concentrated study of a few authors. (Fall, Spring) 3
ENG 3310 Survey of American Literature I Prerequisite: ENG 1500. A survey of American literature from its beginning to the Civil War. 3
ENG 3320 Survey of American Literature II Prerequisite: ENG 1500. A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. 3
ENG 3400 Junior-Senior Seminar Prerequisites: ENG 1210; ENG 1300 or 1400; ENG 1500. An investigation of special topics and problems in language and literature with emphasis on the writing of critical analyses. 3
ENG 3410 African American Literature I Prerequisites: ENG 1500. A survey of poetry and prose by major figures in African American literature from the beginning through the Harlem Renaissance. 3
ENG 3420 African American Literature II Prerequisite: ENG 1500. A survey of poetry and prose by major figures in African American literature since the Harlem Renaissance. 3
ENG 3505 Women’s Literature Prerequisite: ENG 1500 or permission of the instructor. An examination of selected literature by women from the Middle Ages to the present, with attention to the effects of race, class, and gender. 3
ENG 3605 Contemporary Literature Prerequisite: ENG 1500 or permission of the instructor. A study of selected recent literature. 3
ENG 3700 Creative Writing: Prose Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Opportunities for students to develop their potential in various forms of creative prose with an emphasis on the short story. 3
ENG 3800 Creative Writing: Poetry Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Opportunities for students to develop their potential in writing various forms of poetry with an emphasis on the lyric. 3
ENG 4000 The History of the English Language Prerequisites: ENG 1110 and ENG 3110. An introduction to the study of the philological and historical development of the English language from the Old English period to modern times. 3
ENG 4110 The Nineteenth-Century Novel Prerequisites: ENG 1500; 2310, 2320 or 2330; 3310 or 3320; or permission of the instructor. A study of major novels by nineteenth-century writers with emphasis on British and American works. 3
ENG 4120 The Twentieth-Century Novel Prerequisites: ENG 1500; 2310, 2320, or 2330; 3310 or 3320; or permission of the instructor. A study of twentieth- century novels by major writers from a variety of cultures with emphasis on British and American works. 3
ENG 4200 Modern African Literature Prerequisites: ENG 1500. A study of African literature from 1930 to the present. 3
ENG 4300 Shakespeare Prerequisites: ENG 1500 and one of the following: 2310, 2320, 2330. A study of selected comedies, histories, and tragedies. 3
ENG 4320 English Drama Prerequisites: ENG 1500 and one of the following: 2310, 2320, 2330. A study of English drama from the beginning to the end of the nineteenth century. 3
ENG 4420 Contemporary British and American Drama Prerequisites: ENG 1500 and one of the following: 2310, 2320, 2330. A study of representative British and American dramatists of the twentieth century. 3
ENG 4700 Twentieth-Century British Literature Prerequisites: ENG 1500 and one of the following: ENG 2310, 2320, 2330. An intensive study of twentieth-century British poets and prose writers with emphasis on the major figures of the modernist period. 3
ENG 4900 Integrating Reading and Writing Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the School of Education for English with Licensure. A study of methods designed to prepare middle and high school language arts teachers to plan English curricula. Course content focuses on unit and lesson planning. 3
ENGM 2410 History of Mass Communication 3
ENGM 2430 Media and Society 3
ENGM 2440 Report Writing for Mass Media 3
ENGM 3560 Writing for RadioTV 3
ENGM 3570 Audio Production 3
ENGM 3580 Video Production 3
ENGM 3590 Communication Public Relations 3
ENSC 4200 Principles of Toxicology Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor, CHEM 4500 highly recommended. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and principles of the multidisciplinary science of toxicology. It is designed to provide a foundation for matriculation in advanced courses in toxicology. Students learn about routes and processes for entry, biotransformation, and elimination of toxicants from the body; toxicity mechanisms; and toxicity testing procedures. 3
ENSC 4400 Special Topics in Environmental Science The selected topics for each offering will vary depending on the expertise of visiting faculty and other resident expertise. Topics will be those not covered in other courses. Student participation will include written and oral presentations and laboratories when appropriate for the topic. Course may be taken two times for credit 4
ENSC 4420 Environmental Science Seminar Prerequisites: Senior status in Environmental Science major or consent of instructor. This course is a study of a contemporary environmental problem, its scientific, social, and policy dimensions, and its possible solutions. Students synthesize, integrate, and apply their broad environmental science backgrounds through interactions with expert guest speakers, field trips, and class discussions and presentations. Majors must take course two times for credit. 1
ENSC 4450 Environmental Chemistry Prerequisites: CHEM 1100, CHEM 1200, CHEM 3100, CHEM 3120. CHEM 4010 highly recommended. This course includes the study of the sources, reactions, transport, and fate of chemicals in environmental media. It includes an in-depth study of how molecular interactions and macroscopic transport phenomena determine the distribution of compounds released into the natural environment in space and time. 3
ENSC 4510 Environmental Science Internship Prerequisites: Senior standing in Environmental Science major. This is a study of the role and activities of government and private sector environmental organizations, acquired by serving as part-time, on-site intern in one of these organizations. 2
ENSC 4700 Independent Study Prerequisite: Departmental approval. An advanced course designed to allow the student to gain specialized knowledge in an area within environmental science. The student is expected to develop the questions to be addressed through the independent study, read the literature on the selected topic and give oral and written reports of their readings. 3
FCSC 1000 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences An introduction to the field of family and consumer sciences and its philosophy from a historical, contemporary, and futuristic perspective. 3
FCSC 2000 Observation and Participation in Vocational Family and Consumer Sciences A study of vocational Family and Consumer Sciences programs in North Carolina. Such observation and participation in Family and Consumer Sciences programs provide early field experience for prospective teachers. 3
FCSC 2150 Computer Applications in Consumer and Family Oriented Careers 3
FCSC 2170 Interpersonal Relationships and Group Dynamics A study of group behavior, conflict management, group dynamics and problem solving techniques in interpersonal relationships. 3
FCSC 2800 Health, Nutrition and Safety in Early Childhood An overview of the health, medical and physical needs of young children including safety procedures, infection control, common health problems, and licensing standards. Competencies for working with typical children and those with complex medical needs and physical disabilities are emphasized. 3
FCSC 2810 Introduction to the Education of the Young Child (renumbered from HECO 3100) An orientation to the philosophy, history, foundations, and basic principles of child development, early childhood education and early childhood special education. Emphasis is on recommended practices including family-centered, interdisciplinary, inclusive, individualized, individually appropriate, and culturally sensitive care. 3
FCSC 2900 Prenatal, Infant and Toddler Development An interdisciplinary, multicultural study of theories and research related to the physical, sensor motor, social, emotional, cognitive, communicative, aesthetic, and adaptive development of infants and toddlers. Observation experiences required. 3
FCSC 2910 Typical and Atypical Preschool Development An interdisciplinary, multicultural study of theories and research related to the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, communicative, aesthetic, and adaptive development of typical and atypical children ages 3 to 5. Observation experiences required. 3
FCSC 3000 Middle Childhood and Adolescence A study of growth and development in middle childhood and adolescence 3
FCSC 3210 Creative Activities for Young Children Prerequisite: FCSC 2900 or FCSC 2910. Designed to identify creativity and implement strategies which encourage creativity in children. Emphasis will be on the development of nontraditional teaching through innovative curricula and technological experiences. Laboratory required. 3
FCSC 3300 Adulthood and Gerontology An analysis of the major characteristics and problems common to adulthood and the aging process. 3
FCSC 3320 Family Policy An examination of policies, issues and concerns which affect the social, economic and political functions of contemporary families. 3
FCSC 3600 Guiding Behavior in Young Children Prerequisite: FCSC 2900 or FCSC 2910. An in-depth study of developmentally appropriate guidance theories and strategies including establishing effective classroom routines and procedures, promoting prosocial behavior, minimizing disruptive behavior and utilizing effective behavior management techniques. 3
FCSC 3610 Curriculum and Instruction for Young Children A focus on knowledge and skills in utilizing developmentally and functionally appropriate curricula models for children from birth through kindergarten. 3
FCSC 3620 Program Development for Infants and Toddlers Prerequisite: FCSC 2900. Co-requisite: FCSC 3621. An introduction to the theoretical bases, goals, philosophies and characteristics of quality programs for infants and toddlers. Creating appropriate learning environments, building trusting and respectful relationships with children and their families, and developing an individualized curriculum will be the foundation for the course. 3
FCSC 3621 Practicum with Infants and Toddlers Prerequisite: FCSC 2900. Co-requisite: FCSC 3620. A weekly seminar designed to link theory and practice FCSC 3620 knowledge and skills through experiences in various settings with children from birth through age two. Opportunities are provided to reflect on individual’s experiences. 1
FCSC 3630 Program Development for Preschool and Kindergarten Prerequisite: FCSC 2910. Co-requisite: FCSC 3631. An introduction to the theoretical bases, goals, philosophies and characteristics of quality preschools and kindergartens including developmentally appropriate, family-centered, play-based, and inclusive care. The appropriate use of technology in the preschool and kindergarten classroom is presented. 3
FCSC 3631 Practicum in Preschool and Kindergarten Prerequisite: FCSC 2910. Co-requisite: FCSC 3630. An opportunity to link knowledge and skills through experiences in a classroom setting with children between 3 years and kindergarten. A weekly seminar will connect theory and concepts from FCSC 3630 to real life settings and provide opportunities to reflect on individual’s experiences. 1
FCSC 3640 Assessment and Evaluation in Early Childhood Prerequisite: FCSC 2900 or 2910. Designed to develop a broad set of child and family observation skills and the ability to apply and interpret a variety of formal and informal assessment tools. Methods of evaluating the effectiveness of teaching staff, curricula, and aspects of educational programs are presented. 3
FCSC 3650 Language and Literacy in Early Childhood Prerequisite: FCSC 2900 or 2910. Examines early language development and the language arts of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Content includes the knowledge and skills needed to implement an integrated language arts curriculum and adapt it to meet the learning needs of individual children. 3
FCSC 3900 Management Theories and Principles An application of theories and principles of human resource management which influence the selection and use of resources. Students may choose to register for 4 hours which requires laboratory experiences. 4
FCSC 4100 Cooperative Education Prerequisite: FCSC 2000. A study of occupational competencies essential for effective community partnerships. Classroom instruction will emphasize cooperative planning with local agencies, businesses and industries for training related to occupational family and consumer sciences areas. Portfolio required. 3
FCSC 4110 Curriculum and Program Planning Co/Prerequisites: CLTX 2410, 2510, 3110; FOOD 2200, 2310. An application of principles of curriculum development in instructional planning. Needs of individual learners are met through the use of a variety of methods, strategies and techniques, including simulated teaching, which enables students to master teacher competencies. 3
FCSC 4120 History and Philosophy of Career and Technical Education An in-depth study of the history, foundation, organization and philosophy of the work force development process at the middle grade level. 3
FCSC 4130 Organization, Techniques and Materials for Middle Grade Programs A study of curricula methodologies resources, and facilities for teaching middle grades. 3
FCSC 4200 Family and Social Systems Family and social systems theories, research, and application to marriage and family settings. An ecological, bi-directional view of individuals, families and communities is presented. 3
FCSC 4500 Consumer Economics An analysis of basic economic principles which influence decisions involving individual and family finances, with emphasis on purchasing practices of the consumer. 3
FCSC 4620 Practicum in Human Development Prerequisite: All major courses through the first semester of the senior year or the permission of the instructor. The practical application of theory related to working with children, individuals and groups in diverse cultural contexts. 3
FCSC 4730 Administration and Supervision of Human Development Programs (renumbered from HECO 4720) Prerequisites: FCSC 2900,3000, 3610. Management and leadership principles as they apply to the administration of human development programs. Supervisory techniques, job descriptions, data analyses, record keeping, budget management, and program evaluation are emphasized. 3
FCSC 4750 Special Problems Prerequisite: Junior/Senior status and permission of the instructor. An in-depth study of critical issues and problems in Human Sciences. This course may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
FCSC 4810 Perspectives on Disadvantaged and Special Needs Individuals and Families Prerequisites: FCSC 2900, 2910 or 3000. A study of selected societal conditions which affect individuals, families, and multi-cultural groups. Strategies for working with disadvantaged and special needs individuals are included. 3
FCSC 4900 Senior Seminar in Human Sciences Prerequisite: Senior status. A capstone course for family and consumer sciences majors. 2
FCSC 4920 Parent Education Co-requisite: FCSC 4200. Emphasis will be placed upon promoting cooperative relationships among children, educators, and community personnel to enhance child’s growth and development. 3
FCSC 4930 Reading and Research in Early Childhood Prerequisites: FCSC 2810, 2900 or 2910, and 3610, 3620 or 3630. An introduction to educational research including quantitative and qualitative approaches. Requirements include reading and critiquing research studies which utilize various methodologies. 3
FCSC 4940 Families, Professionals and Communities: Teaming and Collaboration Co-requisites: FCSC 4200, 4941. Examines the functions of teams in early childhood as well as the roles of a variety of professionals in assessment, intervention and agency coordination. This course explores the models of the team process, the coordination of responsive services for families, and various models of consultation. 3
FCSC 4941 Practicum with Families Co-requisites: FCSC 4200, 4940. An opportunity to link knowledge and skills through experience working with families or the agencies serving families. A weekly seminar connecting theory and concepts from FCSC 4940 to real life settings, competency based assignments, and reflection on individual’s experiences. 1
FCSC 4990 Directed Teaching in Birth Through Kindergarten Prerequisites: all courses in the major. A full semester, 300 hour, supervised placement working with children between the ages of birth and kindergarten. Provides students with an opportunity to practice newly acquired skills in settings in which they can be observed and coached by selected licensed teachers. 12
FIN 3200 Principles of Finance Prerequisites ACCT 2400, DSC 2010. This course is designed to give business students an understanding of corporate finance. The course introduces students to corporate governance, time value of money and its application to securities valuation in finance. Other topics covered include the risk return tradeoff, basic capital budgeting, firm debt and dividend policies, financial ratios, mergers and acquisitions, and international corporate finance 3
FIN 3220 Financial Management Prerequisites FIN 3200, DSC 2010. The role of the financial officer as a key member of management is the central thrust of this course. It covers securities valuation, capital market theory, working capital management, and Financial Statements analysis and projection techniques. The financial questions investigated concern the management and analysis of cash, accounts receivable, inventory and shortterm liabilities as well as analysis of profitability and risk. The method of instruction involves both lectures and cases. 3
FIN 3400 Principles of Insurance Prerequisite FIN 3200 or consent of the instructor. A study of the basic principles of insurance and the theory of risk. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of various insurance contracts and fundamentals of selecting insurers. 3
FIN 3850 Principles of Real Estate Prerequisites ACCT 2500, ECON 2200, ECON 2300. An introduction to real estate theory and practice economic fundamentals, physical characteristics, urban growth, city structure, land use planning, legal aspects, market analysis, appraisal, investment analysis, financing taxation, property management, operation of the real estate market, and land development. 3
FIN 4100 Investment Prerequisites FIN 3200 This course introduces students to the theory and practice of security analysis and portfolio management. It provides for broad understanding of security markets, with special emphasis on their information efficiency. Considerable attention is given to the analysis and valuation of bonds, common stock, options and futures. Other topics include portfolio theory, capital market theory and related empirical studies and portfolio performance evaluation. 3
FIN 4150 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets Prerequisites FIN 3200. A study of the structures and functions of financial institutions and their relationships to the financial management of firms. 3
FIN 4220 Commercial Bank Management Prerequisites FIN 3200. Principles underlying the management of a commercial bank, capital funds, asset and liability management, value maximization, legal and operational considerations. 3
FIN 4300 Life and Health Insurance Prerequisite FIN 3400. A study of life, health and annuity contracts, rate making and group insurance, the role of life and health insurance in personal financial planning and their use in business. 3
FIN 4350 Property and Liability Insurance Prerequisites FIN 3200, FIN 3400. A study of liability, fire, automobile, marine, burglary and other property insurance contracts. Emphasis is placed on insurance as a method of handling personal and business property and liability risks. 3
FIN 4410 International Finance Prerequisite FIN 3200. This course analyzes financial problems corporations face that result from operating in a corporate strategy and the decision to invest abroad, currency arbitrage, forecasting exchange rates and exchange risk, cost of capital and financial structure in multinational environment. 3
FIN 4520 Financial Statement Analysis Prerequisites ACCT 2500, FIN 3200. A course dealing with the analysis of information contained in a firms financial statements. The focus is on understanding this information and using it to make investment decisions regarding the firm. These investment decisions involve valuation and require analysis of the information contained in the firms financial statements to forecast future earnings, dividends, and cash flows. The course will consider how the results of the firms investing, financing, and operating activities can be analyzed to determine firm value. 3
FIN 4740 Management of Real Estate Assets Prerequisites FIN 3200, FIN 3850. A study of the management techniques applicable to the longterm management and operation of income producing properties. Emphasizes the generation of maximum longterm economic returns from real estate investments, leases, lease negotiations, ownership, insurance and taxation. 3
FIN 4980 Seminar in Financial Management Prerequisites FIN 3220, and senior standing. A study of recent developments in the financial management literature as well as the application of financial theories and techniques of analysis to the search for optimal solutions to financial management problems. 3
FIN 5550 Financial Policies This course covers advanced problems in business financial theory and management. Capitalization, liquidation, consolidation, and mergers will also be included. 3
FOOD 2200 Introduction to Human Nutrition An introduction to the nutrients essential to human life and well being. A study of the nature of dietary nutrients, their functions in the body and food sources. 3
FOOD 2210 Sanitation and Safety 2
FOOD 2300 Nutrition and Health Promotion Prerequisite: FOOD 2200; SCI 1220.A consumer course in nutrition designed to help students understand the impact of nutrition on complete well-being and optimal health. 3
FOOD 2310 Food Selection, Preparation and Meal Management Prerequisite: FOOD 2200 or 2300. The scientific principles of food preparation with emphasis on standards of selection, purchasing, preparation, storage and preservation; includes management principles essential to menu planning, food preparation, and meal service and evaluation. Laboratory required. 3
FOOD 2320 Intermediate Nutrition Prerequisites: FOOD 2200; MATH 1070 or MATH 1100; Co-requisite: CHEM 1200. An in-depth study of the nutrients in terms of their classification, functions, food sources, physiological and biochemical basis for nutrient requirements, dietary standards, nutrient quality interrelationships. 3
FOOD 2340 Intermediate Meal Management Prerequisites: FOOD 2200, 2310. The principles essential to menu planning, production and management. Laboratory required. 4
FOOD 3200 Sanitation and Safety An application of “The Sanitation Risk Management Program” 2
FOOD 3210 Clinical Assessment and Counseling 2
FOOD 3410 Food Science and Experimental Foods Prerequisites: FOOD 2200; SCI 1220. A study of the physical and chemical structure of food and the effects of processing and preparation on properties. Basic skills in scientific report writing and research methods with food products are studied. 4
FOOD 3510 Institutional and Quantity Food Purchasing Prerequisite: FOOD 2310. An introduction to food purchasing for institutional and business enterprises. Quality control, marketing, bidding practices used in industry, and governmental regulations will be emphasized. 3
FOOD 3520 Institutional Management and Organization Prerequisites: FOOD 2310, 3510. The principles of organization and management of food service operations, including analysis of selected administrative problems. Organizational structure, behavior and group dynamics are explored. field trips to local food service establishments and a portfolio are required. 3
FOOD 4210 Applied Nutrition Prerequisites: FOOD 2320; CHEM 3100; BIOL 1620. An overview of the application of nutritional principles including: malnutrition, life cycle, nutrient megadoses, fiber, exercise, weight control, and food fads. Written reports and project required. 3
FOOD 4500 Nutrition Biochemistry 4
FOOD 4600 Clinical Nutrition I Prerequisites: FOOD 2320, 4210, CHEM 3100. An introduction to patients and clients. Medical foods and supplements, disease classiflcation and symptoms, and development of suitable dietary plans for the nutritional support of individuals with certain pathological conditions are studied. 3
FOOD 4620 Applied Competencies in Nutrition 2
FOOD 4630 Clinical Nutrition II Continuation of FOOD 4600, Clinical Nutrition I. This course covers the classification, symptoms and nutritional management of patients with major disease conditions including diseases of the urinary tract, diabetes, cardiovascular system, and eating disorders. 3
FOOD 4640 Nutrition and Later Maturity An examination of nutrition and aging. Course is primarily concerned with the biological aspects of aging, food habits, nutritional requirements, meal planning and community resources available to the elderly. 3
FOOD 4660 Clinical Nutrition Practicum Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. The field experience is meant to strengthen learning activities in clinical nutrition for students in dietetics. Time will be spent in observation, information interpretation, developing and evaluating diet, preparing reports, nutritional assessment and learning about the dietetic profession. 2
FOOD 4670 Nutrition Education Prerequisites: FOOD 2200 or 2300, 2310. A survey of the philosophy, principles and methods of nutrition education. Discussions include reliable sources of nutrition information, tools and skills used in conducting nutrition programs, and various aspects of nutrition surveillance, nutrition care and promotion. Portfolio required. various aspects of nutrition surveillance, nutrition care and promotion. Portfolio required. 2
FOOD 4671 Community Nutrition Prerequisites: FOOD 2200 or 2300, 2310, 4670 2
FOOD 4700 Quantity Food Production and Service Prerequisites FOOD 2310, 3520. An application of principles of quantity food service. Production, scheduling, equipment operation, labor cost control and service procedures for quality foods prepared in quantity are included. field experience required. 3
FOOD 4710 Food Service Management Practicum Prerequisites: FOOD 3510, 3520. A supervised practicum required of all food service management students at senior level. 6
FOOD 4800 Food Service Planning: Layout and Equipment The scientific principles of layout and design of food service facilities. System components of electrical, refrigeration, equipment and space allocations are explained as they relate to systematic design and layout principles. 3
FREN 1000 Introduction to French Language and Culture A course designed to foster an understanding of the French people through the study of their customs, their institutions, and their most outstanding artistic and scientific achievements. The course is taught in English; no knowledge of French is needed. 3
FREN 1020 Francophone Culture A course designed to acquaint students with the main characteristics of the culture and civilization of countries using the French language outside of France, especially those of Africa and the Caribbean. The course is taught in English; no knowledge of French is needed. 3
FREN 1040 Basic Conversational French Strictly conversational courses for beginners. Emphasis on sentences and vocabulary related to everyday situations. 2
FREN 1050 Basic Conversational French Strictly conversational courses for beginners. Emphasis on sentences and vocabulary related to everyday situations. 2
FREN 1140 Elementary French I An introduction to the basis of the French language. Fundamentals of pronunciation, structure, and vocabulary prepare the students to carry on simple conversations in everyday, concrete situations. The four communication skills 3
FREN 1141 Elementary French II Prerequisite: FREN 1140 or the equivalent. A proficiency- based course developing the four communication skills 3
FREN 1142 Elementary French III Prerequisite: FREN 1141 or the equivalent. An interactive, proficiency-based course requiring the application of previously learned and new vocabulary and structures to the completion of a series of tasks. Students work individually and in groups to develop and present scenarios of conversations and interactions typical of real-life exchanges in a variety of settings. 3
FREN 2100 Intermediate French I Prerequisite: FREN 1141 or the equivalent. Emphasis on oral communications, reading for direct comprehension, and brief written exposition. 3
FREN 2120 Technical and Commercial French Prerequisite: FREN 2100 or the equivalent. Introduction to the language of the French and Francophone business worlds, including the economy, government policy, banking, insurance, unions, corporate law, La Bourse, advertising, import/export, and monetary policy. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 2200 Intermediate French II Prerequisite: FREN 2100 or the equivalent. Development of skills in spoken and written French, with attention to fundamental structures. Listening to authentic language samples. Reading of short journalistic and/or literary texts. 3
FREN 2300 Introduction to Francophone Literature Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or the equivalent. Guided reading of literary texts illustrating a variety of genres, periods, and movements. Composition and discussion in French. 3
FREN 3000 Applied Phonetics Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or the equivalent. Formal study and application of rules of French pronunciation. Use of IPA in transcriptions. Listening and speaking practice. 3
FREN 3080 Syntax and Composition Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or the equivalent. Progressive development of writing skills. Stress on functional grammar, syntactical, and lexical concepts. Integration of writing and other skills. 3
FREN 3100 Oral and Written Expression I Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or permission of Department. Practical speaking and listening development. Emphasis on broadened vocabulary, use of idioms, and communication strategies in both spoken and written expression. 3
FREN 3110 French Culture and Civilization Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or permission of Department. A survey of the major social, political, artistic, literary, and spiritual forces which produced the culture and civilization of France. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 3130 Francophone film Area elective credit for majors. Survey of selected Francophone and Caribbean films and filmmakers. The films - which refect the socio-political, economic and cultural issues of African and Caribbean societies at various stages in their history-are discussed within thematic, aesthetic and stylistic frameworks. 3
FREN 4110 Advanced Grammar and Composition Prerequisite: FREN 3080 or permission of Department. Integration of the formal aspects of language within the context of written expression. Diverse written assignments. 3
FREN 4200 Oral and Written Expression II Prerequisite: FREN 3100 or permission of Department. Intensive practice in the spoken and written language. Emphasis on new vocabulary and idioms through reports, discussions, and performance. 3
FREN 4210 Survey of French Lit Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or permission of Department. A panoramic view of the development of French literature from the Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4220 Survey of Francophone Literature Prerequisite: FREN 2200 or permission of Department. A panoramic view of the development of Francophone literature in the 19th and 20th centuries. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4230 Special Topics Prerequisite: FREN 2300, 3110 or permission of Department. Focused study on a topic or theme related to Francophone literature and/or culture, such as tradition versus modernity in French-speaking Africa and the New World, cultural assimilation versus the search for and affirmation of cultural identity, literature of political revolt, etc. May be taken two times for credit each time. 3
FREN 4300 French Literature of the Seventeenth Century A comprehensive study of the classical period in French literature, its origins, manifestations, and influences. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4400 French Literature of the Eighteenth Century A study of the growth and development of liberalism and the idea of progress in literature during the Age of Reason, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4420 French Literature of the Nineteenth Century A study of the major authors and literary trends in prose and poetry: Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Parnassianism, Symbolism, and the precursors of Surrealism. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4500 French Literature of the Twentieth Century A comprehensive study of major authors and ideas from 1920 to the present time. Emphasis on Proust, Gide, Mairaux, Camus, and Sartre. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4550 Black African and Caribbean Literature in French Study of the themes and the styles of 20th-century black writers from countries such as Guadeloupe, Martinique, Haiti, Senegal, and the Ivory Coast through selected poems, essays, “contes, and novels. Conducted in French. 3
FREN 4600 Techniques in Translation I Techniques of translation studied through comparative language patterns. Two-way translation using various types of written prose is emphasized, and oral translation of the spoken language is introduced. 3
FREN 4610 Techniques in Translation II Techniques of translation studied through comparative language patterns. Two-way translation using various types of written prose is emphasized, and oral translation of the spoken language is introduced. 3
FREN 4700 Study Abroad Programs Courses completed with a program or university in a French-speaking country. 9
FREN 4800 Senior Seminar Advanced seminar treating a special topic in Francophone literature and/or culture chosen by the instructor. Required for majors. 3
FREN 4900 Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. Individual work under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of study and determines the means of evaluation. May be taken two times for credit each time. 3
FREN 5000 French: A Reading Knowledge Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. Designed to assist graduate students in preparing for the foreign language examination. Successful completion of course fulfills the graduate foreign language requirement. 0
GEOG 1000 Introduction to Geography An introduction to the study of geography as spatial analysis. It includes an examination of geographic concepts, characteristics of selected countries and the relationships of natural environments, cultural backgrounds, economic conditions, and world problems. 3
GEOG 1100 World Regional Geography A general survey of the cultural, physical, economic, and political developments in various regions of the world. An analytical study of the resource bases of the nations and the utilization of the resources of people in all parts of the world will be a primary concern. 3
GEOG 1310 Map Reading 3
GEOG 1320 Map Reading and Interpretation An introductory level course that emphasizes a basic understanding of maps and how they are used as a means of communication. Students will complete a series of exercises focusing on the reading, analysis, and interpretation of various types of maps. No background in college geography and/or artistic experience is required. 3
GEOG 2000 Cultural Geography of Afro-America An investigation of the spatial characteristics of African- American culture in the Americas. It reveals through individual research, reports, projects and discussions the role played by African Americans in the transformation of the physical and cultural earth. 3
GEOG 2010 Online Weather An introduction to applications and techniques employed in the study of atmospheric weather phenomenon. This is a meteorology course that uses real time data offered from the federal government data sources via the Internet in partnership with college and university faculty. It also provides students with a comprehensive study of the principles of meteorology while providing classroom and laboratory applications focused on the current weather situations. 3
GEOG 2020 Geographical Information Systems 3
GEOG 2100 Physical Geography An introductory level course dealing with those physical elements that control the earth’s environment and thus influence plant, animal, and human life. This course offers a systems approach to understanding the global environment. The systems studied are atmospherical, biological, geological, and hydrological. 3
GEOG 2120 Geology An introduction to the general principles of the processes of nature by which the earth’s surface has been built- up, deformed and torn down, with special emphasis on the geologic history of North Carolina and its rocks and minerals; a study of the several weather elements; and a general study of the composition and distribution of the elements of climate. 3
GEOG 2130 Advanced Physical Geography Prerequisite: GEOG 2100. An analysis of the interior and exterior forces of the earth with major emphasis upon weathering agents and mass wasting. Advanced research in geomorphology is presented along with field research experiences. The use and operation of laboratory and field instruments are of major importance. 3
GEOG 2140 Oceanography An introduction to the physical and social variation caused by the oceans and their impact on man’s future needs and demands. A series of computer analyses and applications will guide exploration and study of this rapidly advancing science. 3
GEOG 2220 Economic Geography A study of the global economy through spatial analysis. The geographical distribution and production of raw materials are examined. Attention is given to the impact of economic activities on the environment. 3
GEOG 2350 Earth Science A survey of the processes that produce volcanoes, earthquakes, hurricanes, and foods. The earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere are studied. Attention is also given to elements of astronomy. 3
GEOG 2600 Geography of North Carolina A study of the human and physical geography of North Carolina. Particular emphasis is placed on physiographic regions in terms of resources and natural environment. 3
GEOG 2991 Cooperative Education Open to sophomores only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction 3
GEOG 2992 Cooperative Education Open to sophomores only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction 6
GEOG 2993 Cooperative Education Open to sophomores only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction 9
GEOG 2994 Cooperative Education Open to sophomores only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction 12
GEOG 3110 Political Geography An analysis of the organization and distribution of political phenomena in their areal expression. Emphasis is placed on the concept of geopolitics as it relates to power, strategy, and international relationships among the sovereign countries. Some consideration is given to the distribution of local and state political systems of North Carolina. 3
GEOG 3120 Geography of North America A survey of the major geographic regions of North America; an analysis of the economic activities in their relations to the natural environment; and a study of the interactions of selected variables over space. 3
GEOG 3220 Geography of South America An analysis of the natural setting, the distribution of the people, the important occupations, and the problems of future development in each of the several regions of Hispanic America. 3
GEOG 3310 Climatology An analysis of weather and climatic elements with a strong emphasis on energy budget systems and climate regimes of the world. Consideration is given to understanding the variation of climates from region to region and the reciprocal relationship between climates and other primary elements of the natural environment. Particular emphasis is placed on instrumentation and interpretation of weather maps during the laboratory sessions. 3
GEOG 3320 Cartography An introductory course on the nature and use of maps, the use of computers to construction various map projections and their applications, and the preparation and use of maps for various types of analysis. 4
GEOG 3400 Geography of the West Indies and Environs A study of the cultural geography of the West Indies. However, Mexico, Central America, the Bahamas, the islands adjacent to Mexico and Central America, and the Dutch islands of Aruba and Curacao are also given considerable attention. 3
GEOG 3420 Aerial Photo Interpretation An examination of the numerous skills necessary to interpret aerial photos as related to the field of geography. It covers the art and science of recognizing natural and cultural features, subtle as well as obvious, on the earth’s surface. 3
GEOG 3430 Principles of Remote Sensing An analysis of satellite imagery. The principal topics will include data collection, instrumentation, processing, and analysis of digitized information obtained from Landsat and varied platform mounted sensors. Applications in remote sensing will include crop inventory, forest cover mapping, water resources, geology, and other land resource topics. 3
GEOG 3435 Geographic Information Systems A survey of the use of geographic information systems 3
GEOG 3500 Population Geography An analysis of the spatial patterns of population size, density, distribution, and composition. It also examines the causes and consequences that the population explosion has had upon the total cultural landscape for selected developed and underdeveloped countries. 3
GEOG 3510 Urban Public Transportation Systems Analysis of transportation networks in populated regions presented in a clear and technical manner. Principles reviewed in this class are used by the local, regional and national transportation agencies. Thus students gain marketable skills directly transferable to the work force. 3
GEOG 3991 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 3
GEOG 3992 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 6
GEOG 3993 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 9
GEOG 3994 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 12
GEOG 4010 Applied Geographic Information Systems Prerequisite: GEOG 3435. A course that provides instruction in the application of techniques and methods employed in spatial analysis using Geographic Information Systems. Students will plan and execute steps to complete several projects using GIS procedures. The student receives in- depth training in database design and development. 3
GEOG 4020 Computer Cartography Prerequisite: GEOG 3320. A review of the use of computer hardware and software in cartography. Special attention is focused on the digitizing, plotting, and pattern generation of selected data bases which are utilized in the spatial analysis of geographic problems. 3
GEOG 4110 Quantitative Techniques in Geography An introduction to the research process in solving problems in geography through statistical methods. Emphasis is placed on basic techniques used in collecting, analyzing, and presenting research data in the field of geography. Students will be exposed to research tools used in the behavioral and natural sciences. 3
GEOG 4120 Advanced Cartography Prerequisite: GEOG 3320. A focus on the problems of map making, production, and reproduction of non-topographic maps. This computer-based course further develops the methods of presenting spatial information using charts, graphs and tables. Another objective is the representation of cultural features at different scales and for different purposes. 3
GEOG 4220 Conservation of Natural Resources A study of the conservation of soil, water, wildlife, forest, mineral and energy resources in the United States and North Carolina. Emphasis is placed on practices employed in resource conservation and land use planning. Consideration is given to environmental problems derived from the usage of natural resources. The approach is through the interaction between population, power, production, pollution, and places. 3
GEOG 4230 Minerals, Energy and Environment Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher. A study of the accessibility of mineral and energy resources to population centers. The impacts of extracting and using mineral and energy resources on natural environments are examined. Conservation methods and planning strategies are analyzed. Particular attention is given to non-traditional energy sources as a means of pollution abatement. 3
GEOG 4310 Geography of Africa A survey of geographical facts and common myths associated with African history and development. Strong emphasis is placed on climates, physiography, natural resources, and social conditions in Africa. Occasionally, a comparative analysis is made between North America and Africa. Selected countries are discussed in detail. 3
GEOG 4320 Seminar in Cartographic Research Prerequisite: GEOG 3320. An investigation and application of specific topics in cartography. Some of the topics include map projections, mental mapping, generalization in large and small scale maps, computer graphics three-dimensional mapping, and military mapping systems. 3
GEOG 4500 Social Geography An analysis of the spatial and social processes which act in concert to bring about present-day social structures. In addition, this course will attempt to shed light on many of the social ills of the spatial and social environment. 3
GEOG 4600 Urban Geography A study of the city as a geographic unit. Emphasis is placed on urban functions and structure with particular reference to the growth, arrangement, and planning of commercial, industrial, and residential districts. 3
GEOG 4840 Geography of Asia A survey of the physical and human geography of China, Japan, the USSR, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Southwest Asia 3
GEOG 4900 Seminar in Geography Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission of the department. Emphasis on research tools on specific geographical topics. Students are required to make reports on recent developments in geography. 3
GEOG 4920 Theory and Methodology A survey of the history of the discipline of geography and the wide ranging themes that define geography today. Major topics include: geography in a changing world, land-human relationships, regions, spatial interaction and mapping, and population, resources, and socioeconomic development. 3
GEOG 4980 Independent Study Prerequisite: Departmental approval. An advanced course designed to help students gain depth in selected areas of geography. This is achieved by giving students the opportunity to become familiar with geographical literature, to read selected topics independently, and to give oral and written reports on their readings. The courses will involve the principles of research and scientific analysis. 3
GEOG 4990 Independent Study Prerequisite: Departmental approval. An advanced course designed to help students gain depth in selected areas of geography. This is achieved by giving students the opportunity to become familiar with geographical literature, to read selected topics independently, and to give oral and written reports on their readings. The courses will involve the principles of research and scientific analysis. 3
GEOG 4991 Cooperative Education Open to seniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 3
GEOG 4992 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 6
GEOG 4993 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 9
GEOG 4994 Cooperative Education Open to juniors only. A program of vocation education for students who, through written cooperative arrangements between NCCU and one or more employers, receive instruction (including required academic instruction) by alternation of study and school with a job in an approved occupational field (but only if these two experiences are planned by the University and employer so that each contributes to the student’s education and employability). This course, an elective, may be taken up to four times for credit each time. 12
GERM 1160 Elementary German I This is the first of a three-semester proficiency-based sequence (with GERM 1161 and 1162) to develop the four communications skills (listening comprehension, speaking, reading, writing) and understanding of culturally determined attitudes and behaviors. An interactive essential to functioning in the target culture. 3
GERM 1161 Elementary German II Prerequisite: GERM 1160 or the equivalent. This is the second of a three-semester proficiency-based sequence 3
GERM 1162 Elementary German III Prerequisite: GERM 1161 or the equivalent. This course is an interactive, proficiency-based course requiring the application of previously learned and new vocabulary and structures to the completion of a series of tasks. Students work individually and in groups to develop and present scenarios of conversations and interactions typical of real- life exchanges in a variety of settings 3
GERM 2010 Masterpieces of German Literature in English Translation A survey of the masterpieces of German Literature in English translation. Includes text and cinematic materials. Given in English. 3
GERM 2101 Applied German Prerequisite: GERM 1161 or the equivalent. Extension and application of skills to materials individualized to match students major fields of study. Preliminary study of requisite grammar and resource tools leads to an individualized examination of authentic texts from business, the natural sciences, the social sciences, the arts, or humanities. Also open to graduate students seeking practical refresher course. Successful completion of the course fulfills the graduate foreign language requirement. Given in German. 3
GERM 2102 Conversational German Prerequisite: GERM 1161 or the equivalent. A continuation of the development of the five basic language skills with an emphasis on listening comprehension and speaking. Continued vocabulary building; use of authentic spoken and visual materials as starting points for extended verbal interchange on topics of personal expression and use in daily life. Given in German. 3
GERM 2103 Grammar and Composition Prerequisite: GERM 1161 or the equivalent. A continuation of the development of the five basic language skills with an emphasis on writing for specific purposes. Continued vocabulary building; review, extension, and application of structural and grammatical elements into connected writing. Given in German. 3
GERM 2104 Introduction to German Civilization Prerequisite: GERM 1161 or the equivalent. A survey of the major political, economic, social, and artistic developments in Germany from tribal beginnings to 1945. Major topics include Norse Mythology and pre- Christian values, church and state conflict, Gothic and Barock styles, The Reformation, industrialization, and the rise of nationalism. Readings, discussion, and some composition in German. 3
GERM 2105 Introduction to German Literature Prerequisite: GERM 1161 or the equivalent. A guided reading of samples and excerpts from literary texts illustrating the broad variety, periods and movements in German literature. Introduces general definitions, concepts and modes of approach to literary study. Readings, discussion, and some composition in German. 3
GERM 2106 Contemporary Germany An investigation of Post-War Germany designed to provide students from any field with an understanding of the dynamics of modern day Germany. Topics range from the Nazi legacy and consequences of the war to the economic miracle, the political division and reunification, the status of women, the educational system, artistic developments, religious life, daily customs and attitudes, the persistence of racism, and Germany in the new world order. Given in English. 3
GERM 3080 Syntax and Composition Prerequisite: GERM 2103 or the equivalent. Progressive development of writing skills. Stress on fundamental, functional grammatical, syntactical, and lexical concepts. Integration of writing and other skills. 3
GERM 3100 Oral and Written Expression I Prerequisite: GERM 2102 or Permission of Department. Practical speaking and listening development. Emphasis on broadened vocabulary, use of idioms, and communication strategies in both connected spoken and written expression. Given in German. 3
GERM 4110 Advanced Grammar and Composition Prerequisite: GERM 2103 or permission of Department. Integration of the formal aspects of language within the context of written expression. Diverse writing assignments. 3
GERM 4210 Survey of German Literature Prerequisite: GERM 2105 or permission of Department. A survey of the types, periods, and major movements of German literature. Readings, discussion, and composition in German. 3
GERM 4230 Special Topics Prerequisite: GERM 2104 or 2105 or 2106 or permission of Department. A focused study on a topic or theme related to German literature and/or culture. May be taken two times for credit each time. 3
GERM 4700 Study Abroad Programs Courses completed with a program or university in a German-speaking country. 9
GERM 4900 Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission of Department. Individual work under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of study and determines the means of evaluation. May be taken two times for credit each time. 3
HADM 1000 Introduction to Hospitality Management Corequisite HADM 1100. A survey of the hotel, restaurant and tourism industries their history, problems, general operating procedures, management functions, and concepts in hospitality and tourism management. Executives from the hospitality industry sectors will be featured. 3
HADM 1100 Lodging Management and Operations Corequisite HADM 1000. An overview of the functions and operations of departments in various lodging facilities to include front office operations and guest services, housekeeping, accounting systems, and night audit. Personnel issues and regulations related to the provision of quality services will be examined and analyzed. 3
HADM 2000 Introduction to Travel and Tourism Prerequisite HADM1000. This course provides a basic understanding of domestic and international trends in travel and tourism to include the terminology, demographics, historical, economical, sociocultural, and environmental trends related to tourism management and sustainable development. 3
HADM 2010 Applied Sanitation and Safety This course introduces students to the basic principles of sanitation, hygiene and safety as it relates to the 283 hospitality and tourism industry. Emphasis is placed upon training of supervisory personnel in sanitation procedures. Course meets standards for certified food safety manager certificate. Students must pass certification examination to receive credit. 1
HADM 2900 Hospitality Work Experience I Prerequisites HADM 1000 and 1100. Professional work experience in various sectors of the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will identify management challenges and formulate strategies and plans for improvement. Emphasis will be placed on mastering specific skill sets identified in the work experience manual. (This course satisfies 250 hours of the 1000 hours of work experience required.) 0
HADM 3000 Procurement in Lodging Facilities and Food and Beverage Outlets Prerequisites HADM 2010, ACCT 2500.This course covers purchasing of goods and services specifically for lodging facilities and food and beverage outlets. Emphasis on buying procedures, inventory control, standards and specifications, receiving and storing processes of goods, and ethical concerns is covered. 3
HADM 3010 Food, Beverage and Labor Cost Control Prerequisites HADM 3000, ACCT 2500. This course will focus on the principles of food, beverage, and labor cost controls with emphasis on cost and sales concepts, cost volume profit relationship, food purchasing control, food receiving controls, food sales, production controls, beverage controls, variance analysis, and establishing performance standards. This is a certification course by the American Hotel and Motel Association. 3
HADM 3020 Food and Beverage Production Prerequisites HADM 2010, 30l0. The course will focus on food service systems, including menu management, purchasing and production applied to an operating environment. Laboratory includes demonstration of basic food production techniques, culinary and management principles. Laboratory uniforms are required. (One hour lecture, and three hours laboratory). 3
HADM 3030 Advanced Lodging and Operations Management This course provides opportunity for students to virtually operate a large hotel utilizing simulation software. The simulation software package covers reservations, front office operations, accounting, and housekeeping functions. 3
HADM 3040 Event Planning and Management This course provides students with the concepts and logistics of event planning and management. The course entails marketing, planning costing, executing, and evaluating of events. Students are required to complete and or assist with a major event. 3
HADM 3050 Introduction to Gaming This course explores the history of the gaming industry and functions of casinos in relation to lodging facilities, restaurants, and resorts. This course also provides an overview of legal, social, and economical issues throughout the United States and abroad. 3
HADM 3060 Eco and Cultural Tourism This course is a study of purposeful travel and tourism natural habitats to create an understanding of the cultural and natural history pertaining to the environment. The course emphasizes not altering the ecosystem, while producing economic benefits to local people and governments that encourage the preservation of the inherent resources of the environments locally and elsewhere. Heritage and Cultural tourism sites in North Carolina will be explored. 3
HADM 3070 Resort and Recreational Management The course provides a comprehensive approach to the operations of resort and recreational properties to include the historical aspects, planning, financial investment management, and marketing that deals with the unique nature of the business. The course also addressees the future and impact of condominiums, vacation clubs, technological changes, and the increased cost of energy and transportation status. 3
HADM 3410 Meetings and Convention Management This course introduces students to organization, logistics, and operation of conventions, trade shows, and professional meetings. Emphasis is placed on the methods of marketing, selling, and servicing conventions, professional meetings, and trade shows. 3
HADM 3500 Travel and Tourism Management Prerequisite HADM 2000. This course takes a multidisciplinary look at various issues in present day travel and tourism including tourism destinations and their attractiveness, tourist profiles and destination decisions, space travel, religious travel, new trends in marketing and promotion, and issues facing management from a global perspective. 3
HADM 3700 Leadership Colloquium in Hospitality and Tourism Prerequisite (Junior Standing) An analysis and synthesis of current trends, business practices, and legislative and socioeconomic issues, impacting the hospitality and tourism industry. Students receive training in the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People resulting in a certificate. Executives from the hospitality industry provide students and faculty with insights into senior level managerial decision-making. 2
HADM 3800 Human Resources Management Prerequisites MGT 3000 or FOOD 3520. The study of organizational behavior, selection and placement of personnel, supervision, performance appraisal, wage and salary administration, unionism, employee motivation, communication, and training pertaining to the establishment of an effective employee relations program. 3
HADM 3900 Hospitality Work Experience II Prerequisite HADM 2900. A continuation of HADM 2900. Opportunity for students to continue obtaining professional work experience in the hospitality industry. (This course satisfies the second 250 hours of the 1000 hours of work experience required.) 0
HADM 4010 Entrepreneurship in Hospitality and Tourism This course introduces students to the basic principles of entrepreneurship and franchising opportunities in the hospitality and tourism industry. Emphasis will be on selecting a franchise or development of a startup business. Various franchised hospitality businesses will be analyzed for marketing effectiveness and financial performance. 3
HADM 4100 Research Methods Hospitality and Tourism Prerequisites HADM 1100, 2000, 3500, 3800, EDU 3700. This course introduces students to the research process and various research methods that would be appropriate in the analysis of problems in the hospitality and tourism industry. Basic concepts of research design, instrument development, data collection techniques, sampling issues and the analysis 284 and reporting of data will be reported. 3
HADM 4200 Hospitality Sales and Marketing Prerequisite MKT 3210. An exploration of the design and delivery of a marketing plan for segments of the hospitality industry based on customer services to achieve guest satisfaction and competitive distinctiveness. The application of basic marketing concepts and research methods will be emphasized. 3
HADM 4300 Hospitality Law and Ethics A study of the laws and ethical considerations applicable to the operation of lodging, food service, travel and tourism, and recreation/entertainment enterprises. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of management to employees and guests, host duty at common law, tort concepts, and management liability of hospitality facilities. (Junior/Senior standing) 2
HADM 4400 Hospitality Financial Management Prerequisites ACCT 2500, ECON 2300. This course addresses the generation and analysis of quantitative information for planning, control, and decision making in hospitality enterprises. Financial reports will be examined as tools for analyzing past performance, future projects, and day today decision-making. Students will also conduct a capital expenditure project. 3
HADM 4500 Food Service Production and Operations Prerequisites HADM 2010, 3000, 3010, 3020. This course is a continuation of HADM 3000 Food and Beverage Production. Practical experience is provided in menu planning, food purchasing and quantity cooking methods, the use and care of equipment, sanitation and maintenance, and service techniques as they rotate through various positions commonly found in dinning operations. Laboratory uniform required. (One hour lecture 3 hours laboratory) 3
HADM 4600 Hospitality and Tourism Seminar A capstone course focusing on the application of managerial, leadership, and operational concepts. Students work in groups to undertake a complex problem solving activity in cooperation with a participating hospitality tourism industry organization. A seminar is presented as the final product. (Senior status and permission of the instructor.) 3
HADM 4700 Hospitality Facilities Management requisite HADM 1100, 2010, 3000. This course introduces students to the concept of design, branding, basic engineering and building codes, in relation to hospitality facilities. Students are also introduced to concepts and strategies for securing financial resources. Students are required to complete a facilities design project encompassing design, site appraisal, market research, and budgetary concerns. 3
HADM 4800 Profit Planning and Decision Making Prerequisite HADM 4400. A study of the decision making process involved in the development of profit plans through the use of hospitality industry studies. Emphasis on cash management, cost volume profit analysis, price decisions, volume forecasting, capital budgeting, variance analysis, and tax consideration will be covered. 2
HADM 4900 Hospitality and Tourism Internship This course provides the student with supervised management work experience in lodging, travel and tourism food service or recreationentertainment. Biweekly internet conferences and a comprehensive internship report are mandatory. This course may be taken for variable credits and satisfies 500 hours of the 1000 hours of work experience required. (Senior status) 5
HEDU 1531 Health An interdisciplinary study of health promotion and disease prevention with emphasis on developing lifetime wellness programs. 2
HEDU 2000 Introduction to Health Education This is an introductory course to community and school health education. The basic philosophy, principles and content of health education are discussed as background for suggested solutions to of health problems. 2
HEDU 2100 Community Health This course focuses on concepts of community health, factors influencing community health, and community resources for prevention and elimination of community health problems. Special emphasis is placed on citizens’ responsibilities and participation at the local, state, national and international levels. 2
HEDU 2200 Health Behavior for Effective Living A survey of essential knowledge and practices for personal and community health. Emphasis is placed on emotional optimal well-being, positive health behavior, health risk factors, certain environmental health concerns, and certain organizational resources for public health. Expressed interests and needs of students will also be of vital concern. 3
HEDU 3020 Methods and Applications of Group Leadership for Health Personnel Prerequisite: HEDU 2200 or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on the health professional’s role in working with community groups. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills such as interpersonal communication, diagnosing group difficulties, and intervening to increase the effectiveness of working groups. 2
HEDU 3100 Environmental Health Prerequisites: BIOL 3200, HEDU 2100 or permission of the instructor. This course is designed to provide a general knowledge of principles of environmental health science and their application in the management of certain aspects of the environment, e.g., water resources, excreta and waste waters, air, solid wastes, insects and rodents, food and physical energy. Attention is given to the role of the community resources, including health education, in the promotion of environmental health. 3
HEDU 3210 Foundations of Public Health I: Practices & Epidemiological Principles Prerequisite: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200 or permission of the instructor. The history, philosophy and principles of public health are covered. Special attention is given to the basic organization and practice of public health at local, state, national and international levels. 3
HEDU 3220 Foundations of Public Health II: Practices & Epidemiological Principles Prerequisite: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200, 3210 or with permission of the instructor. This course focuses upon basic epidemiological principles and practices including data collection, analysis, interpretation, evaluation and implications for health education programming. 3
HEDU 3300 Human Sexuality This course provides a broad overview of biological, social, and emotional dimensions of sexuality. It will examine sex roles of men and women in the United States with special emphasis on fostering understanding and tolerance of changing patterns, life styles, and attitudes. 2
HEDU 3310 Health of the School Child This course focuses on the role of the teacher in appraising and promoting the health status of pupils 2
HEDU 3400 Theory and Practice of Health Education Prerequisites: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200 3100, and 3210. The course is a study of theories often used in assessing the need for planning, implementing and evaluating community health education programs. Special attention will be given to the study of theories at the organizational and community levels. 3
HEDU 3420 Principles of School Health This course considers principles of a coordinated school health program. Methods and materials used in teaching health and integrating health with other subject matter areas are included. 3
HEDU 3600 Planning for Health Promotion and Health Education Prerequisites: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200 ,3210, and 3400 or permission of the instructor. An overview of the process for assessing, planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion and health education programs for targeted populations. 3
HEDU 4000 Communicating Health Information: Procedures, Media, and Techniques Prerequisites: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200 and at least one 3000 level course or permission of the instructor. This course focuses on a variety of approaches for communicating health information utilizing multiple channels of communication. Students will design, produce, and utilize educational materials appropriate for use with groups and/or individuals. 3
HEDU 4110 first Aid and Safety This course is designed to develop an understanding of measures essential for the prevention of injury including the role of school safety education. Students are expected to develop skills in applying first aid procedures for victims of injury or sudden illness. 3
HEDU 4113 Methods and Materials in Health Education A component of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education. This course provides opportunities for students to become proficient in their knowledge of content, instructional strategies, media and procedures for teaching health 3
HEDU 4120 Organization and Administration of School and Community Health Programs Prerequisites: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200 3020 3100, 3210, 3220, 3400 3420, 3600, 4000, or permission of the instructor. Principles of organization and administration of health programs in the school and the community at large are covered. Of particular concern in the course are administrative and coordinating functions that can be expected of a health educator in the school or in a community health agency. 3
HEDU 4200 Aging and the Aged: Health Perspectives The course describes characteristics of aging and the aging process. Its major focus is on health problems common to the elderly; measures which may be applied by the individual, families, and society for preventing, coping with, and solving these problems. Current practices in the provision of health care for the elderly are reviewed. 2
HEDU 4213 Directed Teaching of Health Education Prerequisite: HEDU 4113 and a grade point average of 2.5 or above in the field in which licensure is sought. The Directed Teaching component of the Senior Semester is intended to provide opportunities for the student to do teaching under supervision. This course is a component of the Senior Semester in Teacher Education. 6
HEDU 4220 The Senior Seminar: Trends and Directions in Health Education Prerequisites: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200, 3020, 3100, 3210, 3220, 3400, 3420, 3600, 4000, 4300 or permission of instructor. The overall purpose of the seminar is to provide learning activities which provide the opportunity for students to integrate knowledge into a synthesis of the discrete elements including: ideas, concepts, methods, and techniques — in Health Education. 2
HEDU 4300 Research Methods and Evaluation in Health Education Pre-requisites: HEDU 2000, 2100, 2200, 3020, 3210, 3220, 3400, and 3600 or permission of the instructor. This is an introduction to basic research methods and the evaluation of health promotion programs. Students will examine, compare, and contrast qualitative and quantitative approaches to field research and data collection strategies. The course will prepare students for developing and delivering oral and poster presentations. 3
HEDU 4420 field Work in Community Health Education Prerequisites: Completion of all courses required for the major and GPA of 2.5 in health education or approval of the department. The student spends the first part of the semester in a seminar. The second part is spent full- time in field work in a community health agency where opportunities are provided for observing and performing a variety of community health education functions under the supervision of a professional public health educator. A student in field work may not be employed during this eight-week period. 6
HEDU 4500 Independent Study: Special Topics in Health Education Prerequisite: HEDU 1531 or permission of the instructor. This course permits the student to pursue an area of interest in collaboration with a faculty member. The student must demonstrate the capacity to work independently and with limited direction. A final project which meets predetermined learning objectives is required. 6
HEDU 4660 Public Health Policy: Assessment and Advocacy Prerequisites: Introductory coursework in public health education or public administration or permission of the instructor. This course will address a major health issue in the U.S. 3
HEDU 4700 Current Trends in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention This course provides an opportunity for students to examine the “latest” information about current and emerging public health and safety conditions affecting minority communities in the U.S. and globally. Topics will focus on one major area i.e.: cancer, diabetes, overweight and obesity, AIDS, bioterrorism agents, sexually transmitted disease, animal related diseases, among others. Students will attend lectures by researchers and experts in the area of focus and participate in group discussions about the relative importance and impact of these diseases on society, and review best practices for prevention, control, and health care interventions and strategies. Topics vary by semester. 3
HISG 5000 Historical Method and Bibliography An examination of the methods of research used by historians and schools of historical interpretation. 3
HISG 5010 Seminar in European History An investigation of the main trends in the economic and social history of Europe since 1750. Emphasis on the new approaches in the field and current innovative research developments. 3
HISG 5020 Seminar in United States History An investigation of special topics in American history with emphasis on research and dialogue with peers. 3
HISG 5040 Seminar in African History An investigation of special topics in African history with concentration on the research and writing of a peer-critiqued research paper. 3
HISG 5050 Seminar in African American History An investigation of special topics in African American history with emphasis on research and dialogue with peers. 3
HISG 5070 Seminar in the African Diaspora An investigation of special topics in African Diaspora history with emphasis on the research and writing of a peer-critiqued research paper. 3
HISG 5072 Women in the African Diaspora This course is a comparative study of women in the African Diaspora. The course explores the sociocultural constructions of race and the processes of acculturation and resistance among people of African descent in the ‘New World’ and the ‘Old World’. Readings will focus on women in Africa and its Diaspora communities in the Caribbean, Latin America, and North America. Part of this course pays close attention to the leadership strategies of women in the African Diaspora providing opportunities for students to adapt these models for their personal development. 3
HISG 5100 Independent Readings in European History An examination through individuals and independent in-depth readings on some topic in European history. 3
HISG 5130 European History, 1815-1914 An intensive study of the period, 1815-1914. Equal emphasis is placed on economic, political, cultural, and social developments. 3
HISG 5140 European History Since 1914 An intensive study of the political, economic, social, and intellectual developments in Europe since 1914. 3
HISG 5155 Topics in European History, 1750-1870 An analysis of central topics in European history. Particular attention is placed on polemical issues that are the subject of changing historiographical interpretations. 3
HISG 5160 Topics in the Expansion of Europe An examination of the extension of European culture overseas. Special emphasis will be placed on the case studies of Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, the Americas, and the Pacific. 3
HISG 5170 The New Europeans - Race and Ethnic Minorities in Contemporary Europe This course is an examination of the status and experiences of racial and ethnic immigrants in contemporary Europe. The course analyzes the various patterns of movement and settlement of ethnic minorities in Europe during the twentieth century. It also examines how societies responded to their presence and the formation of public policy. Finally, the course addresses significant issues related to Transnational Migration and global race relations. 3
HISG 5200 Independent Readings in American History An examination through Individual and independent in-depth readings on topics in American history. 3
HISG 5210 U.S. History: Colonial Period to the Age of Jackson An in-depth study of different interpretations of the many facets of United States history from colonial times to the "Age of Jackson." 3
HISG 5220 U.S. History: Age of Jackson to 1900 An analysis of varying interpretations and studies of American history 3
HISG 5230 United States Since 1900 An analysis of selected topics dealing with big business; American imperialism; the Progressive Movement; the quest for social justice among American minorities; economic, political, and social patterns in the aftermath of World War I and World War II; internationalism; and the contemporary scene. 3
HISG 5250 American Women’s History An analysis of the History of women in the United States from colonial era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, and political transformations of women and the struggle for equal rights. 3
HISG 5260 American Labor History The course traces the history of American workers and organized labor unions from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between workers and the unions and political and economic developments. 3
HISG 5320 History of North Carolina An intensive study of the historical, political, economic, cultural, and social developments of North Carolina from its colonial beginnings to the present day. 3
HISG 5400 Independent Readings in African History An examination through individual and independent in-depths readings on topics in African history. 3
HISG 5410 History of East and Central Africa A study of the indigenous peoples of eastern and central Africa and their interactions with non-African peoples and cultures. 3
HISG 5420 History of West Africa A study of West African history, including a discussion of the rise of West African states, the effects of the Atlantic slave trade on these states, the history of West Africa during the period of European colonialism, and West African independence. 3
HISG 5440 History of Southern Africa A survey of the peoples and states of southern Africa from the earliest times to the present. Includes a discussion of southern African resistance to the partitioning and colonial rule, white-black conflict, and problems in modern southern Africa. 3
HISG 5460 Independent Africa An examination of some of the problems facing Africa today. Includes a discussion of underdevelopment, urbanization, elitism, Christianity and Islam vs. traditional religion, and education as they affect social change on the continent. 3
HISG 5490 Independent Readings in African History An examination through individual and independent in-depth readings topics in African history. 3
HISG 5500 Independent Readings in African American History An examination through individual in-depth readings on some topic in Afro-American history. 3
HISG 5510 Topics in African American History to 1865 An intensive study of selected topics in African American history to 1865. 3
HISG 5520 Topics in African American History Since 1865 An intensive study of selected topics in African American history since 1865. 3
HISG 5522 The Black Female Body in American Culture This course examines the constructions, representations, forms of appropriation and liberation of the Black female body in cross-cultural, historical and contemporary perspective. Particular attention will be given to examining ways that the intersecting hierarchies of gender, race, class, sexuality and culture shape the treatment of the Black female body. 3
HISG 5530 Black Americans in the Twentieth Century An in-depth study of selected topics in 20th century African American history. 3
HISG 5534 Black Feminist Thought and Feminist Thought The purpose of this course is to examine the history of Black feminist theory and scholarship. The course will explore topical areas in Black feminist and feminist scholarship. It pays particular attention to theoretical perspectives that examine local, national, and international topics that include: the social construction of gender and sexuality; definitions of womanhood; the female body and the politics of representation; comparative feminisms; women’s culture; political and economic expressions; and women’s activism and participation in social transformation will be included. 3
HISG 5536 Black Women and Activism The purpose of this course is to highlight the multiple ways black women activists have shaped United States History. Through this course, students will explore and examine the struggles and accomplishments of Black women activists. The course also examines black women's clubs, groups, and organizations in the hopes of creating a more accurate portrayal of the impact these individuals and groups have had on society. The second half of the course will enable students to see more clearly how black women served as critical agents in uplifting their communities, particularly during tremendous periods of interracial turmoil and heightened group tensions. 3
HISG 5610 Topics in Latin American History An in-depth study of the Latin American struggle for social integration, nationhood, economic independence, democracy, political stability, and diplomatic identity within the Inter-American system. 3
HISG 5625 Caribbean Women in Slavery and Freedom The course will focus on how women’s enslavement differed from that of men, examining labor, economics, and sexuality. It also analyzes the ways in which women helped to craft and defend new Caribbean identities and carve out niches for themselves through autonomous economic activities. 3
HISG 5630 Modern Mexico An examination of Mexico's social, political, and economic history since the time of its independence from Spain to the present, with an emphasis on Mexico's revolution and Mexican-U.S. relations. 3
HISG 5700 Introduction to Oral History The course is designed to encourage students to research, write, and critically think about the components of oral history methodology and documentary techniques. 3
HISG 5710 Introduction to Public History An introduction to the three main features of Public History: people’s history, cultural resource management, and applied history. Emphasis will be placed upon making history usable, accessible, and service-oriented to a broad general public. 3
HISG 5712 Internship in Public History This course explores the essential question of, "What are the opportunities and challenges in the growing field of Public History?" In addition to studying the literature in the field students will find that internships are excellent opportunities to gain hands on experience and identify careers they would like to pursue. 3
HISG 5720 Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts An introduction to the theory and practice of managing archives documents, such as personal papers, institutional records, photographs, electronic records, and other unpublished materials. Topics covered include manuscript and records acquisitions and appraisal, arrangement and description, conservation and preservation, reference, and access. 3
HISG 5722 Archives and Records Management An examination of the responsibilities of archivists and records managers. The course will provide students with an historical foundation for understanding contemporary record-keeping practices. 3
HISG 5724 Archives and the African American Community An examination of the documentation of the African American community; both men and women, family roles, class identities, political conflicts, and gender, racial and ethnic relations. The course will also address legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding archives and the collection of African American historical materials. 3
HISG 5726 Archives Appraisal: Themes, Issues, Scholarship An examination of the theory, polices, and procedures archivists use to identify, evaluate, acquire, and authenticate records and papers, in all formats, which have enduring value to records creators, institutions, researchers, and society. 3
HISG 5728 Archival Arrangement and Description An in-depth analysis of contemporary theories, methodologies, and models for arranging, describing, and providing access to archival documents. 3
HISG 5730 Seminar in Race and Public History - A View from the Diaspora An examination of different ways in which individuals and institutions within indigenous cultures are attempting to understand and reconcile the contested terrains of their historical past within the sensitivity of their own time and culture. Part of the course will examine African American efforts in the United States. A second part is reserved for exploration of historical agency in Africa and the Caribbean. 3
HISG 5736 Collection Management The course is designed to provide students with the necessary skills to develop a collection management plan based on a museum’s institutional mission. The course explores the basic principles of accessioning and deaccessioning artifacts for museum collections; the technical aspects of handling, storing and exhibiting a variety of materials, including registration and cataloging procedures, writing condition reports, and crating and shipping artifacts. 3
HISG 5738 Museum Interpretation An examination of the principles of interpreting history to the public through and analysis of the professional practices of exhibition development for museums and historic sites. 3
HISG 5740 Education and Public Programs An examination of the methods by which museums and historic sites, both public and private, identify and serve their respective communities through educational programming. 3
HISG 5742 Leadership in Museums Administration and Historic Site Management An in-depth study of the basic principles in the administration of museums, historic sites, cultural centers and other cultural institutions. The course will incorporate case studies of museum administrative programs on the local, state, and national level. 3
HISG 5744 History Museum Curators hip - African American Material Culture An examination of the broad areas of historical research as they relate to the collection, preservation and interpretation of African American material culture. The course will provide the necessary skills to employ learned historical methodology within a museum context, especially in the area of object/artifact research and exhibition development. 3
HISG 5891 Thesis Conference/Resident For students who have in-state tuition residency and are completing preliminary steps toward the development of a thesis. The student must enroll in this course every semester from the approval of the thesis topic until the final semester the thesis is completed. 0
HISG 5892 Thesis Conference/Non-Resident For students who have out-of-state tuition residency and are completing preliminary steps toward the development of a thesis. The student must enroll in this course every semester from the approval of the thesis topic until the final semester the thesis is completed. 0
HISG 5900 Graduate Thesis/Project Thesis hours are for the completion of extensive research and writing of an acceptable thesis on an approved topic. Students should register for this course only during the semester that they plan to finish their thesis work. 3
HIST 1100 World Societies to 1650 An examination of the life and history of humans and world societies from the earliest times to A.D. 1650. Fall Semester & Summer Session I. 3
HIST 1320 World Societies A thematic and interdisciplinary study of global, historical, and cultural developments in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe from 1450 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the dynamics of the evolution of modern society by emphasizing religious, intellectual, economic, and political aspects of life and history. 3
HIST 1530 The Black Experience to 1865 An examination of the roles played by people of African descent in the Americas to 1865. Special emphasis on centering people of African descent in the social, religious, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments in the Americas during this period. 3
HIST 1540 The Black Experience Since 1865 An examination of the roles played by people of African descent in the United States since 1865. Special emphasis on centering people of African descent in the social, religious, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments in the United States from 1865 to the present. 3
HIST 2000 Historical Writing and Literature An introduction to historical methods, theories, and bibliographies for undergraduate majors and minors in history and social science. 3
HIST 2080 Problems in the History of Women to 1750 An examination of selected problems in the history of women to 1750. Special attention will be given to changing historical interpretations of race, class, and gender in analyzing women's experiences. 3
HIST 2081 Problems in the History of Women Since 1750 An examination of selected problems in the history of women since 1750. Special attention will be given to changing historical interpretations of race, class, and gender in analyzing women's experiences. 3
HIST 2110 Ancient History An introduction to the history and the ancient civilizations of Africa, Babylonia, and Persia. It is a study of the government and society of Greece and the early Italian peoples. 3
HIST 2120 Medieval History An introduction to the break-up of the Roman Empire. The course discusses the Germanic invasions; and the rise of the Papacy, feudalism, and the manorial system. It examines the rise of nation-states and the developing controversy between church and state. 3
HIST 2210 United States History to 1865 A general survey of U.S. history from the period of discovery, exploration, and settlement to the end of the Civil War. 3
HIST 2220 United States History Since 1865 A general survey of U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing the Industrial Revolution, social and agrarian movements, and aspects of 20th century American history. 3
HIST 2410 African History to 1800 A general survey of African developments before 1800, with a discussion of the rise of African states and the impact of outsiders on the continent. 3
HIST 2420 African History Since 1800 A general survey of African developments since 1800, with a discussion of the dynamics of imperialism as they operated on Africa during the period of the partitioning and subsequent colonization, the rise of African nationalism, the process of decolonization, and the issues facing African states since independence. 3
HIST 2610 Latin American History: The Colonial Period, 1480-1820 A survey of the discovery of the New World, the conquest of the indigenous societies, the processes of cultural transformation, and the independence revolutions of the Latin American colonies. 3
HIST 2620 Latin American History: The National Period A survey of the problems experienced by the independent Latin American nations in their economic, political and social evolution from 1820 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the development of republicanism, capitalism, and nationalism. 3
HIST 2750 Native American Societies and Cultures A study of the history of selected Native American societies and cultures in the Americas. 3
HIST 2890 Methods and Applications in History ,n interdisciplinary study of methods and Applications used by historians. The course will include classroom and community involvement, Such as interviews surveys, and public history projects. 3
HIST 2910 Histories and Societies of South Asia Prior to 1750 This course addresses the development of society, culture and polity in South Asia (i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal). It traces the interactions and tensions between society, culture and polity and covers ancient, and medieval and early modern South Asia. 3
HIST 3010 Problems in European History Prerequisite: At least one European survey course and permission of the instructor. An intensive study of various problems in European history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 3020 Problems in American History Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An intensive study of various problems in American history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 3040 Topics in African History Prerequisite: At least one African survey course and permission of the instructor. An intensive study of the various problems in African history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 3070 Topics in the African Diaspora An intensive study of various topics in the history of the African Diaspora. 3
HIST 3072 Women in the African Diaspora A comparative study of women in the African Diaspora. The course explores the sociocultural constructions of race and the processes of acculturation and resistance among people of African descent in the ‘New World’ and the ‘Old World’. 3
HIST 3100 Independent Readings in European History Prerequisite: At least one European survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination through in-depth readings on some topic or country in European history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 3115 Europe, 1500-1815 An overview of the underlying causes and far-reaching results of the Renaissance and Reformation, the expansion of European powers, the Old Regime, the French Revolution, and Napoleonic Europe. 3
HIST 3118 Europe, 1815-1914 An overview of the revolutionary movements of the 19th century, the growth of nationalism, and the rise of international rivalries. 3
HIST 3145 History of Russia to the Revolution An overview of the development of the political, social, economic, and military ideas of Russia to the Bolshevik Revolution. 3
HIST 3150 History of England to 1688 An overview of the social, intellectual, economic, and political history of England to 1688. 3
HIST 3160 History of England since 1688 An overview of the social, intellectual, economic, and political history of England from the Glorious Revolution to the present. 3
HIST 3180 History of France since the Enlightenment. An overview of the social, political, and economic developments in France from the Enlightenment to the present. 3
HIST 3210 American Military History An examination of the history and evolution of the American military system from colonial times to the present, with a discussion of the early roots of the American military within the context of America's social, economic, and political development. 3
HIST 3220 Recent United States History Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced survey of American history since 1900. 3
HIST 3230 American Urban History Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. A survey of the growth of American urban history from the colonial period to the present, with a discussion of the relationship of urban society to the development of American political, economic, and social history. 3
HIST 3250 American Economic History Prerequisite: At least one American Survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced study of the American economic system from colonial times to the present, with a concentration on how this system is regulated and how it influences individuals, economic growth, politics, and international relations. 3
HIST 3260 American Labor History This course traces the history of American workers and organized labor unions from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction between workers and unions and political and economic developments. 3
HIST 3410 Ancient Africa An in-depth study of the development of Ancient African civilizations and their influence in Africa and the rest of the world. 3
HIST 3420 State Formation in Pre-Colonial Africa An examination of state formation in Africa from the rise of ancient Ghana about 800 to the founding of Islamic states in West and Central Africa in the nineteenth century. 3
HIST 3430 Africa Under Colonial Rule An examination of the policies of European colonial administrations in Africa from the partition in the late nineteenth century to the beginnings of the decolonization movement after World War II. 3
HIST 3440 Africa Since Independence An overview of independent Africa. The course discusses the political, economic ,and social challenges of independence. 3
HIST 3450 African Economic History An advanced study of African economic systems from ancient times to the present with a concentration on how these systems have influenced individuals, states, politics, and international relations. 3
HIST 3500 Independent Readings in African American History Prerequisite: At least one Afro-American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination through in-depth readings on some topic African American history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 3510 African American History to 1865 A survey of African American history from their earliest appearance in America to the end of the Civil War. 3
HIST 3520 African American History Since 1865 A survey of African American history from Reconstruction to the present. 3
HIST 3522 The Black Female Body in American Culture This course examines the constructions, representations, forms of appropriation and liberation of the Black female body in cross-cultural, historical and contemporary perspective. Particular attention will be given to examining ways that the intersecting hierarchies of gender, race, class, sexuality and culture shape the treatment of the Black female body. 3
HIST 3523 Black Feminist Thought and Feminist Thought An examination of the history of Black feminist theory and scholarship. The course will explore topical areas in Black feminist and feminist scholarship. It pays particular attention to theoretical perspectives that examine local, national, and international topics that include: the social construction of gender and sexuality; definitions of womanhood; the female body and the politics of representation; comparative feminisms; women’s culture; political and economic expressions; and women’s activism and participation in social transformation will be included. 3
HIST 3524 Black Women and Activism This course will highlight the multiple ways black women activists have shaped United States History. Through this course, students will explore and examine the struggles and accomplishments of Black women activists. The course also examines black women's clubs, groups, and organizations in the hopes of creating a more accurate portrayal of the impact these individuals and groups have had on society. The second half of the course will enable students to see more clearly how black women served as critical agents in uplifting their communities, particularly during tremendous periods of interracial turmoil and heightened group tensions. 3
HIST 3525 Black Women and Slavery This course is to investigate African American women's history during the colonial era to 1865. The principal focus of the course is to apply analytical frameworks of race, gender and class to understand the life cycles and multiple roles of women of African descent as mothers, daughters, wives, workers and social change agents. Throughout the course, we will utilize a variety of monographs as well as primary source materials to document black women's experiences in slavery. 3
HIST 3527 Black Women in the 20th Century This course explores United States history by centering black women’s experiences within the study of African American and U.S. History. Using African American women’s history as its lens, the course also examines the intersection of race, class, and gender in American society. This course takes a chronological and thematic approach to the study of African American women from the dawn of the twentieth century to the present. Particular themes that will be explored include: the relationship between constructions of race, class and gender; productive and reproductive labor; women’s networks; migration; the gendered meaning of freedom, and issues facing black women in the twentieth century. 3
HIST 3600 Independent Readings in Latin American History Prerequisite: At least one Latin American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination through in-depth readings on some topic or country in Latin American history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 3630 History of Central America An in-depth study of the political, economic, and social developments in Central American countries since 1800 with particular attention to the independent wars, the struggles to achieve nationhood, cultural integration, economic independence, and social democracy. 3
HIST 3710 Introduction to African Diaspora History An introduction to the history of the African Diaspora. An in-depth discussion of the dispersal of people of African descent throughout the world. 3
HIST 3900 Internship in Historical Studies, 1750-1885 in Historical Studies (1-12) A practical hands-on work experience in the historical field. The course integrates academic studies with related and supervised experiences. 12
HIST 3910 South Asia Under British Imperial Rule, 1885-1947 This course uses readings, lectures and films to focus on the British Empire in South Asia (i.e., India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal). It examines imperialism as a cultural, economic and political form of domination and emphasizes historical factors leading to its rise in South Asia. The course utilizes British history in South Asia to contextualize past forms of European imperialism, as well as present forms of global domination. 3
HIST 3920 The Unmaking of the British Empire in India, 1885-1947 This course addresses how India, a seemingly permanent British imperial possession, gained independence after the formation of the Indian National Congress 1885. It examines how decolonization results not only from nationalist pressure but a full range of social, political, and economic factors. 3
HIST 4010 Seminar in European History Prerequisite: At least one European survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced investigation of special topics in European history with emphasis on the writing of a research paper. Critical attention will be given to the development of each research paper via group critique. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4020 Seminar in American History Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced investigation of special topics in American history with emphasis on the writing of a research paper. Critical attention will be given to the development of each research paper via group critique. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4040 Seminar in African History Prerequisite: At least one African survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced investigation of special topics in African history with emphasis on the writing of a research paper. Critical attention will be given to the development of each research paper via group critique. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4050 Seminar in African American History Prerequisite: At least one African-American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced investigation of special topics in African American history with emphasis on the writing of a research paper. Critical attention will be given to the development of each research paper via group critique. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4060 Seminar in Latin American History Prerequisite: At least one Latin American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced investigation of special topics in Latin American history with emphasis on the writing of a research paper. Critical attention will be given to the development of each research paper via group critique. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4070 Seminar in the African Diaspora Prerequisite: At least one survey course in African or Afro-American history or the African Diaspora and permission of the instructor. An advanced investigation of special topics in the African Diaspora with emphasis on the writing of a research paper. Critical attention will be given to the development of each research paper via group critique. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4110 Europe Since 1914 Prerequisite: At least one survey course in European history and permission of the instructor. An advanced survey of the political, economic, social, and intellectual developments of 20th century Europe. 3
HIST 4120 European Diplomatic History, 1879 to the Present Prerequisite: At least one survey course in European history and permission of the instructor. An advanced study of the forces and events which produced World War I and World War II, the role of the United States in European affairs, and the contemporary picture of Europe and the world. 3
HIST 4130 Renaissance, Reformation, and European Expansion Prerequisite: At least one survey course in European history and permission of the instructor. An advanced survey of Renaissance thought and the structure of society at the time; Machiavelli; the European discovery of the New World; and the religious, political, and economic consequences of the Reformation. 3
HIST 4140 The Revolutionary Era and Napoleon Prerequisite: At least one survey course in European history and permission of the instructor. An advanced study of the period from the Enlightenment through the age of Napoleon with special emphasis on the influence of revolutions on western societies. 3
HIST 4150 European Intellectual History Prerequisite: At least one survey course in European history and permission of the instructor. An advanced study of the main philosophical, political, economic, and cultural themes of European history. 3
HIST 4160 The African Presence in Europe Prerequisite: At least one European survey course. An advanced examination of the role of Africans from the continent and peoples of African descent from the United States and the Caribbean in European culture. 3
HIST 4170 The New Europeans - Race and Ethnic Minorities in Contemporary Europe n examination of the status and experiences of racial and ethnic immigrants in contemporary Europe. The course analyzes the various patterns of movement and settlement of ethnic minorities in Europe during the twentieth century. 3
HIST 4200 Independent Readings in American History Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination through in-depth readings on some topic or country in American history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4210 Foreign Relations of the United States Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced survey of the foreign relations of the United States from colonial times to the present. 3
HIST 4230 Constitutional History of the United States Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced survey of the leading decisions of the United States Supreme Court from the period of Chief Justice John Marshall to the present. 3
HIST 4310 History of North Carolina Prerequisite: At least one American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced survey of the historical, political, economic, cultural, and social developments of North Carolina from its colonial beginnings to the present. 3
HIST 4400 Independent Readings in African History Prerequisite: At least one African survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination through in-depth readings on some topic or country in African history. This course, an elective, may be taken up to three times for credit each time. 3
HIST 4450 History of the Making of Contemporary South Africa This course will examine the origins and development of apartheid in South Africa. The focus is to understand the major historical events and people who have shaped the country. It will introduce students to race and ethnic relations, nationalism, racism, industrialization, urbanization, and the emergence of democracy. 3
HIST 4470 History of Pan-Africanism to 1963 Prerequisite: At least one African or Afro-American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced introduction to the attempts by African peoples at conceptual and organizational unity. It traces historically those sentiments and organizations that produced a series of Pan-African movements. 3
HIST 4510 Modern African American History Since 1900 Prerequisite: At least one Afro- American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced overview of 20th century Afro-American social, economic, and political movements and personalities. 3
HIST 4610 History of the Caribbean Prerequisite: At least one Latin American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination of the history of the West Indies with special attention to the various colonial heritages, the commonality of the African heritage, slavery and its abolition, independence movements, economic and political problems, and efforts toward federation. 3
HIST 4620 Latin American Revolution Prerequisite: At least one Latin American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced examination of revolution in Latin America from the perspective of continuity and change. Case studies will be used to explain both the internal and external dimensions of these movements in the context of each country's historical development. 3
HIST 4630 The African Presence in Latin America Prerequisite: At least one Latin American survey course and permission of the instructor. An examination of the role of African peoples in Latin American history and culture from the period of exploration to the present, with special attention to the Portuguese-Spanish slave trade, conditions of slavery, resistance movements, abolition struggles, cultural influences, the integration process, and present racial relations. 3
HIST 4640 Latin American History Through Literature and Film Prerequisite: At least one Latin American survey course and permission of the instructor. An advanced analysis of Latin American culture and society through various approaches aimed at enhancing the historical perspective. It seeks to foster an empathy with an understanding of Latin America's past and present role as a member of the global community. 3
HIST 4755 Topics in African Diaspora History The course is designed to provide each student with an opportunity to research and write on selected topics in African Diaspora history. Students will present the results of their research in short essays and a major research paper. 3
HIST 4810 Oral History-Theory Prerequisite: HIST 2000. An advanced study of the theory of oral history and how to develop and produce oral history studies. 3
HIST 4820 Oral History-Applied Prerequisite: HIST 4810. An advanced study of the application of oral history theory through field work. 3
HIST 4910 Comparative Slavery Prerequisite: At least one survey course in African American or Latin American history. A Comparative study of various slave societies in the Americas. 3
HIST 4940 Fiction, Film and South Asia’s This course addresses how contemporary film and fiction represent South Asia’s past. It combines writings and films to analyze questions about society, economy and power in South Asia. By highlighting such questions, the course explores people, events and historical processes in modern and early modern South Asia. 3
HIST CNC History Concentration History Concentration - See your Academic Advisor for details. 3
HIST SEM History Seminar History Seminar - See your Academic Advisor for details. 3
HLS 3000 Introduction to Homeland Security This course is designed to introduce the student to the scope of issues facing the American public, the private sector and law enforcement on securing the country against threats posed by domestic and international terrorist groups. Threats to American interests abroad will also be analyzed. 3
HLS 3200 Emergency Management and Recovery This course exposes students to emergency management, mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. The course concentrates on the recovery phase, which involves bringing the affected area back to status quo ante and explores how mitigation for the next event ties in with recovery. Included is discussion of eminent domain in the disaster recovery context as well as the roles of federal, state, and local governments. 3
HLS 3500 Infrastructure Protection This course is designed to familiarize the student with the principles of Homeland Security infrastructure protection as outlined in presidential directives, executive orders and federal and state law, court opinions, regulations, policies, and procedures. 3
HLS 4000 Financial Investigations This course will cover the background priorities and laws of the United States in fighting money laundering. Title 18 Sections 1956 and 1957 will be discussed, as well as, the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 170), the Patriot Act and other Federal and United Nations acts. Any additional acts, resolutions, court opinions, or amendments regarding money laundering will also be analyzed and explored. 3
HLS 4200 Transportation Security This course will allow the student the ability to recognize some of the challenges facing transportation security and to formulate possible solutions to address these challenges. Students will examine current security responses by federal, state and local governments, as well as, private industry in the area of aviation, marine, highway and rail safety. 3
HLS 4210 Corporate Private Security This course teaches students with the methods of securing the infrastructure of the United States. The student will have an understanding of all aspects of security, including the ability to identify threat elements to civil aviation operations, transportation, trains, rivers, bridges, and roads. Further the student will be able to apply their knowledge in providing briefings regarding their independent research into the methods utilized in the infrastructure protection by private and corporate security. 3
HLS 4500 Homeland Security Law and Policy Prerequisites HLS3000. This course is designed to give the student an overview of homeland security law and policy. Students will explore emergency response, emergency management, and terrorism after 9112001. 3
HLS 4640 Homeland Security Theory, Policy and Practice Prerequisites HLS 3000, 3200, 3500. This course will serve as a capstone course for the homeland security concentration. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of theory, policy and practice in homeland security through their participation in a project that addresses a contemporary issue in homeland security. Best practices in homeland security will also be discussed. 3
JAPN 1170 Elementary Japanese I The first of a two-semester proficiency-based sequence 3
JAPN 1171 Elementary Japanese II Prerequisite: JAPN 1170 or the equivalent. The second of a two-semester proficiency-based sequence 3
JAPN 2100 Intermediate Japanese I Prerequisite: JAPN 1170, JAPN 1171. Development of skills in spoken and written Japanese with emphasis on listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture. 3
JAZZ 2020 Jazz Combo An instrumental group comprised of a rhythm section 2
JAZZ 2100 Jazz Improvisation Prerequisites: MUSL 1010, 1220, 2210, JAZZ 2250. Theory and actual performance of improvised jazz solo with an emphasis on functional harmony, melodic patterns, modes, and special scales. This course is intended for both instrumentalists and vocalists. Permission of the instructor is required. 2
JAZZ 2250 Jazz Theory I Prerequisites: MUSL 1220, 2110. A study of the basic elements of jazz harmony, including major and minor scales, modes, pentatonic scales, symmetrically altered scales, interval chords, thirteenth chords, polychords, and ear training. 3
JAZZ 2260 Jazz Theory II Prerequisite: JAZZ 2250 with a grade of “C” or higher. A continuation of JAZZ 2250, with special emphasis on five- part harmony, modal harmony, chords voiced in fourths, ear training, and analysis and transcription of jazz solos. 3
JAZZ 3100 Advanced Jazz Improvisation Prerequisite: JAZZ 2100, 2260. A continuation of JAZZ 2100 with emphasis on advanced elements of jazz improvisation 2
JAZZ 4000 History of Jazz A survey of the respective style-periods, performers, composers and stylistic influences in the evolution of jazz. 3
JAZZ 4700 Jazz Arranging Writing jazz arrangements for various combinations of instruments and/or voice. Provision will be made for readings of arrangements by an appropriate ensemble. This course is open to music majors and other students with the permission of the instructor. 3
JAZZ 4730 Jazz Composition Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. The development of compositional techniques in the jazz idiom. 3
MATG 5010 Modern Algebra I Part 1 of a two course study of algebraic systems including groups, rings and fields, vector spaces, and linear algebras, and other algebraic systems. 3
MATG 5020 Modern Algebra II Part 2 of a two course study of algebraic systems including groups, rings and fields, vector spaces, and linear algebras, and other algebraic systems. 3
MATG 5040 Advanced Topics in Geometry A study of topics chosen from Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries using analytic and synthetic approaches. Studies may include topics from finite, projective, algebraic and differential geometries. 3
MATG 5060 Applied Mathematics A study of advanced mathematical techniques as needed in the solution of mathematical models and application problems. Various models and problems will be studied, including those based on differential equations and requiring techniques for solving differential equations. Model formulation, solution evaluation, and interpretation of results will also be incorporated. 3
MATG 5080 Operations Research Prerequisites: MATH 4410. A study of mathematical models and methods for optimal decision-making regarding the usage of constrained analysis, transportation and transshipment problems, assignment models and game theory, dynamic programming, activity networks, Markov chains, queuing theory, and an introduction to simulation. 3
MATG 5210 Theory of Numbers A study of congruences, non-linear congruences, number theoretic functions, primitive roots, quadratic residue, Legendre symbol, Gauss's lemma, quadratic reciprocity law, and the theory of binary forms. 3
MATG 5240 Theory of Groups A study of group properties, subgroups and cyclic groups, normal subgroups, homomorphism and isomorphism theorems, Abelian groups, Sylow's theorems, composition series, and Jordon-Holder Theorem. 3
MATG 5310 Point Set Topology A study of elementary point set theory of the line and the plane, topological spaces and properties, product separation, compactness, connectedness and path connectedness, metrication and compactification, continuous mappings and topological algebra. 3
MATG 5400 Foundations of Mathematics A study of axiomatic set theory, operations on sets, relations and functions, axiom of choice, well ordering, maximal principles, cardinal and ordinal numbers, and the generalized continuum hypothesis. 3
MATG 5410 Numerical Analysis An analysis of errors in approximate calculation, solutions of nonlinear equations, finite differences and interpolating polynomials, numerical differentiation and integration, quadrature in n dimensions, computational methods and error analysis of matrix inversion, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. 3
MATG 5510 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable A study of the real number system, linear point sets, theory of limits, continuity and differentiability properties of functions of one or more variables, sequences and series of functions, Reimann, Lesbesgue, and Stieltjes integrals, implicit function theorem, and existence theorems for differential equations. 3
MATG 5520 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable A study of complex numbers and their geometric representation, analytic functions, elementary functions, complex integration, Taylor and Laurent series, the calculus of residues, conformal mapping, series and product expansion, power series with finite radius of convergence, Abel's theorem and its consequences, and an introduction to transforms. 3
MATG 5640 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations I Prerequisites: MATH 3020 and MATH 4410 or equivalent. An in-depth study of numerical methods for solving parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. Topics include finite difference schemes in one, two, and three dimensions including explicit and implicit methods, as well as variational methods. A detailed discussion of consistency, convergence and stability is covered for each method introduced. 3
MATG 5790 Nonlinear Optimization Prerequisites: COMP 1520, MATH 2030 and MATH 4410. A study of theory and algorithms of finite dimensional nonlinear programming. Topics include first and second order optimality conditions, convergence, rate of convergence, convexity, and duality; unconstrained optimization algorithms including line search, conjugate gradient, Newton, and quasi-Newton methods; constrained optimization algorithms including quadratic programming, sequential quadratic programming, penalty, Lagrangian, and augmented Lagrangian methods. 3
MATG 5810 Special Topics in Mathematics Approval, by the department chairman, is required prior to registering. A course in which content varies from semester to semester. Possible topics include actuarial mathematics, partial differential equations, mathematical logic, and analysis of variance. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits. 3
MATG 5820 Independent Study Approval, by the department chairman, is required prior to registering. Independent research under the direction of a professor. The faculty mentor directs the study and assesses the student’s knowledge through oral and written reports. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 3
MATG 5890 Supervised Research Before registering, the student must submit an outline of the proposed research for approval by the faculty member who will supervise the work and by the department chairman. An advanced study, using the research facilities of the department, under the supervision of a professor in the department. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits. 3
MATG 5900 Thesis Before registering, the student must submit an outline of the proposed research for approval of the faculty member who will supervise the thesis , approval by the student's thesis committee, and by the department chairman. Students should register for this course during the semester in which they intend to complete thesis research and writing. A minimum of 3 credits in MATG 5900 is required for graduation. 6
MATH 1000 Introductory College Algebra Prerequisite: Credit is not allowed if a student has prior credit in any other mathematics course. Required of all freshmen who did not make a satisfactory grade on the placement test. Math 1000 provides preparation for Math 1070 and Math 1100 and does not count as credit toward graduation. The course will review basic algebra, including evaluation of algebraic expressions, factoring, radicals, exponents, fractional expressions, solutions of linear equations, polynomials and word problems. Students will use technology-based learning resources as well as problem sessions/tutoring led by competent student assistants, as a supplement to regular class instruction, in order to gain skills and improve their knowledge of course concepts. 3
MATH 1070 College Algebra Concepts: Modeling with Technology Not open to students with credit in MATH 1100. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1000 or placement by University Testing. A college algebra technology-based course using computer spreadsheets and TI-83 graphics calculator. Spreadsheets, charts, tables, and graphs are used extensively to develop and visually enhance problem- solving skills. Topics include linear, quadratic, cubic, logarithmic and exponential models and applications; various types of regression models and statistical data analyses; inequalities and system of equations; scientific, social, and business models and applications; combinations, permutations, and binomial expansions; some probability and statistics; and TI programming. 3
MATH 1100 College Algebra and Trigonometry I Not open to student with credit in MATH 1070. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1000 or placement by University Testing. The first of a two-course sequence in college algebra and trigonometry designed for students planning to take calculus. Topics include fractional expressions, exponents and radicals, equations and inequalities of linear and quadratic types, functions and graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and the binomial theorem. 3
MATH 1110 College Algebra and Trig I 3
MATH 1200 College Algebra and Trigonometry II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1100. A continuation of MATH 1100 with trigonometry, including simultaneous equations, graphical solution of systems of inequalities, polynomial equations and functions, sequences and series, trigonometric functions, analytical trigonometry, right angle trigonometry, and the laws of sines and cosines. 3
MATH 1210 finite Mathematics Prerequisite C or better in MATH 1070 or1100. An introduction to sets, counting principles, the theory of probability, systems of linear equations and inequalities, vectors and matrices, and linear programming with applications involving optimization utilizing the simplex procedure. 3
MATH 1410 Pre-Calculus Mathematics Prerequisite: Permission of department. An intensive course in pre-calculus mathematics including structure of the real number system, fundamental concepts of algebra, the elementary functions and their graphs, inequalities, theory of equations, complex numbers, the binomial theorem, and trigonometric functions, analytical trigonometry, applications of trigonometry and mathematical induction. 5
MATH 2000 Calculus for Non-Science Majors Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1100. An intuitive treatment of the calculus, including functions, limits, continuity, the techniques of differentiation and an introduction to integration. Applications to business and economics, the life sciences and the behavioral sciences. 3
MATH 2002 Concepts of the Real Number System I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1100 and 1200. A two- semester sequence in fundamental concepts and the structure of the real number system and its subsystems presented from an arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric point of view. These courses are for students who are majoring in elementary or middle school education. 3
MATH 2003 Concepts of the Real Number System II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2002. A two-semester sequence in fundamental concepts and the structure of the real number system and its subsystems presented from an arithmetic, algebraic, and geometric point of view. These courses are for students who are majoring in elementary or middle school education. 3
MATH 2005 Foundations of Geometry Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1100. Fundamental concepts of geometry, including those concepts which form the core of geometric knowledge, the axioms which develop geometric intuition and insight, and the formulation of deductive subsystems. Geometric ideas will be illustrated in practical settings. This course is for students who are majoring in elementary or middle school education. 3
MATH 2010 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1200 or 1410, or permission of the department. An introduction to the differential and integral calculus with analytic geometry including functions, limits, continuity, methods and applications of differentiation 5
MATH 2020 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2010. Theory and technique of integration with applications, differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, numerical integration methods, improper integrals, bounded growth models, separable, first order differential equations, polar coordinates, parametric representations, and analytic geometry in the plane. 5
MATH 2030 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2020. An introduction to Multivariable calculus, partial derivatives with applications to special partial differential equations, double and triple integrals with applications, and analytic geometry in space. Vectors and parametric equations in space, infinite sequences and series, including power series, Taylor series with remainder, and applications. 3
MATH 2400 Introduction to Statistics for Science Majors Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 1100, 1410, or 2010. A study of key concepts in statistics and probability: combinatorics, probability laws, random variables, and distributions. Includes the fundamental tools of statistics: data collection, graphical and numerical methods for describing data, experimental design, simple regression and correlation, categorical data analysis, and statistical inference. 3
MATH 2500 Statistical Methods Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 1100, 1410, or 2010. An applications oriented study of statistical methods, including analysis of variance, linear and multiple regressions, hypothesis testing and sampling techniques. Assignments involve extensive use of SAS, SPSS, or other computer statistical packages. 3
MATH 3020 Differential Equations Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2020. A study of elementary ordinary differential equations. Topics include solutions of linear and non-linear differential equations, power series solutions, systems of differential equations and computer based numerical techniques with applications. 3
MATH 3100 Supervised Laboratory Experiences Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. A program of experiences designed to provide the student with competence in mathematics teaching skills as well as an overview of the mathematics teaching profession. Experiences will include classroom discussions, simulated teaching experiences, observations, and weekly participation in teacher-aide and tutorial activities in local secondary schools. May not be used to satisfy a mathematics elective requirement. 3
MATH 3410 Numerical Analysis Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 2020 and knowledge of a programming language. A computer-based introduction to numerical analysis illustrated by examples from a number of different scientific fields. Topics include solutions of linear and non-linear equations, Eigen value computation, curve fitting, interpolation theory, numerical integration, differentiation and solution of differential equations. 3
MATH 3500 Elementary Number Theory Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2030. A study of the properties of the integers including: Well ordering, the axiom of mathematical induction, divisibility, unique factorization, Diophantine equations, congruences, the Chinese remainder theory, number theoretic functions, Euler’s and Wilson’s theorem, perfect numbers, and quadratic residues. 3
MATH 3910 Undergraduate Honors Seminar Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of the department. A guided research seminar intended for mathematics majors. Students learn techniques for solving challenging problems, write mathematical proofs, investigate selected topics in mathematics, and participate in ongoing research. Includes individual or team projects and oral presentations. Students must devote three research hours of work per week for each semester credit hour and must produce a written report on their project 3
MATH 4100 Introduction to Geometries Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2030. An introduction to non-Euclidean geometries, axiom systems of Euclidean geometry, plane projective geometry, geometry as the study of the invariant theory of a transformation group and sub geometries of projective geometry. 3
MATH 4200 History of Mathematics Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2010. A survey of the history of mathematics with emphasis on selected topics of interest to secondary teachers; topics include algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. May not be used to satisfy a mathematics elective requirement. 3
MATH 4210 Introduction to Probability and Statistics I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2020. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence methods, regression analysis, techniques of experimental design and non parametric methods. 3
MATH 4220 Introduction to Probability and Statistics II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2020. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence methods, regression analysis, techniques of experimental design and non parametric methods. 3
MATH 4310 Advanced Multivariable Calculus I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2030. The algebraic and topological properties of the real number system; Euclidean n-space as a linear vector space and as a metric space; norms; limits; continuity and differentiability properties of functions of several variables; integration; convergence; vector calculus; line and surface integrals; the theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss; curvilinear coordinates; implicit and inverse function theorems; transformation mappings; and Jacobians. 3
MATH 4320 Advanced Multivariable Calculus II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2030. The algebraic and topological properties of the real number system; Euclidean n-space as a linear vector space and as a metric space; norms; limits; continuity and differentiability properties of functions of several variables; integration; convergence; vector calculus; line and surface integrals; the theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss; curvilinear coordinates; implicit and inverse function theorems; transformation mappings; and Jacobians. 3
MATH 4410 Linear Algebra I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2020. Computation infinite dimensional vector spaces, including linear transformations, matrix algebra, solution of linear systems, inner products, bilinear and quadratic forms, diagonalization of symmetric matrices, and applications. 3
MATH 4420 Linear Algebra II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4410. A continuation of MATH 4410 with emphasis on the theory of linear transformations and finite dimensional vector spaces. 3
MATH 4430 Abstract Algebra I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4410. A two-semester sequence of study of algebraic structures. Includes theory and applications involving groups, rings, fields, modules over principal ideal domains and Galois theory. 3
MATH 4440 Abstract Algebra II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4410. A two-semester sequence of study of algebraic structures. Includes theory and applications involving groups, rings, fields, modules over principal ideal domains and Galois theory. 3
MATH 4520 Topics in Applied Mathematics Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 3020 and 4410. An introduction to analytic methods of applied mathematics, model building with computer utilization; illustrative examples and case studies chosen from a wide range of areas of application. 3
MATH 4530 Operations Research Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4410. Mathematical models and methods for decision-making. Topics chosen from: linear programming, dynamic programming, game theory, and queuing theory. 3
MATH 4610 Introductory Real Variable Theory I Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4320. The real number system, metric spaces, topology, limits, and continuity in Euclidean space, functions of bounded variation. Riemann- Stieltjes integrals, series of functions and series expansion, derivatives, Lebesque integration. 3
MATH 4620 Introductory Real Variable Theory II Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4320. The real number system, metric spaces, topology, limits, and continuity in Euclidean space, functions of bounded variation. Riemann- Stieltjes integrals, series of functions and series expansion, derivatives, Lebesque integration. 3
MATH 4630 Introductory Complex Analysis Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 4310. Algebra and geometry of the complex numbers, analytic functions, integrals, power series, residues, poles, conformal mapping, contour integration, analytic continuation and multivalued functions, boundary value problems and integral theorems. 3
MATH 4800 Introductory Topology Prerequisites: C or better in MATH 4320 and 4410. Metric spaces, topologies, derived spaces and continuity, the separation axioms, convergence, nets and filters, covering principles, compactness, connectedness, metrication and compactification. 3
MATH 4900 Independent Study I Prerequisite: Permission of department. Independent research under the guidance of a professor. The faculty mentor directs the study and assesses the student’s knowledge through oral and written reports. Repeatable for credit. Departmental approval is required for registration. 3
MATH 4910 Independent Study II Prerequisite: Permission of department. Independent research under the guidance of a professor. The faculty mentor directs the study and assesses the student’s knowledge through oral and written reports. Repeatable for credit. Departmental approval is required for registration. 3
MATH 4920 The Senior Seminar in Mathematics Prerequisite: senior classification and MATH 3020 and 4410 with grades of C or better. An introduction to mathematical research and mathematical modeling through problem solving activities. Through individual and group projects, students will participate actively in the entire modeling process and undertake investigations of challenging problems chosen from a variety of areas of the mathematical sciences. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. 3
MATH 4930 Topics in Mathematics Prerequisite: permission of department. Content varies from semester to semester. Interested students must consult the instructor or department chair prior to enrolling. Possible topics include actuarial mathematics, partial differential equations, mathematical logic, analysis of variance, and other advanced topics. 3
MATH 4940 Cooperative Education Prerequisite: permission of department. Through cooperative arrangements between the University and an employer, the student may receive credit for on-the-job instruction which contributes to the student’s education and employability as a mathematician. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Department approval is required for registration. May not be used to satisfy a mathematics elective requirement. 3
MGT 1100 Professional Development I This course, the initial professional development course for School of Business students, addresses the importance of peripheral skills and competencies in becoming a management professional and in securing and maintaining employment. It includes discussions of the following topics speaking and writing effectively the importance of introspection in the job search process (including internships, cooperative education assignments, and full time employment) resumes cover letters dressing appropriately ethics and life style changes implicit in becoming a management professional. 1
MGT 2100 Professional Development II Prerequisite MGT 1100 and sophomore classification. This course, the second in the series of professional development courses for School of Business students, continues and builds upon the foundations laid in the Professional Development I course. In addition, it addresses the following topics establishing a framework for business communications exploring business communications concepts organizing and composing messages (including document formats and layout guidelines) developing career planning and placement goals developing portfolios and developing internship search strategies. Students will be introduced to more sophisticated work place interpersonal and communications issues and concerns and expected to refine further the skills and competencies developed and refined in Professional Development I, especially their writing and oral communications skills. 2
MGT 2110 Business Communications 3
MGT 3000 Organization and Management Prerequisite SOCI 2000. Approximately 40 percent of this management foundation course will focus on fundamentals and principles of management another 40 percent will concentrate on organizational behavior and the remaining 20 percent will concern human resource management, including topics such as recruiting, training, and performance appraisal. 3
MGT 3100 Professional Development III Prerequisite MGT 2100 and junior classification. This course, the third in the series of professional development courses for School of Business students, continues and builds upon the foundations laid in the Professional Development I and II courses. In addition, it addresses the following topics ethics writing good news, routine, goodwill, and persuasive messages writing memoranda electronic communication developing and refining career planning and placement goals refining portfolios and developing permanent placement job search strategies. Students will address even more sophisticated real world work place inter personal and communications issues and concerns and refine even further the skills and competencies developed and refined in Professional Development I and II. 2
MGT 3250 International Business Prerequisites MGT 3000, ECON 2200. The primary objective of this course is to effectively and systematically analyze the various institutional facets of the global business environment and their effect on the operations of firms. Globalization remains one of the most criticized and visible phenomena in recent decades. What problems do managers face while trying to exploit opportunities and address challenges in the global business environment This course examines the institutional environment of global business, trade theory particularly in the light of political relations, foreign direct investment, supranational institutions that influence trade and investment, and monetary systems. Attention is also devoted to country and analysis, political risk and contemporary issues such as ofshoring, corporate social responsibility and sustainability. 3
MGT 3400 Business Communications 2
MGT 3700 Organizational Behavior Prerequisite MGT 3000. This course provides an overview of topics and concepts in the field of Organizational Behavior (OB). Emphasis is on developing a theoretical grasp of issues and problems and an understanding of practical implications of various theories of human behavior at work. Specific topics include leadership, motivation, teamwork, career issues, work roles, job enrichment, employee participation, and communication. 3
MGT 4100 Professional Development IV Prerequisite MGT 3100 and senior classification. This course, the final in the series of professional development courses for School of Business students, continues and builds upon the foundations laid in the previous three professional development courses. In addition, it addresses the following topics ethics career planning goals and taking charge of your career identifying and cultivating job mentors navigating the maze of office politics how to manage the boss conflict resolution negotiations understanding the report process and research methods organizing and preparing reports and proposals and designing and delivering business presentations. Students will refine even further the skills and competencies developed and refined in the prior professional development courses. 2
MGT 4510 Human Resource Management Prerequisite MGT 3000. This course examines the role of the human resource professional as a strategic partner in managing today's organizations. Key functions such as recruitment, selection, development, appraisal, retention, compensation, and labor relations are examined. Implications of legal and global environments are appraised and current issues as diversity training, sexual harassment policies, and rising benefit costs are analyzed. Best practices of employers of choice are considered. 3
MGT 4550 Entrepreneurship and Venture Management Prerequisites ACCT 2400, MGT 3000, MKT 3210 . This course examines the initiation and management of an entrepreneurial venture. Topics considered include the innovative idea, venture ideas, perspectives on entrepreneurship, startup sequences, and acquisitions. Students work with a practicing entrepreneur in developing a business plan. 3
MGT 4700 Strategic Business/ Computer Management 3
MGT 4740 Strategic Management Prerequisites Senior classification, CIS 2400, MGT 3000, FIN 3200, MKT 3210. This is the capstone course for graduating seniors. It focuses on corporate and divisional policy formulation and implementation. The knowledge and techniques learned in earlier courses will be applied in an integrated fashion to the process strategic decision making and organizational change. Among the topics considered in the course will be the relationships of organizations to their environments, the hierarchy of organizational objectives, structured as well as informal approaches to strategic planning, the integration of business functions, organizational structure, and policy implementation and evaluation. A significant aspect of the course is devoted to assessing the competitive dynamics of firms. 3
MGT 4801 Field Work Prerequisite Approval of lead professor. A course open to students in the Cooperative Education Program. 4
MGT 5560 Behavioral and Management Theory and Analysis This course is intended to increase the student's capacity for effectively utilizing human resources within a variety of organizational frameworks. Basic concepts such as perception, motivation, communication, conflict, and change are discussed and applied to the manager's decision making and action taking roles. 3
MGT 5565 Management Strategy and Policy Analysis This course is to be taken in the graduating semester. Analytical techniques and concepts are applied to policy formulation and implementation in a complex computer-simulated organization and environment. 3
MKT 3210 Principles of Marketing Prerequisites SOCI 2000, ECON 2200 or ECON 2300. The major objective is to develop in the student the ability to analyze marketing problems and to provide an introduction to that sector of business activity concerned with the distribution of products to business and consumers. The course describes the background and framework of the marketing structure of modern business organizations. 3
MKT 3310 Business Ethics Business Ethics is concerned with the analysis and application of moral principles and norms or the clarification of dilemmas of managers and other employees who make business decisions. 3
MKT 3350 Promotion Management Prerequisite MKT 3210. This course will study promotion as persuasive communication. It will examine promotion management and its relationship to the overall marketing program. Primary emphasis will be placed on advertising, sales promotion, and personal selling. 3
MKT 3450 Consumer Behavior Prerequisite MKT 3210. This course includes an examination of the effects of personality, motivation, perception, learning, attitudes, cultural and social influences, and lifestyle changes on buying situations and how analysis of these factors enables the marketing manager to improve customer satisfaction. Sociological, psychological, and economics models will be considered. 3
MKT 4050 Professional Selling Prerequisite MKT 3210. This course focuses on selling competencies, and the process of making informative and persuasive verbal presentations including presenting materials and formats, handling objectives, closing sales, and servicing customers. 3
MKT 4150 Sales Management Prerequisite MKT 3210. This is a study of the principles of persuasion as applied to the science and art of selling. Emphasis will be upon the sales managers functions of organization, selection, training, and supervision of the sales force. 3
MKT 4250 Retailing Prerequisite MKT 3210. A survey course embracing the principles and practices of retail operations including location and layout, buying, pricing, promotion, credit, and stock control. The course will primarily take a midmanagement approach. 3
MKT 4350 Industrial Marketing Prerequisite MKT 3210. This is a study of the marketing of materials, equipment, and supplies to manufacturers, other business firms, and institutions that use purchased goods in further production. 3
MKT 4450 International Marketing Prerequisite MKT 3210. This course covers the planning and organizing for international marketing operations. It identifies the differences in market arrangements and the differences in the legal, cultural, and economic factors in various countries. 3
MKT 4650 Marketing Research Prerequisites MKT 3210, DSC 3300. This course examines research methods and procedures for the conduct of studies leading to marketing decisions. Techniques of gathering and analyzing data related to advertising, sales, pricing, product, and distribution. Actual participation in the conduct of research studies in these areas will also be provided. 3
MKT 4690 Marketing Seminar Prerequisites MKT 3350, MKT 4150. This course will allow students to both uncover and study current marketing problems. Emphasis will be upon the topics of interest as defined by the individual marketing student. 3
MKT 5570 Marketing Strategy This course is intended to increase the student's capacity for effectively utilizing human resources within a variety of organizational frameworks. Basic concepts such as perception, motivation, communication, conflict, and change are discussed and applied to the manager's decision making and action taking roles. 3
MSCM 2400 Introduction to Mass Communication: Structure and Social Impact Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Introduction to the role of mass communication in society and to the structure, function, and social impact of the communications media. Extensive discussion of media institutions, theories, practices, professional fields, and effects on society, groups, and individuals. 3
MSCM 2430 Mass Media and Society Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Examination of the mass media in relation to social institutions, public opinion, and government. Includes issues such as media violence, socialization, and entertainment. 3
MSCM 2440 Reporting and Writing for Mass Media Prerequisite: ENG 1210. A study of the techniques and tools for gathering and reporting the news and an introduction to news writing with emphasis on the organization and development of news stories. 3
MSCM 2460 Mass Media and American Popular Culture Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Exploration of the relationship between mass media and popular culture; introduction to techniques of media analysis and consideration of the aesthetics of such cultural artifacts as best-selling fiction and television comedies. 3
MSCM 2470 Diversity and the Media Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400. An examination of the portrayal of minorities in the mass media with emphasis on African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. Also focuses on the history of the minority media and the ways minority groups have produced media to meet their needs. 3
MSCM 2480 New Technologies and Society Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400. A survey of developing telecommunication systems and technologies, such as optical/digital technologies, and how they affect traditional electronic media and society. Explores the social practices and communicatory processes that new technologies encourage and subvert. 3
MSCM 3450 History of Mass Communication Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Examination of the emergence of the free press, including the African American press, and the development of mass media in the United States. Study of the technical, cultural, political and economic forces that have shaped mass media in our society. 3
MSCM 3460 International Communication Prerequisite: ENG 1210. An exploration of issues and implications of international information flow and of the uses of media 3
MSCM 3500 Introduction to Film Criticism Prerequisite: ENG 1210. Introduction to the study of cinema aesthetics with emphasis on film history, genres and African American film. 3
MSCM 3505 Photojournalism Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400. Introduction to the visual and technical aspects of 35mm and digital photojournalism. Practical experience in photographing general news events, sports, features, and other standard newspaper subjects. 3
MSCM 3510 Advanced Reporting Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440. Practice in gathering and writing news for the mass media with particular emphasis on developing the student’s news judgment and writing skills. Attention to detailed reporting and interpretation, field assignments, team reporting, and computer-assisted reporting. 3
MSCM 3520 Copy Editing Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440. A study of the tools and techniques of modern editing, with emphasis on the editor’s role in a desktop publishing environment. Designed to provide experience with every stage of the copy flow from copy editing to final paste-up. Includes units on media law and ethics. 3
MSCM 3525 Desktop Publishing Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440. Introduction to graphic design techniques in newsletters, magazines and newspapers. The focus of the course is to practice skills necessary for layouts and graphics from conception to finished product using desktop publishing and photo editing software. 3
MSCM 3540 Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440. Practice in researching, developing and organizing, and writing feature articles for newspapers and magazines, as well as analysis of style and trends in newspaper and magazine feature stories. 3
MSCM 3560 Writing for Radio and Television Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400. Introduction to writing news and public affairs copy for broadcast media, public service announcements, radio and television commercials, broadcast continuity, and dramatic programs. 3
MSCM 3570 Audio Production Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 3560. Introduction to the basic principles of audio production, including the operation of studio equipment and the writing, producing, and presenting of programs. 3
MSCM 3580 Video Production Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 3560. Introduction to the fundamentals of small-systems video production. A study of the basic techniques of television studio and field production. Topics include camera use, lighting, sound in television production, producing, directing and editing. 3
MSCM 3590 Public Relations Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440. Study of the theory and practice of public relations. Analysis of public relations as a communication function of organizations. 3
MSCM 3600 Internship in Mass Media Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400. Approval by a faculty committee and a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in English courses and 2.6 overall are also required. A guided internship in the mass media that will give students experience needed for career planning and development. 3
MSCM 3610 Issues in Media Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2430. A seminar on selected topics in contemporary media studies. 3
MSCM 4530 Introduction to Video 3
MSCM 4600 Mass Communication Theory and Research Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400, 2430. A study of the development and scope of mass communication theory. Analysis of social/behavioral and critical/cultural approaches to mass communication theory. Study of the use and analysis of research in mass communication. 3
MSCM 4610 Communication Law and Ethics Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400. A study of legal and ethical issues relating to the practice of mass communication; study of constitutional guarantees, freedom and responsibility of the press, libel law, rights of privacy, professional standards and industry self-regulation. 3
MSCM 4620 Media Practicum Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400, 2440. Guided on- the-job training with on-campus media and organizations. Choice of workplace depends on concentration. 3
MSCM 4625 Advanced Audio Production Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400, 3580. Advanced analysis and application of the principles and methods of audio production, with emphasis on studio technique. 3
MSCM 4635 Advanced Video Production Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400, 3580. Advanced analysis and application of the principles and methods of video production, with emphasis on creative and technical skills required for preparing media programs. A hands-on, project-based approach to video production offering basic instruction in digital video production and editing. 3
MSCM 4640 Corporate and Institutional Video Prerequisites: ENG 1210. MSCM 2440, 3580. Application of video and computer technology in training, employee relations, public relations, and other non-broadcast applications. 3
MSCM 4641 Documentary Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400 and 3560 or 3570 or 3580. Workshop in the production of audio and/or video nonfiction or documentary projects. The course focuses on narrative, representational, and aesthetic strategies of documentary production. Students produce a documentary 3
MSCM 4645 Public Issues Reporting Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440. An advanced study of reporting on public issues, with emphasis on government, the courts, and public agencies and special problems, such as race relations, ecology, welfare and tax reform, minority rights and consumerism. Attention to detailed reporting and interpretation. 3
MSCM 4650 Independent Study Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2440 and permission of the instructor. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in English courses and 2.6 overall are also required. A specialized critical and detailed study of problems in mass communication. 3
MSCM 4670 Media Management Policies Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400, 2440. A study of management of media organizations, especially small daily and weekly newspapers, including an analysis of problems of the African American press and electronic media. Attention to community relations and public service issues. 3
MSCM 4680 Internship in Mass Media II Prerequisites: ENG 1210, MSCM 2400, ENGM 3600. Approval by a faculty committee and a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in English courses and 2.6 overall are also required. A guided internship in the mass media that will give students experience needed for career planning and development. 3
MUSL 1000 Survey of Music A course designed to acquaint the general college student with the role of music in Western culture. Emphasis is placed upon musical form and style since 1600. 3
MUSL 1001 Hip Hop in Context WI Hip Hop in Context examines the cultural phenomenon through its history, development, communication style, dance form, music, and artistic process. Throughout the course students will explore the dynamics of race, gender, youth, and class. The course will employ various sources for analysis and information including: videos, commercials, movies, songs and other multimedia sources. 3
MUSL 1010 Fundamentals of Music A study of basic terminology, scales, intervals, sight-singing and ear training. Required of all music majors and minors unless exempted by examination. 3
MUSL 1050 Secondary Class Piano I Secondary piano class for music majors designed to provide prospective public school teachers with the basic proficiency required for state licensure. 1
MUSL 1060 Secondary Class Piano II Prerequisite: MUSL 1050 with a grade of “C” or higher. A continuation of MUSL 1050. 1
MUSL 1070 Intermediate Secondary Class Piano I Prerequisite: MUSL 1060 with a grade of “C” or higher. A continuation of MUSL 1060. 1
MUSL 1080 Intermediate Secondary Class Piano II Prerequisite: MUSL 1070 with a grade of “C” or higher. A continuation of MUSL 1070. Required of all music students who have not passed the proficiency examination. 1
MUSL 1220 Harmony I Prerequisite: MUSL 1010 or the equivalent, with a grade of “C” or higher. A study of diatonic harmony: triads, dominant seventh chords, inversions, and chord progressions. 3
MUSL 1230 Diction for Singers: English and Italian A study of English and Italian as applied to singing. Students will perform songs in both languages in class. 1
MUSL 1240 Diction for Singers: French and German A study of French and German as applied to singing. Students will perform songs in both languages in class. 1
MUSL 1260 Voice Class Fundamentals of singing for voice majors and non- majors, with emphasis on tone production, diction and interpretation, and a survey of literature for the solo voice with emphasis on performance. 2
MUSL 1300 Twentieth-Century Music An introduction to music written since 1900, both popular and classical, with special emphasis on most recent developments. 2
MUSL 1510 Marching/Symphonic Band For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1511 Marching/Symphonic Band For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1520 University Choir For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1521 University Choir For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1530 Concert Choir For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1531 Concert Choir For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1540 String Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1541 String Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1545 Guitar Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1546 Guitar Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1550 Woodwind Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1551 Woodwind Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1560 Brass Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1561 Brass Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1570 Jazz Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1571 Jazz Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1580 Small Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1581 Small Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1590 Percussion Ensemble For non-music majors. May be repeated for credit. 2
MUSL 1591 Percussion Ensemble For music majors only. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 1600 Workshops and Recitals Required of all music majors. Laboratory for Applied Primary courses. 0
MUSL 1700 Class Guitar I This course offers beginning instruction on an acoustic guitar to students who have little or no background in either guitar or music. Students will learn the fundamentals of music, chords, guitar notation, strumming and instrumental techniques for accompanying and playing traditional and contemporary songs. 2
MUSL 1710 Class Guitar II Prerequisite: MUSL 1700. Offers intermediate guitar instruction to the non-major. Students will learn the use of secondary chords, moveable 2
MUSL 2000 Keyboard Improvisation Prerequisites: MUSL 1010, 1050, 1060 and 1220. An introduction to chord and scale types and their application to jazz, gospel, and other forms of improvisational music. 2
MUSL 2110 Ear Training and Sight Singing I Prerequisite: MUSL 1010 with a grade of “C” or higher. Sight-singing of diatonic material, with attention given to melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic singing and dictation. 2
MUSL 2120 Ear Training and Sight Singing II Prerequisite: MUSL 2110 with a grade of “C” or higher. Continuation of MUSL 2110. 2
MUSL 2210 Harmony II Prerequisites: MUSL 1220, 2110 with a grade of “C” or higher. A continuation of diatonic harmony and the study of chromatic harmony in written exercises, keyboard harmony, and analysis with an introduction to counterpoint. 3
MUSL 2220 Harmony III Prerequisites: MUSL 2210 with a grade of “C” or higher. 3
MUSL 2405 Introduction to Music Literature (WI) Prerequisite: first-year theory courses, their equivalent or permission of the instructor. Primarily designed for the music major as an introduction to a selected body of world music literature and various structural genres, stressing basic elements such as formal and stylistic concepts. Its purpose is to lay the foundation of analytical and critical skills necessary for the subsequent required courses in music history and literature. 2
MUSL 2450 Introduction to Brass and Woodwind Instruments Principles of tone production, articulation, playing positions, fingerings, and pedagogy related to woodwind and brass instruments, as well as the selection and care of instruments, mouthpieces and reeds. Each student will play at least one woodwind and one brass instrument. This is a required course for keyboard and voice majors seeking NC state licensure. 2
MUSL 2800 Music in the United States A historical and stylistic survey of music in America from pre-colonial times to the present day. Open to non-music majors. 3
MUSL 2850 Music for the Stage Prerequisite: HUM 2410. A study of the many genres which represent a fusion of drama and music 3
MUSL 2860 Music for the Orchestra Prerequisite: HUM 2410. A survey of literature for symphony orchestra and various small instrumental groupings from the 18th century to the present. Open to non-music majors. 3
MUSL 2930 Independent Study I Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3
MUSL 3000 Commercial Music Prerequisites: MUSL 2210, 2220. Techniques of composing and arranging for radio, television and motion pictures. Students will be expected to write examples of all three media. 2
MUSL 3110 Ear Training and Sight Singing III Prerequisite: MUSL 2110, 2120. Advanced sight-singing, including melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation from advanced manuals and performance repertoire. 1
MUSL 3200 Gospel Music Prerequisites: MUSL 1050, 1060 and 2000. A study of periods and stylistic developments in jazz and gospel music, including appropriate improvisational techniques and scoring for varied groups. 3
MUSL 3210 Service Playing Prerequisite: MUSL 2000. Techniques and materials used in church service playing, including improvisation, modulation, accompanying and sight-reading. 2
MUSL 3300 Piano Class I Group instruction in piano designed to develop fundamental technical knowledge of the keyboard. Functional skills for the beginner will be stressed. This course is open to non-majors only. 2
MUSL 3310 Piano Class II Prerequisite: MUSL 3300. Continuation of MUSL 3300. 2
MUSL 3320 Handbells An introduction to basic ringing techniques, beginning repertory and leadership training, which will include conducting skills and instruction on how to initiate and build a handbell program. Participation in a public ensemble performance required. May be repeated for credit. 1
MUSL 3410 History of Music I Prerequisite: MUSL 2405, 2210. A study of the development of music from 1600 to c.1945, with coverage of representative repertories from the different historical periods. 3
MUSL 3420 History of Music II Prerequisite: MUSL 3410. Continuation of MUSL 3410. 3
MUSL 3500 Woodwind Class Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fundamental techniques in the playing of woodwind instruments, including concepts in pedagogy. 1
MUSL 3530 Early Childhood and Intermediate Music Methods Prerequisites: MUSL 1010, 1220 or permission of the instructor. Methods and materials of music for kindergarten through grade nine 3
MUSL 3560 Choral and Instrumental Methods Prerequisites: MUSL 3530. Methods and materials designed for teaching general, choral and instrumental music in grades six through twelve 3
MUSL 3600 Percussion Class Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fundamental techniques of playing both pitched and unpitched percussion instruments, including pedagogical concepts and instrument maintenance. 1
MUSL 3601 String Class Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fundamental techniques in the playing of stringed instruments, including concepts in pedagogy and program-building. 1
MUSL 3602 Brass Class Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fundamental techniques in the playing of high and low brass instruments, including concepts in pedagogy. 1
MUSL 3800 The Music Industry This course surveys the music industry by highlighting the inter-relationships generated by the demands of where music and business worlds intersect and includes an introduction to the legal and ethical issues impacting the contemporary music professional. 3
MUSL 3850 The Black Composer The role of the black composer in traditional Western art music. 3
MUSL 3860 Acoustics and Introduction to Music Technology An introduction to the physical properties of music production, sound transmission, and audio devices incorporating computers. Characteristics of analog, MIDI and digital recording will be emphasized. Special computer application areas such as using software for sequencing, direct-to-disk recording, and printing music are a few of the specific applications. The North Carolina Technology Competencies for Educators are incorporated into the course. 3
MUSL 3870 Production I This course exposes students to composing for audio recording and multi-media forces, the mechanics of sound architecture, and the creation and alteration of waveforms using methods such as crosswave synthesis, providing students access to the infinite possibilities of sound engineering, permitting and emphasizing the recording of original projects. 3
MUSL 3900 Music of Africa A historical and cultural analysis of the music of Africa and its influence on the music of other world cultures. 3
MUSL 3920 Conducting Principles of conducting and score reading. Practical experience in directing choral and instrumental groups. 2
MUSL 3930 Independent Study II Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. 3
MUSL 4010 Church Music Organization and Literature A study of procedures for organizing a total church music program, with attention paid to denomination traditions, budgeting, the training of choirs, and staffng. Representative sacred choral literature will be studied within this context. 2
MUSL 4020 Organ Literature and Pedagogy A historical survey of solo organ literature and literature for service playing, including the contributions of various ethnic groups to the literature. Pedagogical studies will survey teaching techniques, methods, and recital planning. 3
MUSL 4030 Hymnology A study of the history and development of Christian hymnody, including study of the textual and musical content of hymnals, and their effectiveness in the church service for both choral and congregational use. 2
MUSL 4210 Music and Arts Management Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. The study and practice of the functions related to arts management, with emphasis on music productions, budgeting, personnel management, audience development, promotions management, and various auxiliary areas. 3
MUSL 4220 Counterpoint and Canon Prerequisites: MUSL 2220, 3110. A study of the principles of counterpoint in two and three parts, invertible counterpoint canon and fugue. 3
MUSL 4500 Vocal Techniques A study of tone production, including application of sound vocal principles to choral programs in the public schools. 2
MUSL 4510 Piano Pedagogy Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A study of technical problems, pedagogical procedures, and representative materials encountered in teaching beginning and intermediate piano. 3
MUSL 4530 Vocal Pedagogy Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. An analysis of basic problems encountered in beginning and advanced voice students, and a study of various methods applied to their solutions. Particular emphasis will be placed upon common principles in different approaches. 3
MUSL 4600 Seminar in Contemporary Music Prerequisite: MUSL 3410, 3420 or permission of the instructor. A study of compositions written since 1940 with particular emphasis placed upon recent developments in form, compositional techniques, analysis, and new media of musical expression. 3
MUSL 4610 Instrumental and Choral Arranging Prerequisites: MUSL 2220, 2450, 3500, 3600, 3602, 3630. Problems of harmonic expansion and reduction will be considered as applied to scoring for choral and instrumental ensembles. Part extraction will be emphasized and arrangements will be performed under the direction of the arrangers. 2
MUSL 4720 Composition Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. An introduction to the techniques of musical composition with emphasis on smaller forms. 3
MUSL 4750 Music and Worship Prerequisites: MUSL 3410, 3420. The relationship of music and liturgy to Christian worship and traditions. 3
MUSL 4760 Church Internship Prerequisites: MUSL 4010, 3210 or 4500. A program in which students are responsible as a choir director and/or organist for an assigned church under the supervision of a church and university supervisor. The student will implement skills and concepts learned in the classroom. 2
MUSL 4810 African-American Music: Vocal A study of the stylistic elements as found in the vocal music of West Africa and its influence on the religious music, work songs and blues of the African American. 3
MUSL 4820 African-American Music: Instrumental A study of the stylistic elements as found in the instrumental music of West Africa and their influence of the instrumental music of the African American. 3
MUSL 4850 African Influences on the Music of the Americas African influences on the music of the Western hemisphere, with emphasis on the unique influences, features and distinctive contributions. 3
MUSL 4860 Production II Prerequisite: MUSL 3870. A continuation of Production I, including audio production and mastering with emphasis upon mounting the project for professional consideration. 3
MUSL 4870 Post-Production Prerequisite: MUSL 4860. Instruction combines audio, video, graphics, math, and text into one uniform CD-ROM format which can be marketed and used in illustrating concepts for corporate presentation and teaching in the classroom. Video post-production and film scoring are also discussed. 4
MUSL 4900 Seminar in the Music Industry Examination of the music industry as it relates to the current demands placed on the professional performer, composer, arranger, and merchandiser. Students will be expected to conduct research and present papers. 3
MUSL 4920 Advanced Conducting Prerequisite: MUSL 3920. Practical conducting experience for various styles of music. Emphasis will be placed on conducting choral and instrumental works in larger forms. 2
MUSL 4930 Independent Study III Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3
MUSL 4950 Senior Honors Admission to the Senior Honors in music is by faculty approval only. Honors programs may be undertaken in performance, composition, or history and literature. The projects are a full-length senior recital, an extended composition and its performance, or the presentation of a research paper, respectively. Applied courses are individual lessons on the respective instrument. Applied primary courses are scheduled as one 50-minute lesson per week and receive 1 credit hour. Applied secondary courses are scheduled as one 30-minute lesson per week and receive .5 credit hour. Applied courses are reserved only for music majors but the university student at-large may take an applied secondary lesson only by permission of the instructor. Majors may take applied secondary courses only after taking the required class in that instrument. Applied primary courses require technical studies, repertoire, performance, recital attendance, and jury examination. The semester of enrollment is indicated by the last digit of the course number. Each instrument is offered for 8 semesters in sequential order. 3
MUSL ENSE 9
NURS 2010 Concepts of Professional Practice Prerequisites: Sophomore status, BIO 1610, BIO 1620, SOCI 2000, FOOD 2200, and 2.5 in the Natural Sciences. Co requisite: None. This is a theory and simulated laboratory course which begins to develop the foundation for professional nursing practice. Students learn beginning psychomotor skills necessary for the care of clients. 5
NURS 2020 Health Assessment Prerequisites: Sophomore status, BIO 1610, BIO 1620, SOCI 2000, FOOD 2200, 2.5 in the Natural Sciences, NURS 2010 3
NURS 2030 Medical Terminology This course provides a basic introduction to medical terminology, with a focus on body systems. It provides the student with guided practice and assessment of prefixes, suffixes, word roots, and combining forms. It includes vocabulary, definitions,spelling,and pronunciation. A problem-solving approach to learning is the key strategy and focus of this course. 3
NURS 2201 Pathophysiology Prerequisite: BIO 1610, BIO 1620. Co-requisites: None. Through the epidemiological approach, this course focuses on disease processes related to physiological alterations. The relationship between nursing diagnosis and pathophysiological conditions is emphasized. 2
NURS 3001 Applied Nursing Principles I 0
NURS 3120 Applied Nursing Principles II 0
NURS 3301 Pharmacology in Nursing Prerequisite: Admission to the Upper Division of the nursing major. Co-requisites: NURS 3001, NURS 3460, NURS 3470 and PSY 2100. Focuses on pharmacological therapy and the role of the nurse in the use of pharmacologic agents in the treatment, management and prevention of health problems across the life-span. 3
NURS 3460 Nursing Care of the Adult I Prerequisite: Admission to the Upper Division of the nursing major. Co-requisites: NURS 3001, NURS 3301, and NURS 3470. This is an introduction to the care of adults across the life-span. The focus is on the care of clients with acute and chronic physiological alterations in primary and secondary health care settings. 7
NURS 3461 Nursing Care of the Adult II Prerequisites: NURS 3001, NURS 3301, NURS 3460, and NURS 3470. Co-requisites: NURS 3120, and NURS 3471. Course continues the concepts presented in Adaptation I. Students will apply the nursing process in the care of adult clients with acute physiological alterations. 7
NURS 3462 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing Prerequisites: NURS 3001, NURS 3301, NURS 3460, and NURS 3470. Co-requisite: NURS 3120, NURS 3471. This theory-practicum course explores the application of nursing theories relevant to the nursing care of clients exhibiting maladaptive behavior. The related clinical experiences are directed primarily toward clients requiring in-patient psychiatric care. 5
NURS 3470 Junior Seminar I Prerequisite: Admission to the nursing major. Co requisites: NURS 3001, and NURS 3460. This course introduces professional and personal skills that include communication, critical thinking and inquiry skills. 1
NURS 3471 Junior Seminar II Prerequisites: NURS 3001, NURS 3301, NURS 3460, and NURS 3470. Co-requisites: NURS 3120, NURS 3461, NURS 3462 and PSY 2100. Course focuses on additional professional and personal skills that include problem- solving, teaching, learning, and critical thinking. 1
NURS 4000 Professional Role Development Prerequisites: NURS 4001, NURS 4002, NURS 4102, and NURS 4470. Co-requisites: NURS 4201, and NURS 4471. This is an analysis of sociopolitical and ethical issues and concepts that are directly related to professional nursing practice in an evolving health care system. The role of the nurse as a leader and manager is emphasized. 3
NURS 4001 Applied Nursing Principles III 0
NURS 4002 Nursing Care of the Family Prerequisites: Completion of Junior year nursing courses. Co-requisites: NURS 4001, NURS 4102, and NURS 4470. Course uses the nursing process to focus on normal and altered functions of the woman and family in the childbearing cycle. Developmental concepts are emphasized as the basis of care for the childbearing family with acute, chronic and preventive health care needs. 7
NURS 4102 Adaptation V: Community Health Nursing Prerequisites: Completion of Junior year nursing courses. Co-requisites: NURS 4001, NURS 4002, and NURS 4470. Course explores the nature and scope of community health nursing practice. The focus is on providing care to individuals, families and aggregates using the levels of prevention as a framework. 5
NURS 4140 Independent Study Prerequisite: Senior standing. Co-requisites: None. This is a study of special nursing topics or problems which are of specific interest to the student and approved by the faculty. 6
NURS 4150 Special Topics in Nursing Practice * Prerequisite: Senior standing. Co-requisites: None. This is an examination of selected influential social, ethical, cultural, political and economic forces in the internal and external environments of complex client care system 3
NURS 4201 Adaptation VI: Nursing Care of the Adult with Complex Health Problems Prerequisites: NURS 4001, NURS 4002, NURS 4102, and NURS 4470. Co-requisites: NURS 4471. Course focuses on the nursing care of clients with complex health problems. Learning experiences include an internship that is designed to foster transition to the role of professional nurse at a beginning level. 7
NURS 4230 Transcultural Health Care * Prerequisite: Senior standing. Using the conceptual framework of transcultural health care, the culture of major ethnic and racial groups is explored. Students are encouraged to develop an awareness of each person as a unique system influenced by cultural life-ways. 3
NURS 4310 Critical Care Nursing * Prerequisite: Senior standing. This is a study of alterations in dimensions of human functioning that necessitate admission to a critical care unit. 3
NURS 4330 Health Adaptation and Aging * Prerequisite: Senior standing. This is an overview of applicable theories of aging and related concepts are reviewed. Selected high risk stressors of the aged are addressed and improved adaptation to aging are covered. 3
NURS 4410 Nursing Research Prerequisites: Introductory Statistics, NURS 4001, NURS 4002, NURS 4102, and NURS 4470. Co-requisite: None. Course focuses on the research process. Students learn the steps of the research process and how to critique research findings. 3
NURS 4470 Senior Seminar I Prerequisites: Completion of Junior year nursing courses. Co-requisites: NURS 4001, NURS 4002, and NURS 4102. Emphasis is on role transition and synthesis of knowledge and competencies. Topics such as career pathways and self- appraisal of professional competencies are explored. 1
NURS 4471 Senior Seminar II Prerequisites: NURS 4001, NURS 4002, NURS 4102, and NURS 4470. Co-requisites: NURS 4201. This is a continuation of Senior Seminar I. Emphasis is on role transition and synthesis of knowledge and competencies. Topics such as networking and values clarification are explored. (Nursing Electives ) 1
NURS 4520 Introduction to Professional Nursing for RNs Prerequisites: Unrestricted RN licensure, PSY 2100, and SOCI 2000. Co-requisite: None. Course introduces the registered nurse to professional nursing practice through nursing history, concepts of nursing theory, nursing process, and care planning. 4
NURS 4530 Health Assessment for RNs Prerequisites: Admission to Upper Division of Nursing, Unrestricted RN licensure. Co-requisite: None. Course develops health assessment skills for obtaining health histories and performing physical examinations. Selected abnormal findings will be included to assist the student with detecting deviations from normal functioning and behavior. 3
NURS 4540 Special Health Care Problems for RNs Prerequisites: Admission to Upper Division and Unrestricted RN licensure. Co-requisite: None. Course combines nursing process and nursing theories to enable the student to function as a collaborative member of the health care team. Problem-solving and critical thinking are used as a framework for professional nursing practice. 6
NURS 4550 Nursing Research for RNs Prerequisites: Admission to Upper Division, Unrestricted RN licensure and Introductory Statistics. Co-requisite: None. Course focuses on the research process. Students learn how to apply the steps of the research process and how to critique research findings. 3
NURS 4560 Professional Role Development for RNs Prerequisites: Unrestricted RN licensure, NURS 4530, NURS 4540, and NURS 4550. Co-requisite: None. This is an analysis of sociopolitical and ethical issues and concepts that are directly related to professional nursing practice in an evolving health care system. The role of the nurse as a leader and manager is emphasized. 3
NURS 4570 Senior Seminar for RNs Prerequisites: Unrestricted RN licensure, NURS 4530, NURS 4540, and NURS 4550. Co-requisite: None. Course presents selected topics for continued personal and professional development of the registered nurse. 1
NURS 4580 Community and Mental Health Nursing for RNs Prerequisites: Unrestricted RN licensure, NURS 4530, NURS 4540, NURS 4550. Co-requisite: None. Course explores the nature and scope of community health and mental health nursing using levels of prevention as a framework. 6
PADM 2400 Introduction to Public Administration Prerequisite: POLS 2100. This course involves the study of the principles and problems of public administration at the state and national levels. 3
PADM 3130 Computer Applications to Public Administration Problems I This is an introductory course in computer application to such public administration areas as personnel and financial system maintenance and retrieval, survey and aggregate data analysis, and data transformation systems. 3
PADM 3400 Public financial Administration This course is designed to familiarize the students with the role of financial administration and budgeting in the determination of governmental policy, administrative planning, control of governmental operations, and intergovernmental relations. 3
PADM 3420 Urban Administration This course examines the administrative aspects of urban problems. It examines the causes, effects and possible solutions to these problems making use of such techniques as gaming simulation, field research and interaction with public administrators. The scope of problems considered varies as the urban scene changes. Presently, it includes planning, financing, housing, racism, welfare, poverty, education, crime, transportation and health care. These problems will be examined in light of such concepts as citizen participation, ethnic politics and the politics of decision making. 3
PADM 3460 Public Personnel Administration This course examines the role of human resources in public and nonprofit organizations from a strategic perspective. The student will learn human resource functions, from recruitment and selection to career development. 3
PADM 3470 Public Administration and Public Policy This course will define the public policy-making process in the United States. The major focus will be on defining specific areas of public policy such as housing, welfare, health education, planning, etc., analyzing those policies and proposing alternative delivery systems. The student will be exposed to the processes of public policy formulation, implementation and evaluation. A working knowledge of aggregate data analysis will be helpful to the student. 3
PADM 3490 Intergovernmental Administration This course examines the administrative aspects of policies that cross governmental jurisdiction lines, i.e., local, state and federal. It focuses upon the cooperation, conflicts and competition among the various levels of government and how they affect the administration of public programs. The course will include intergovernmental legislative and personnel problems. 3
PADM 3520 Urban Planning and Public Administration This course focuses on planning theory and practice as they relate to urban areas. It will examine the planning process; it will relate planning to various urban problems, housing, education, health, transportation, etc.; it will relate planning to the administrative process; and will give an overview of the role of planning in national development, i.e. regional planning and other forms of sub-national planning. It will closely examine the relationship between the planner and the administrator in urban areas. 3
PADM 4020 Introduction to Honors Research I Prerequisites: minimum 3.2 GPA and permission of the instructor. Students are introduced to public administration research and must plan and begin the senior thesis. One chapter of the senior thesis must be written and approved in this course. 3
PADM 4030 Introduction to Honors Research II Prerequisite: PADM 4020. In this course students complete the senior thesis begun in PADM 4020. 3
PADM 4130 Computer Applications to Public Administration Problems II Prerequisite: PADM 3130. This is an advanced course in computer application, which deals with the study of advanced computer techniques including multivariate analysis, index and scale applications to public administration systems, and research using several computer routines. 3
PADM 4230 Administration and Organizational Theory Prerequisite: PADM 2400. This is an advanced course in public administration designed to strengthen the student’s understanding of the theory and practice of administrative organizations. 3
PADM 4240 Seminar in Public Administration Prerequisites: PADM 3400, 3460, 3470, 3490, 4230, and senior status. This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to synthesize the various aspects of the public administration program. Students will be expected to draw on all of their experiences, lecture courses, internship and directed readings, and to address the issues and problems in the field of public administration. 3
PADM 4300 Public Administration Internship I Prerequisites: PADM 2400, 3130, 3400, 3460, 3470, and senior status. This internship is a highly structured course designed to help the student integrate theoretical, textbook knowledge with the real world of public administration. The nature of this internship is experiential, and the student is under close supervision by the internship director and trained agency personnel, while working on clearly defined projects. 3
PADM 4310 Public Administration Internship II Prerequisite: PADM 4300. This course is a continuation of PADM 4300, in which the student will complete additional hours in a public or nonprofit agency. A final paper describing the internship experience is required. 3
PADM 4620 Special Topics in Public Administration This course involves an investigation of in-depth, research-based analyses of contemporary topical areas in public administration not covered in other courses. It is designed to address the emerging issues related to the discipline. 3
PADM 4630 Independent Study Prerequisite: Junior or senior status. This course includes independent readings and research under the supervision of an instructor. The course may be repeated twice as different topics or readings are selected for examination. 3
PEDU 1010 Archery A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1020 Bowling A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1030 Jogging A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1040 Karate A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1050 Elementary Golf A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1060 Basketball A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1070 Softball A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1080 Rhythmic Aerobics/Aerobic Training A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1090 Stunts, Tumbling and Trampoline A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1100 Elementary Swimming A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1110 Tennis A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1120 Volleyball/Badminton A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1130 Weight Training A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1140 Adapted Activities (Individuals w/disabilities) A study of the basic principles of lifetime fitness and the fundamentals of lifetime sports. 2
PEDU 1195 Self Defense Karate 2
PEDU 1541 Fitness An introductory course in fitness that offers the latest fitness knowledge based on up-to-date findings in exercise physiology and fitness along with the tools for self assessment and guidelines for developing a personalized tness program. CPR certification is a requirement of the course. 2
PEDU 2000 Introduction to Physical Education This course is designed as an introduction to the field of Physical education and related areas of sport and recreation. The historical development, foundations and trends, scope, careers, relative to physical education, sport, and recreation are addressed. This is a writing intensive course. 2
PEDU 2010 Musculoskeletal Anatomy A course that provides students with practical applications and functional anatomical strategies of theory associated with human movement/sport rehabilitation. 3
PEDU 2020 Advanced Bowling Prerequisites: PEDU 1020, 125 average. An advanced study of bowling technique and an introduction to the concepts of team bowling, handicap bowling, and league bowling 2
PEDU 2050 Advanced Golf Prerequisites: PEDU 1050, handicap of 12 or less. An advanced study of the skill of golf and consideration of concepts related to tournament play. 2
PEDU 2060 Advanced Motor Skills An examination of soccer and speed ball techniques with emphasis upon methods of teaching skills and strategies. 2
PEDU 2070 Advanced Weight Training Prerequisite: PEDU 1130. An advanced study of the principles of weight training regimen including diet, proper supplementation, and flexibility. Designed to give an overview of the principles of training and the proper position techniques. 2
PEDU 2080 Advanced Rhythmic Aerobics/Aerobic Training Prerequisite: PEDU 1080. A study of health-related concepts and aerobic fitness activities, with emphasis on cardiovascular endurance. Leadership and instructional skills required for certification in aerobic dance will also be considered. 2
PEDU 2095 Methods of Stunts and Tumbling Prerequisite: PEDU major. A course designed for physical education majors to teach the basic skills of stunts and tumbling to K-12 students. 1
PEDU 2100 Intermediate Swimming Prerequisite: PEDU 1100 or equivalent skill. A study of swimming techniques at Levels 5-7 of the American Red Cross Learn-to-Swim program. 1
PEDU 2200 Practicum in Exercise Science Prerequisites: PEDU 2000, 2070, 2080. An early field experience in exercise leadership, fitness assessment, and nutritional analysis. 2
PEDU 2250 Introduction to Athletic Training Prerequisite: BIOL 1610 or enrolled in BIOL 1610. An introduction to Athletic Training that includes instruction in basic injury evaluation, emergency and rehabilitative care, wrapping and taping techniques, determination of environmental risk factors, and other topics related to athletic training. A one-hour lab is required. 4
PEDU 2300 Practicum I in Athletic Training Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Education Program, PEDU 2250. A one-semester clinical experience with a weekly lecture/lab format that reviews the clinical and didactic competencies learned throughout the ATEP with an emphasis on course work from the previous semester, pre-participation examinations and emergency care techniques in athletic training. 2
PEDU 3000 Motor Learning Prerequisites: PEDU 2000 and RECR 1000. An analysis of skill acquisition. Primary consideration given to the cognitive and motor processes underlying the learning of motor skills, and factors that influence motor skill learning 3
PEDU 3050 Motor Development 3
PEDU 3100 Individual Motor Skills in Games An examination of tennis, archery, badminton, handball, paddle tennis and table tennis with emphasis upon techniques of teaching. 2
PEDU 3201 Orthopedic & Physical Assessment I Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. This course provides an advanced study of orthopedic and physical assessment pertaining to injuries and conditions of the lower extremity along with general medical conditions. 3
PEDU 3202 Orthopedic & Physical Assessment II Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program and PEDU 3201. This course provides an advanced study of orthopedic and physical assessment pertaining to injuries and conditions of the upper extremity along with general medical conditions. 3
PEDU 3220 Administrative Aspects in Athletic Training Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. An introductory course in athletic training administrative practices. Topics and activities include facility design, budget planning, program management, policies, procedures, information systems and risk management. 3
PEDU 3230 Therapeutic Modalities Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, PEDU 2250. An introduction to the principles and procedures involved in administration of therapeutic modalities, including heat, cold, ultrasound, electricity, mechanical and manual therapies. 4
PEDU 3240 Therapeutic Exercise Prerequisite: Admission to the Athletic Training Program. An introductory course designed to address the principles and procedures of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation as they relate to the profession of athletic training. 4
PEDU 3300 Gymnastics An introduction to the nature and scope of the basic skills in gymnastics. 2
PEDU 3301 Practicum II in Athletic Training Prerequisites: PEDU 2300, PEDU 2250. A one-semester athletic training clinical experience and a one-hour weekly lecture. Specific psychomotor competencies to be evaluated include injury evaluations of the lower extremity, and various general medical procedures. 1
PEDU 3302 Practicum III in Athletic Training Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program and PEDU 3301, PEDU 3230. A one-semester clinical experience with a weekly lecture/lab format that reviews the clinical and didactic competencies learned throughout the ATEP with an emphasis on coursework from the previous semester. 1
PEDU 3320 Advanced Gymnastics Prerequisite: PEDU 3300. An advanced study of techniques in gymnastics. 2
PEDU 3420 Kinesiology 3
PEDU 3500 Emergency Care and Safety Techniques An introduction to the American Red Cross approved skills necessary to respond in an emergency situation requiring first aid and/or CPR. 1
PEDU 3620 Lifeguarding Prerequisite: PEDU 2100 or permission of instructor. An introduction to lifeguarding techniques and water safety skills with emphasis on acquiring lifeguarding and water safety techniques required for the American Red Cross Lifeguarding Certification. 3
PEDU 3630 Water Safety Instruction Prerequisite: PEDU 2100 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the techniques of teaching aquatic skills. Certification by the American Red Cross as a Water Safety Instructor is available upon completion of the course. 3
PEDU 3640 Administration and Management of Aquatic Programs and Facilities A study of the operation and maintenance of aquatic facilities for schools, municipalities, and other organizations, with additional consideration to the organization and administration of aquatic programs. 3
PEDU 3650 Methods in Adapted Aquatics An examination of instructional techniques used to teach swimming to individuals with disabilities. 3
PEDU 3710 Officiating and Judging Individual and Dual Sports Prerequisite: PEDU 3100. An overview of techniques in officiating aquatics, tennis, gymnastics, wrestling, and golf. 1
PEDU 3730 Officiating and Judging Team Sports Prerequisite: PEDU 2060. An overview of techniques in officiating football, basketball, track and field, soccer, and volleyball. 1
PEDU 3750 Team Sports I Prerequisites: PEDU 2000, 3100, or permission of instructor. An advanced study of skills and techniques of teaching football, basketball, and soccer. Instructional unit planning for each sport will be required. 1
PEDU 3760 Team Sports II Prerequisites: PEDU 2000, 3100, or permission of instructor. An advanced study of skills and techniques of teaching track and field, volleyball, and baseball/softball. Instructional unit planning for each sport will be required. 1
PEDU 4020 Physical Education Program Organization/ Administration An investigation of practices and problems of organization and administration of instructional and extra-curricular programs in physical education, with attention to curriculum design and development for grades one through twelve. 3
PEDU 4030 Psycho-Socio Aspects of Physical Activity and Leisure Prerequisites: PEDU 2000, RECR 1000 or consent of instructor. A study of psychological and sociological factors that affect participation and behavior in physical activity and leisure. 3
PEDU 4050 fitness Management A study of the various theories, concepts, principles, and practices of management which may be applied in organizations whose primary objective is to provide athletic-related and/or fitness related activities, products, or services. 3
PEDU 4110 Kinesiology Prerequisites: BIOL 1610 and BIOL 1620, or depending upon program. An investigative analysis of human motion and application of anatomical, physiological, and mechanical principles to prescription for improving performance of motor skills. 3
PEDU 4120 Physiology of Exercise Prerequisites: BIOL 1610 and BIOL 1620, or depending upon program. An examination of the basic metabolic processes as they occur at rest and during exercise, with emphasis on the dynamics of muscular contraction and circulation, the relationship of nutrition to physical performance, and the effects of hot, cold, altitude, and water environments upon performance. 3
PEDU 4130 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription Prerequisites: PEDU 4110, PEDU 4120, BIOL 1610 and BIOL 1620. A study of methods and procedures in physiological assessment of human fitness, exercise prescription and exercise leadership. Topics related to exercise for the aging will also be discussed. 3
PEDU 4150 Leisure and Fitness An introduction to leisure and fitness, including lecture and laboratory experiences. Designed for students to advance their knowledge in contemporary, noncompetitive activities and in a series of fitness activities. Each student will be required to pass specific fitness levels and to demonstrate skill in selected noncompetitive leisure/outdoor activities. 1
PEDU 4201 Advanced Athletic Training Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, BIOL 1610 & 1620, and PEDU 2250. An advanced study of athletic injuries as they relate to cause, prevention, and rehabilitative care, with emphasis on evaluation guidelines. Designed to meet National Athletic Training Certification requirements. An individual project is required. 3
PEDU 4220 Seminars in Sports Medicine Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, PEDU 4201, 3220, 3230, 3240. This course is designed to address a variety of current issues and technical advances in sports medicine. Guest speakers from various backgrounds and experiences will provide the bulk of the lecture presentation. 3
PEDU 4303 Field Experience I Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, PEDU 3302, PEDU 3240. A one-semester clinical experience with a weekly lecture/lab format that reviews the clinical and didactic competencies learned during the previous semester. 1
PEDU 4304 Field Experience II Prerequisites: Admission to the Athletic Training Program, PEDU 4303. A capstone course with a weekly lecture/lab format that reviews clinical and didactic competencies learned throughout the Athletic Training Program. 2
PEDU 4400 Methods and Materials for Teaching Elementary Physical Education An interdisciplinary course examining methods/materials of teaching elementary school physical education, health, and safety, focusing on movement education concepts and game approach observation, analysis, and journal writing during early clinical experience. 2
PEDU 4410 Evaluation and Measurement Prerequisites: PEDU 2000, RECR 1000, and REC 3100. An introduction to cognitive, affective, and motor measurement; evaluation principles and practices, with emphasis on general motor ability, physical fitness, sports skills, and elementary statistics. 3
PEDU 4450 Motor Development Prerequisites: PEDU 2000 or consent of instructor. The study of the changes in motor behavior over the lifespan, the processes that underlie these changes and the factors that affect them. 3
PEDU 4500 Adapted Physical Education Prerequisites: BIOL 1610, 1620; and PEDU 3000. A study of comprehensive and up-to-date information regarding physical activities for individuals with disabilities, with emphasis on current legislation and IEP development and assessment, physical education for infants and toddlers, and programming. A laboratory experience is required for this course. 3
PEDU 4510 American Sign Language for Beginners An introductory course in American Sign Language and other manual communication skills. 3
PEDU 4600 Methods and Material in Secondary Physical Education Prerequisites: PEDU 3750, 3760, 4020, or permission of instructor. Lecture/laboratory experiences designed for teacher licensure majors to demonstrate both knowledge and skill in their teaching and learning theory. The study of various methods will include planning, management, feedback and analysis, and assessment and evaluation of the teaching-learning process. 3
PEDU 4640 Internship in Exercise Science Prerequisite: Completion of all course work in physical education. An entry level practical experience of contractual agreement between the University supervisor, site supervisor, and the student internist. Provides for 480 hours or a minimum of 12 weeks of a practicum in a clinical setting of an allied prevention health care facility. 12
PEDU 4710 Coaching Theory Prerequisites: PEDU 2060 and 3100. An examination of the critical concerns influencing athletic organizations, their administration and theoretical parameters which impact the behavior and performance of coaches, with emphasis on applying educationally sound techniques of coaching in laboratory experiences. 1
PEDU 4800 Independent Study in Physical Education and Recreation Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent reading and research for upper level undergraduate student physical education and recreation majors under faculty supervision. This is an opportunity for advanced study in a special area in physical education and/or recreation. 3
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy An investigation of the methods and goals of philosophy as a distinctive mode of inquiry. 3
PHIL 2000 Critical Thinking An introduction to basic rules and principles of critical thinking through an examination of the nature and structure of different kinds of argument. The goal of the course is to enhance the student’s ability to think clearly and rationally. 3
PHIL 2010 Images of Man A critical examination of the major theories of human nature including Confucianism, Hinduism, the Bible, Plato, Marx, Freud, and Skinner. 3
PHIL 2110 History of Philosophy I: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy An historical survey of philosophy from classical antiquity through the Medieval period with special attention given to the philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, and Aquinas. 3
PHIL 2120 History of Philosophy II: Modern Philosophy An historical investigation of major philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with special emphasis on Descartes, Spinoza, Liebniz, Locke, and Berkeley. 3
PHIL 2210 Ethics A critical examination of ethical theories and contemporary issues related to social and economic justice. 3
PHIL 2300 Logic A study of deductive arguments, problems with ordinary language, logical fallacies, modern symbolic logic, and inductive logic and scientific method. 3
PHIL 2400 Business Ethics An examination of ethical questions and issues related to business decisions, practices and policies. 3
PHIL 2500 Religions and the World A comparison of the major religions of the world, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. The course examines the views of each religion concerning the concept of deity, human nature, the meaning and purpose of life, and conditions of salvation/enlightenment. 3
PHIL 3120 Philosophy of Science An investigation of the nature of science, scientific laws and theories, and scientific explanation in both the natural and social sciences. 3
PHIL 3210 Social and Political Philosophy An analysis of central concepts in the logic of political obligation, justice, and law. The course explores the place of legal judgment in the context of value judgment in general. 3
PHIL 3220 Philosophy of Religion An examination of the divine attributes, religious experience, faith, religious diversity, immortality, and conflicts between religion and science. 3
PHIL 3320 Philosophy of Existence A study of philosophical literature dealing with basic aspects and dimensions of human existence. The primary purpose of the course is to provide a philosophical investigation of the “human condition.” 3
PHIL 4210 Philosophy of Art An analysis of fundamental concepts of art such as beauty, form, aesthetic pleasure, together with an examination of some of the major philosophies of art. 3
PHIL 4220 Philosophy and Reality A study of philosophical theories dealing with the nature of ultimate reality. 3
PHIL 4500 Independent Study Permission of the Instructor is required. An intensive, comprehensive investigation of a particular philosopher, school of philosophy, or philosophical issue. 3
PHRM 1000 Human Anatomy Physiology This course is an integrated, in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, including cells, tissues, integument, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and sense organs. There is also emphasis on cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, excretory, and reproductive systems and human development. Prerequisite BIOL 1101 General Biology I 3
PHRM 4100 Immunology Virology This course is an introduction to Immunology and Virology. Topics will include the basic concepts of immunity, including molecular and cellular composition of the immune system and immune processes that are responsible for defense against pathogens and tumors, as well as allergic and autoimmune reactions. Structure and function of viruses, viral diseases, vaccines, cancer, immunological techniques used in industry, use of viruses in the biotechnology industry will all be included within this course. The course will also include theoretical discussion of therapeutic and diagnostic uses of antibodies, sterile technique, hybridoma production, selection and cell cloning. Prerequisite BIOL 3330 Molecular Cell Biology, or with the consent of the instructor 3
PHRM 4110 Bioprocess Cell Culture This course teaches the skills needed to work as a scientist in biotechnology production. Students will grow and monitor bacterial and mammalian cells on a laboratory scale that emulates the large scale production used in industry. Students will become familiar with the cleaning, sterilization, aseptic inoculation, operation and monitoring of fermenters and bioreactors. Students then recover and purify proteins produced by those cell cultures. They recover and purify proteins using centrifugation, ultrafiltration and chromatography techniques. The course emphasizes the use of current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP), and students gain experience following Standard Operating Procedures (SOP).Prerequisite BIOL 3330 Molecular Cell Biology, or with the consent of the instructor 3
PHRM 4111 Bioprocess Cell Culture Lab This course teaches the skills needed to work as a scientist in biotechnology production. Students will grow and monitor bacterial and mammalian cells on a laboratory scale that emulates the large scale production used in industry. Students will become familiar with the cleaning, sterilization, aseptic inoculation, operation and monitoring of fermenters and bioreactors. Students then recover and purify proteins produced by those cell cultures. They recover and purify proteins using centrifugation, ultrafiltration and chromatography techniques. The course emphasizes the use of current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP), and students gain experience following Standard Operating Procedures (SOP).Prerequisite BIOL 3330 Molecular Cell Biology, or with the consent of the instructor 2
PHRM 4120 Assay Design This course teaches the skills needed for employment in a research and development entity in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. There will be an overview of the drug discovery process followed by detailed review of assay methods applicable to early phase small molecule discovery and upstream biologics development. Students will become familiar with different assays employed in the industries as screening tools and learn how to choose relevant assays to determine desired endpoints. Detailed review of protocols to enable, develop, and validate robust assays for target screening, potency and efficacy determinations, selectivity and specificity will be presented.Prerequisite CHEM 45004520 Biochemistry Lab, or with the consent of the instructor 4
PHRM 4130 Bioanalytical Chemistry Interdisciplinary knowledge is becoming more and more important to the modern scientist. Bioanalytical chemistry is an interdisciplinary field in which analytical methods and instruments are used to solve problems of interest in biology or biochemistry. The goal of this course is to educate students in analytical methodologies used to separate and characterize compounds resulting from biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. This course will provide students the opportunity to learn mass spectrometry of small molecules and biomolecules, LCMS, separation techniques (Gel filtration chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), spectroscopic techniques UVvis adsorption, luminescence and fluorescence and Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) and biosensor technology.Prerequisites CHEM 2020 Quantitative Analysis, CHEM 45004520 Biochemistry and lab, or with the consent of the instructor 3
PHRM 4131 Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab Interdisciplinary knowledge is becoming more and more important to the modern scientist. Bioanalytical chemistry is an interdisciplinary field in which analytical methods and instruments are used to solve problems of interest in biology or biochemistry. The goal of this course is to educate students in analytical methodologies used to separate and characterize compounds resulting from biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. This course will provide students the opportunity to learn mass spectrometry of small molecules and biomolecules, LCMS, separation techniques (Gel filtration chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), spectroscopic techniques UVvis adsorption, luminescence and fluorescence and Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) and biosensor technology.Prerequisites CHEM 2020 Quantitative Analysis, CHEM 45004520 Biochemistry and lab, or with the consent of the instructor 1
PHRM 5120 Advanced Biochemistry Lab This course will expand on the basic concepts covered in CHEM4520. Students will deepen their knowledge of and handson experience with cloning, bacterial expression, enzyme purification and assay development. Students will perform a semesterlong project that involves amplification of a gene using PCR, cloning the PCR product, expressing the protein in E. coli, purifying the protein, and developing and optimizing an assay to measure enzyme activity. The purification will employ the AKTA System, a stateoftheart purification system from GE Healthcare that is specifically designed for protein purification. Handson practical experience will be gained in molecular biology, general biochemical techniques, and fundamental enzymology. Time 3 lab hours twice a week. Prerequisite CHEM 31203320 Organic Chemistry and lab, CHEM45004520 Biochemistry and Lab, or with the consent of the instructor 2
PHYS 1000 Physics with Application to Environmental Topics A course designed to present the basic concepts of physics in their application to the study of the environment. 3
PHYS 1210 The Language of Science A study of the process by which scientists acquire, analyze and organize information. The student is challenged to observe carefully, to experiment, to analyze critically and to synthesize results into an analytical 3
PHYS 1310 General Physics for Science and Pre-Engineering Majors I Corequisite: MATH 2010 or permission of instructor. A study of the fundamental concepts in physics and their use in analyzing physical systems. Topics covered: one-dimensional kinematics, vectors and kinematics in two- and three-dimensions, Newton’s laws and particle dynamics, rotational kinematics and dynamics, temperature, thermal properties of matter, the first law of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases 3
PHYS 1410 Introduction to Nanoscience and Nanotechnology A course that gives students a relatively broad background in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. The course does not have a traditional lecture-practice class format, but rather has the form of seminars with inclusion of visual presentations and specifically designed labs. The course will give the students an overview of the nanosicence, which is each day more and more important in all science disciplines and technology. It consists of the two parts: Nanoscience Background and Nanoscience Applications and Instrumentation. 3
PHYS 2050 Astronomy An introduction to the field of astronomy. This course will acquaint the student with the methods and tools of modem astronomy. The historical development of astronomical models is briefly reviewed. The student will study the population of stars in the universe, their evolution and the processes responsible for it. They will study in some detail our galaxy, the solar system and the planets. Current cosmological theories will be reviewed. 3
PHYS 2110 General Physics I Prerequisites: MATH 1100 and 1200 with a grade of “C” or better. An introduction to the principles of physics for students majoring in the life sciences. Topics covered include: kinematics in one- and two-dimensions, vectors, particle dynamics, energy, rotational and oscillatory motion, fluids, sound and waves. 4
PHYS 2120 General Physics II Prerequisite: PHYS 2110. A continuation of PHYS 2110. Topics covered include: electricity and magnetism, heat and thermodynamics. 4
PHYS 2300 General Physics for Scientists and Engineers 3
PHYS 2310 General Physics for Science and Pre-Engineering Majors II Prerequisite: PHYS 1310. Corequisite: Math 2020. A continuation of Physics 1310. Topics covered: electric fields, Gauss’s law, electric potential, capacitors, dielectrics, electric circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law, inductance, magnetic materials, propagation of light, geometrical optics and applications. 3
PHYS 2320 General Physics for Science and Pre-Engineering Majors III Prerequisite PHYS 1310. A continuation of Physics 2310. Topics covered include Equilibrium and elasticity, gravitation, periodic motion, uid mechanics, mechanical waves, interference and normal modes, sound waves, electromagnetic waves, interference, diffraction, polarization of waves, alternating currents, the second law of thermodynamics. 4
PHYS 2410 Laboratory I Corequisite: PHYS 2310. Laboratory for students majoring in science or engineering. Students will develop laboratory skills, and they will be introduced to statistical methods for the analysis of data. Experiments will deal with the description and analysis of motion in one and two- dimensions, dynamical systems and waves. 1
PHYS 2420 Laboratory II Corequisite: PHYS 2320. A continuation of PHYS 2410. Experiments will include simple electrical circuits, electromagnetic waves, properties of fluids, and thermal properties of materials. 1
PHYS 2500 Introduction to Biophysics A basic overview of the key concepts of biophysics, especially molecular biophysics, by applying physical principles, methods, and techniques to the study of bio physical phenomena. . Lectures stress the elementary behavior of ions, proteins, and nucleic acids in the biological membranes, biopolymers, muscular movement, and nervous systems. The course objectives will be accomplished through lectures and discussion of selected topics in class, through laboratory studies, group exercises, and by assigned parts of text. 3
PHYS 3060 Electricity and Magnetism Prerequisites: PHYS 2320; MATH 2030. A presentation of the classical theory of electricity and magnetism. Topics include: electrostatics, magnetostatics, fields of moving charges, Maxwell’s equations. 3
PHYS 3070 Electricity and Magnetism II A brief review of PHYS 3060 3
PHYS 3100 Principles of Electronics Prerequisites: PHYS 2320 and 2420 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to the fundamental principles of electronic circuits and devices. Topics covered include: circuit laws and the analysis of elementary circuits, measurement instruments and techniques, phaser analysis of RLC 3
PHYS 3110 Mechanics I Prerequisites: PHYS 2320 and MATH 2030. A presentation of the classical theory of mechanics. Topics include: particle dynamics, central forces, dynamics of a system, oscillations, motion of rigid bodies, and LaGrange Equations. 3
PHYS 3120 Mechanics II Continuation of PHYS 3110 3
PHYS 3200 Data Acquisition, Control and Analysis An introduction to the computerization of data acquisition, instrumentation control, and the manipulation and analysis of signals. 3
PHYS 3210 Laboratory III Prerequisite: PHYS 2320 and 2410. A study of the experimental basis for modern physics. Fundamental constants of atomic physics will be measured. 2
PHYS 3220 Laboratory IV Prerequisite: PHYS 2310 and 2420. A continuation of PHYS 3210 2
PHYS 3290 Environmental Physics A study of physical models of environmental systems and the instrumentation utilized to measure the environmental parameters used in such models. 3
PHYS 3310 Modem Physics Prerequisite: PHYS 2320 or permission of the instructor. A study of special relativity and an introduction to quantum theory and its application to simple systems. Elements of atomic, solid state and nuclear physics will be included. 3
PHYS 3410 Computational Physics I Prerequisite Phys 2320 or permission of the instructor. A study of computational modeling and simulation of classical systems including projectile motion, orbital motion, oscillators, and linear and non-linear systems. Students will investigate algorithms, programming, debugging, and analysis of results and data. 3
PHYS 3510 Nanotechnology A course designed to introduce students to the fundamental changes in photonic, electronic and magnetic properties which occur when particle sizes approach atomic and molecular dimensions. It focuses on development of new materials at the atomic and molecular level and to employment of them to achieve novel properties for next generation devices. A goal is to provide students with a design tool based on nanotechnology that will allow them to engineer next generation materials and devices. The course is designed to give students an appreciation of the different properties offered by nanostructured materials, particularly when it comes to their interactions with light, electric and magnetic fields. 3
PHYS 4110 Thermal Physics Prerequisites: PHYS 3110 and 3310. A study of the principles of statistical mechanics. Topics include: approach to equilibrium, thermodynamics, property of ideal gases, kinetic theory, equilibrium between phases and chemical species as well as quantum statistics and some applications. 3
PHYS 4220 Mathematical Methods of Physics Prerequisites: PHYS 3110; MATH 4410. A study of the mathematical methods used in the development of physical theories and models. Topics include: continuum theory and field theory, linear vector spaces, function spaces, partial differential equations, boundary value problems, elements of groups and their representations and their applications in physics. 3
PHYS 4230 Lasers and Applied Optics Prerequisite PHYS 3060 or permission of the instructor. A study of classical and modern optical phenomena including geometrical, Fresnel and Fourier optics, lasers, fiber optics and optoelectronic devices. 3
PHYS 4250 Science Instrumentation An interdepartmental course which provides junior and higher level students majoring in biology, chemistry and physics with a general knowledge of the theory and application of instrumental methods widely used in science. The course gives practical experience in the operation of instruments and interpretation of the data gathered from these instruments, and shows how these instrumental methods can be used to make measurements and solve problems common to all three of scientific areas. 5
PHYS 4300 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics Prerequisites: PHYS 3310, 3060, and 3410. A study of the principles of quantum mechanics, the Schrodinger equations and its applications to 1-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom, perturbation methods and scattering. 3
PHYS 4310 Quantum Mechanics II A study of the time-independent perturbation theory and its application to the description of the fine structure of Hydrogen, the Zeeman effect, and Hyperfine splitting. Students will use time-dependent perturbation theory to study two level system and the absorption and emission of radiation. Topics include the one and two electron atoms, hydrogen molecule and molecular bond, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, the deuteron problem in nuclear physics, the nature of the nuclear force, and alpha decay. Students will be introduced to partial wave analysis and the Born approximation, the adiabatic approximation, and the variational principle. 3
PHYS 4320 Nuclear and Particle Physics Corequisite: PHYS 4300. A study of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, the nuclear force, models of the nucleus, elementary particles, their production and decays, and their symmetries. 3
PHYS 4330 Solid State Physics Corequisite: PHYS 4300. A study of symmetries and crystalline structure of solids, electrical and magnetic properties of solids, semi-conductors, low temperature phenomena and excitations in solids. 3
PHYS 4400 Microelectronics Laboratory Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A study on the implementation of binary operations by means of electronic circuits. Operations of logic gates, design of logical networks, microprocessor architecture, memory devices and interfacing techniques will be covered. Students will use common integrated circuit devices for selected applications. 3
PHYS 4410 Computational Physics II Prerequisites: Physics 3410, 3060, and 3310. A continuation of Physics 3410 that focuses on modeling and simulating continuously distributed systems. The course includes a study of special functions and Gaussian quadrature, boundary values and Eigen values problems, explicit and implicit methods, relaxation and spectral methods for the solution of partial differential equations, stability of solutions, and Monte Carlo Methods. 3
PHYS 4520 Applied Spectroscopy Prerequisites: PHYS 3310, 3060. A study of the principles of atomic and molecular spectra and the design and operation of spectrometers for the study of these spectra. Attention will be given to applications of spectroscopic techniques in areas such as materials processing, communication, and environmental studies. 3
PHYS 4900 Senior Thesis Prerequisite: Senior classiflcation. Each physics major is expected to complete a project in her/his area of concentration. The student must select a topic and the supervisor of the project from a departmentally approved list by the end of the junior year. The student must produce a written and an oral report. 12
PHYS 5060 Electromagnetic Theory Pre-requisite: PHYS 4070. This course, the first of a two semester sequence, is a graduate level course covering the theory and application of Maxwell's equations. Topics to be covered in this course include: electric potentials and electric fields arising from static charge distributions, effects of conducting surfaces on electric fields; electrostatics of polarizable media, magnetic fields from steady currents, magnetic fields in permeable media, energy and momentum of electromagnetic fields and gauge transformations of electromagnetic fields. Mastery of these topics will result in a clear understanding of the nature and calculation of electromagnetic fields in realistic physical systems. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5070 Electromagnetic Theory II Pre-requisite: PHYS 5060. This course, the second of a two semester sequence intended for graduate students, covers the theory of time dependent electromagnetic fields. Topics covered include: propagation of plane electromagnetic waves in dielectric media, waveguides and resonant cavities, fields emitted from simple radiating systems, scattering and diffraction of electromagnetic waves, application of special relativity to the theory of electromagnetic fields, dynamics of relativistic particles and fields, collisions between moving charged particles, radiation from moving charges. Understanding of these topics is of critical importance to the study of high energy, nuclear and solid state physics. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5110 Advanced Classical Mechanics Pre-requisite: PHYS 3110. This course is an advanced theoretical mechanics taken by graduate students which treats formalisms used in classical mechanics, including Newtonian, Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian methods, and classic problems in mechanics. Formal topics covered include variational principles, generalized coordinates, symmetry and conservation laws, integrability, stability, canonical transformations, Poisson Brackets, Hamilton-Jacobi Theory, and chaos in Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5210 Statistical Mechanics Pre-requisite: PHYS 4110, Co-requisite: PHYS 5300. This course is a graduate level course that develops the methods of statistical mechanics and uses them to calculate observable properties of systems in thermodynamic equilibrium. Topics covered are the principles of classical thermodynamics, canonical and grand conical ensembles for classical and quantum mechanical systems, partition functions and statistical thermodynamics, ideal gases of quanta, atoms and polyatomic molecules, degeneracy of Fermi and Bose gases, chemical equilibrium, ideal paramagnetics and an introduction to simple interacting systems. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5260 Advanced Mathematical Methods in Physics Pre-requisite: PHYS 5110 and MATH 4410. This graduate level course on mathematical methods focuses on the formulation and solution of equations necessary to describe physical systems. Application of these methods to specific areas of physics will be emphasized. Topics covered in this course include vector analysis and calculus, tensor analysis, linear and matrix algebra, group theory, infinite series, functions of complex variables, (including contour integration and the residue theorem) differential equations and boundary value problems. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5300 Advanced Quantum Mechanics I Pre-requisite: PHYS 4310. A study of the principles of quantum physics with an emphasis on selected applications to atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei and elementary particles. This is the first course of a twosemester sequence. Topics include the development of the Schrödinger wave equation description in quantum mechanics and applications to 1-dimensional and 3-dimensional time independent systems including the harmonic oscillator and alpha-decay, the hydrogen atom with spin and angular momentum operators along with multiparticle wavefunctions and symmetries and multielectron atoms with the addition of angular momentum. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5310 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II Pre-requisite: PHYS 5300. A study of the principles of quantum physics with an emphasis on selected applications to atoms, molecules, solids, nuclei and elementary particles. This is the second course of a twosemester sequence. Topics include the addition of angular momenta, tensor operators and the Wigner-Eckart Theorem, the path integral formulation of quantum theory, approximation methods including the variational and WKB methods, time independent and time dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory and an introduction to relativistic quantum mechanics and the Dirac Equation. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5330 Advanced Solid State Physics Pre-requisite: PHYS 5310. This graduate level course on solid state physics focuses on the physical properties of crystalline solids. Electronic, vibrational and thermal properties of semiconductors and metals of simplified and realistic physical systems, including semiconductors and metals, will be determined by analysis of their crystal structures. (Three lecture hours per week.) 3
PHYS 5360 Nuclear Physics I Pre-requisite: PHYS 5310 or permission from the instructor. This graduate level course in nuclear physics focuses on nuclear models, nuclear reactions and methods of experimental nuclear physics. Topics include internucleon forces, compound-nucleus processes, shell model, optical model, R-matrix theory, nuclear reactions, collective model, electromagnetic transitions, isobaric analog states and nuclear structure. An introduction to experimental nuclear physics covering properties of nuclear radiation, detectors and accelerators will also be presented. 3
PHYS 5370 Nuclear Physics II Pre-requisite: PHYS 5360. This graduate level course on nuclear physics, the continuation of PHYS 5360, provides an advanced description of nuclear reactions and interaction between subatomic particles. Topics covered include nuclear astrophysics, particles, fundamental symmetries and conservation laws. The current understanding of weak interactions, neutrino physics, lepton-nucleon scattering, form factors, structure functions, QCD, gluon field, color, W and Z fields, electro-weak unification, the CKM matrix and relativistic heavy ion collisions will also be described. 3
PHYS 5410 Advanced Computational Physics I Pre-requisite: PHYS 3020. This graduate level course in computational physics, the first in a two-course sequence, focuses on numerical methods used to solve problems encountered in many areas of physics. Topics covered include: modeling the motion of simple physical systems, solving linear and nonlinear sets of equations, fitting of experimental data, and numerical integration of partial differential equations. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5420 Advanced Computational Physics II Pre-requisite: PHYS 5410. This graduate level course in computational physics, the second in a two-course sequence, focuses on numerical methods used to solve problems encountered in solid state physics, quantum mechanics and nuclear physics. Topics covered include: simulations of simple solid state physical systems, solving the Schrödinger equation with boundary conditions, and solutions of fundamental problems in nuclear physics. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5460 Particle Physics I Pre-requisite: PHYS 5310 or permission from the instructor. This course is an introduction to theoretical and experimental particle physics, specifically fundamental symmetries and the dynamics of quarks and leptons. In this course, the first in a two semester sequence, the Standard Model, Dirac equation, electrodynamics of spin-0 and spin ½ particles are studied. 3
PHYS 5470 Particle Physics II Pre-requisite: PHYS 5460. This course is an introduction to theoretical and experimental particle physics, specifically fundamental symmetries and the dynamics of quarks and leptons. In this course, the second in a twosemester sequence, the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) model, the weak interaction, the electroweak interaction and physics beyond the Standard Model are studied. (Three lecture hours per week.) 3
PHYS 5500 Biophysics Pre-requisite: PHYS 3310, MATH 3020 and CHEM 1200. This graduate level course on biophysics focuses on the physics of biological materials and processes. Topics covered include: bonds, reactions and experimental techniques relevant to fundamental processes in biology; the physics of biological polymers and membranes; the physical basis of biologically generated energy and muscle movement; and the mechanisms of signaling in the nervous system. (Three hours lecture per week.) 3
PHYS 5520 Applied Spectroscopy Pre-requisite: PHYS 3310, PHYS 4060. This course focuses on the study of the principles of atomic and molecular spectra and the design and operation of spectrometers for the study of these spectra. Attention will be given to applications of spectroscopic techniques in areas such as materials processing, communication, and environmental studies. (Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week.) 3
PHYS 5610 Advanced Nanotechnology Pre-requisite: PHYS 5310. This graduate level course in nanotechnology will provide students with an introduction to the physics and chemistry of nanomaterials, including semiconductor quantum dots, metal nanoparticles and carbon nanostructures. Topics covered include: synthesis of nanomaterials; imaging of nanomaterials; theory of electronic and optical properties of nanomaterials; development of technologically advanced devices based on nanomaterials. 3
PHYS 5650 Special Topics Pre-requisite: permission of the instructor. Courses on special topics of current research interest may be offered by experienced faculty. Students with advanced standing in their coursework or those working on related thesis work are expected to take these advanced level courses. 3
PHYS 5700 Physics Graduate Seminar Pre-requisite: permission of the instructor. This course is a study in current topics in research as presented by members of the class. The emphasis is on new and developing research in physics. The students in the course report on topics of their interest. 3
PHYS 5800 Graduate Research (Thesis students: 1 cr per semester, 3 cr max) Prerequisite: permission of research advisor. This course involves instruction on research and performance of research under the mentorship of a member of the faculty. This course is intended to provide students with experience with either theoretical or experimental research. The student will learn to obtain background information on the topic of choice, and understand both the motivation of the research program and the relevancy of the research to its field of physics. The student will become familiar with presenting written and oral reports of research work. 6
PHYS 5900 Thesis Pre-requisite: permission of thesis advisor. This course is taken in the final semester of completing the thesis. Upon completion of the written thesis and comprehensive oral exam, the 3 credits are earned. 3
POLS 2100 Introduction to American Government A study of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of the national government, with emphasis on the changing interpretation of the Constitution. 3
POLS 2110 Introduction to Comparative Politics Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A survey course that examines and compares institutions, cultures, and philosophies in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and other countries. 3
POLS 2115 Introduction to International Politics Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A survey course that examines the interactions among states 3
POLS 2120 State Government Prerequisites: POLS 2100. A study of the relationship of state government to national and local governments, and the problems and operation of state government, particularly state government in North Carolina. 3
POLS 2800 Applied Comparative Civic Engagement Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A review of contemporary social, economic, and public policy alternatives and an examination of the micro and macro level social, economic, and public policy making processes from a local, state, national, and international perspective, employing international service-learning as a tool for addressing social, economic, and public policy issues. 3
POLS 3000 Scope, Method and Writing Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A study of practical application techniques and methods used in collection, analysis, and written presentation of political data. 3
POLS 3020 Major Powers and Asia. Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A survey of the inter-relationship of the global interests of the major powers 3
POLS 3030 Foreign Policy of Major Afro-Asian Nations Prerequisite: POLS 2100. An analytical review of the trends and goals of the foreign policies of Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, India, Indonesia, Japan, and other African and Asian nations. 3
POLS 3040 Major Powers and Africa Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A survey of the inter-relationship of the global interests of the major powers 3
POLS 3120 Governments of the Far East A study of present-day Chinese, Japanese, and Indian governments, with emphasis upon the relation of governmental structure to the historical and philosophical development of these nations. 3
POLS 3130 Nuclear War A study of the relationship between domestic and foreign policy making in terms of nuclear war and weapons, as well as peace theory. 3
POLS 3210 Public Opinion and Propaganda Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A study of the nature, formation, and content of public opinion and the uses and characteristics of propaganda in the modern state. 3
POLS 3310 The American Constitutional System Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A study of judicial interpretation of the Constitution, the separation of governmental powers, federal-state relations, the control of interstate commerce and the role of the federal courts in the development of the concepts of due process and equal protection. 3
POLS 3320 American Political Parties and Pressure Groups Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A study of the purposes, history, and organization of major parties and pressure groups. 3
POLS 3410 Municipal Government Prerequisite: POLS 2120. A study of the history and types of city and town government, problems of metropolitan area governments, and federal-local relations. 3
POLS 3500 Practicum in Political Science An introduction to the theory and practice of the community political process. Students entering the course will spend a minimum of three hours per week in a particular field under the guidance of an instructor. 3
POLS 3510 Black Politics in America Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A study of the history and impact of African-Americans’ participation in government and politics in the United States. 3
POLS 3550 Oil Politics An examination of the politics of oil producing areas of the world. 3
POLS 3560 Media Politics An examination of the relationship of the media and the electoral process. 3
POLS 3600 American Foreign Policy An examination of U.S. foreign policy in the modern era, with emphasis on the process and mechanics of policy formulation and execution, and on economic and military implications in conducting American foreign policy. 3
POLS 3700 The U.S. Congress: People, Power and Politics A study of the U.S. Congress, focusing on both its internal functions and policy processes, with special emphasis on the issues of representation and responsiveness. 3
POLS 3710 The American Presidency: Office and Occupants An examination of presidential leadership and decision making, as well as the sources of and obstacles to presidential influence. Particular attention is paid to the problems and prospects of the modern presidency. 3
POLS 3800 Junior Thesis Independent study and research course under the guidance of the instructor. 3
POLS 3810 Independent Study in Political Science Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A course that allows students to do independent study and research in a specialized area of political science. 3
POLS 3990 Behavioral Research Methods in Political Science Prerequisite: POLS 3000. A course that introduces students to advanced political analysis. 3
POLS 3995 Environmental Politics A review of the history, principles, and issues in American environmental politics, with a focus on both governmental institutions and organizations. 3
POLS 3999 Environmental Politics 3
POLS 4000 Political Economy Prerequisite: POLS 2100 and ECON 2200 or ECON 2300. A course designed to be an advanced level introduction to a range of theoretical and applied concerns regarding political economy. It is an exploration of the fundamental questions about government, policies, and the relationship among global market systems. 3
POLS 4100 Internship in Political Science Prerequisites: POLS 2100, 2120, 3000, 3310. Advanced junior classification or permission of the chair. 12
POLS 4110 Political Theory I Prerequisite: POLS 2100. An examination of the development of political philosophy from Plato to the early eighteenth century, to the advent of the modern state system. 3
POLS 4120 Political Theory II Prerequisite: POLS 2100. A continuation of POLS 4110. An examination of political thought from the post-feudal period to modern times. 3
POLS 4200 Contemporary Black Political Thought Prerequisites: POLS 2100, 3510, and 4110 or 4120. A course to study alternative philosophical and political strategies based on an analysis of various black political movements. 3
POLS 4310 International Organization Prerequisite: 2100 or permission of the instructor. A study of the United Nations, NATO, European ventures into international cooperative organization, and the Organization of American States. 3
POLS 4330 Politics of Developing Nations Prerequisite: 2110 or 2115. A study of complex processes and forces involved with political integration and economic modernization in selected African countries. 3
POLS 4340 Civil Rights: Problems in Administration and Compliance Prerequisite: POLS 3310 or permission of the instructor. An advanced study of public administration and constitutional problems in the context of civil rights laws. 3
POLS 4400 Problems of Contemporary Governments Prerequisites: Advanced standing and a minor or major in the social sciences. A careful study of selected governmental problems facing our nation today. These problems include both domestic and international areas. 3
POLS 4500 Revolution and Ideology in the Third World Prerequisite: POLS 2110 or 2115. A study designed to offer students a representative cross-section of political movements, ideas, and “currents” in the new nations in ferment. 3
POLS 4520 Middle Eastern Politics An analysis of formal power structures of Middle Eastern countries and an examination of political forces impinging upon and undergirding the foreign policy of these nations. 3
POLS 4600 Workshop in International Affairs Prerequisite: POLS 2100 or permission of the instructor. An examination of major problems in international affairs with emphasis upon the factors which generate tensions among nations, focusing on interlocking and interdependent relationships of both larger and smaller nations in world politics. 3
POLS 4880 Special Topics in Political Science Prerequisite: 2100 or permission of the instructor. An examination of special topics in political science. 3
POLS 4990 Senior Honors I Prerequisites: Advanced standing and permission of the instructor or department chairman. Honors course offered for senior political science majors with a minimum 3.0 grade point average. 3
POLS 4995 Senior Honors II Prerequisites: Advanced standing and permission of the instructor or department chairman. Honors course offered for senior political science majors with a minimum 3.0 grade point average. This course offers additional readings beyond Senior Honors I and independent research. 3
PSY 2100 General Psychology (This course is not required for psychology majors.) An introduction to psychological terms, facts and principles designed to aid the student in understanding individual behavior. Behavior is analyzed and interpreted through activities and discussions of such topics as motivation, emotion, perception, learning, and intelligence. 3
PSY 2120 Advanced General Psychology (For psychology majors.) An intensive treatment of topics in general psychology developed specifically for majors. The function of the course is to develop critical understanding and prepare the student to evaluate his or her later reading in the field of psychology. Practical applications of psychology are introduced and a laboratory component is provided. 3
PSY 2400 Introductory Statistics for Students of Psychology Prerequisites: PSY 2100 or 2120, MATH 1100 or 1070. A first course in statistics for students of psychology and other behavioral and social sciences. Assignments, class activities, and lectures are designed to develop a conceptual and analytical understanding of statistics and prepare students for the required quantitative courses. Descriptive statistics, correlation, the concepts of variance and elementary inferential statistics are analyzed. 3
PSY 3100 Abnormal Psychology Prerequisite: PSY 2100 or 2120. An orientation to the Concepts of abnormal behavior with emphasis on the functional disorders of modern civilizations and the significance of social and emotional problems on normal conduct. 3
PSY 3200 Psychological Adjustment Prerequisite: PSY 2100 or 2120. A study of psychological theories and processes with emphasis on the application of psychology in one’s life. 3
PSY 3300 Experimental Psychology Prerequisite: PSY 2400. A systematic overview of experimental design and procedures covering the fields of learning, memory, problem solving, development, psychometrics, environmental and social processes. A lab component is offered. 4
PSY 3310 The Psychology of Human Development and Maturation Prerequisite: PSY 2100 or 2120. An introduction to the study of human growth and development from conception through adulthood and death. 3
PSY 3400 Psychological Measurement Prerequisites PSY 2120, 2400. An introduction to the study of psychological tests, methods, and results in the measurement of intelligence, achievement, and personality. 4
PSY 3600 Social Psychology Prerequisites: PSY 2120, 3300. An examination of how people influence the beliefs and behaviors of others, viewed from the perspectives of the influencer and the object of the influence. Included are such topics as social perception, conformity, attitude change, cognitive consistency, leadership and authority, techniques of data collection and experimental design. 3
PSY 4100 Psychology of Learning Prerequisite PSY 3300. An examination and evaluation of current theories of learning, with special attention given to concepts of classical conditioning and instrumental learning. 3
PSY 4112 Human Motivation Prerequisite: PSY 3300. This course will provide advanced students of psychology with the basic concepts, principles, and theories of the psychology of motivation. The etiology of and methods of instigating and manipulating motivation will be systematically explored. 3
PSY 4120 Psychology of Personality Prerequisite: PSY 3100 or 3200. A focus on the structure and development of the normal personality. Influences of childhood experiences upon personality and the significance of emotional development, integration, measurement of traits and personality types will be systematically examined. 3
PSY 4121 Adolescent Psychology Prerequisite: PSY 2100 or 2120. An examination of psychological theories and research methods and findings regarding the intellectual, emotional, perceptual and social development of the adolescent. Special coping or adjustment difficulties of the adolescent will be an integral part of the course. 3
PSY 4210 Undergraduate Internship Prerequisites PSY 2120, 2400, 3300 and nine additional hours of psychology. Direction and concentration are arranged by the instructor of record. For mature students with exible schedules and a demonstrated commitment for community serviceresearch. 3
PSY 4310 Applied Industrial and Organizational Psychology Prerequisite: PSY 2120. The study of efficient and effective ways to improve industrial and organizational performance via personnel selection, classification, isolating motivational factors, engineering, and man machine interface. 3
PSY 4410 Intermediate Statistics for Students of Psychology Prerequisite PSY 2400 A study of statistical concepts, principles and procedures in the areas of basic descriptive statistics and inferential statistics including measures of central tendency, variability, probability, and mathematical distributions, hypothesis testing, chi-square, analysis of variance and multiple correlation. 3
PSY 4500 Physiological Psychology Prerequisite: PSY 2120. A study of physiological mechanisms which underlie behavior adjustments. Special attention is paid to the receptors, neural and effecter mechanisms involved in perception, learning, and emotional behavior. 3
PSY 4900 Undergraduate Thesis Prerequisites PSY 4110 and permission of the department. Opportunities will be provided for the students to develop and write a supervised major research paper in any area of psychology that is agreed upon by the student and the advisor. The major objectives of the course are to assure that students are able to do adequate research, use qualitative tools and instruments in the field, and develop and defend a final paper in a format stipulated by the instructor. 3
PSY 4910 Undergraduate Honors Seminar Prerequisites: Junior or senior status and at least a 3.0 GPA. This course is designed for honors or high achieving majors to discuss, test, and explore their research interests. 1
PSY 4920 Senior Seminar Prerequisite senior status. Students will focus on relevant issues and problems in psychology. Preparation for graduate and professional schools and the requirements for careers in psychology and related disciplines will be explored. 1
RECR 1000 Introduction to Recreation An introduction to the parks and recreation field, with emphasis upon understanding the conceptual foundations of play, recreation, and leisure for all populations and settings. An overview of career opportunities in the profession, and in the professional organizations and agencies providing leisure services. 3
RECR 2000 Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society An introduction to the parks and recreation field with emphasis upon understanding the conceptual foundations of play, recreation and leisure for all populations and settings. 3
RECR 2120 Recreation Leadership Prerequisite: RECR 1000. An analysis of activities, techniques, principles, and practices of leadership in recreation, park resources, and leisure service agencies; process of activity leadership in conjunction with development of skills and knowledge in activity areas. 3
RECR 2500 Special Topics in Physical Education, Sport and Recreation An examination of current issues in physical education, sports and recreation agencies, facilities and settings. Topics may vary with the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit if topics differ. 3
RECR 3100 Organization and Administration of Competitive Sports Prerequisites: RECR 1000 and 2120. An introduction to the organization and administration of informal, intramural, extramural and club sports competitions, with emphasis upon tournament design, personnel training and management, sport facility development, public and human relations, legal liability, and marketing techniques. 3
RECR 3120 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Prerequisite: RECR 1000. A survey of key concepts and operational definitions; theoretical constructs; therapeutic recreation processes and models; etiology of illness and disability conditions; medical and psychiatric terminology. This course is three lecture hours with two laboratory hours per week. 3
RECR 3230 Camping and Outdoor Recreation Prerequisites: RECR 1000 and 2120. An examination of the leadership and supervision of counselors in camping and outdoor recreation settings, with emphasis on camp administration and operation. 3
RECR 3245 Practicum in Parks and Recreation Prerequisites: RECR 1000, 2120, 3100, and 3120. A study of professional practice. Designed to provide directed practicum experiences in a park and recreation agency under the supervision of a faculty advisor and an approved agency supervisor. Opportunities provided for students to develop knowledge, values, and initial practice skills appropriate for entry-level practice in parks and recreation agencies. 3
RECR 3250 Non-Clinical Application of Therapeutic Recreation Prerequisites: RECR 1000, 3120, or consent of instructor. A study of philosophical and basic concepts of special recreations in transitional treatment and community- based settings. Examines the nature and etiology of varied physically disabling conditions, programming standards; strategies for integration and activities to accommodate the disabled consumer. 3
RECR 3900 Management of Exercise, Sport, and Recreation Facilities Prerequisites: RECR 1000, 2120, and 3120. A study of the principles and practices of operating parks and recreation service delivery areas. Emphasis placed on management of playgrounds, community centers, swimming pools, sports centers, and other related facilities with particular attention to the role of the parks and/or recreation supervisor. 3
RECR 4100 Supervision Management 3
RECR 4140 Program Design and Evaluation in Therapeutic Recreation Prerequisite: RECR 3120 or consent of the instructor. A study of philosophical concepts underlying therapeutic recreation service along a continuum of care. System designed for evaluation of habilitation/rehabilitation programs using systems terminology. Activity and task analysis assessment, documentation in therapeutic recreation, and summative and formative evaluation concerns are addressed. 3
RECR 4150 Recreation and Leisure Services Programming Prerequisite: RECR 1000 or consent of the instructor. An analysis of concepts and principles of recreation and leisure services program development, with attention to examination of recreation activity taxonomies, methods of assessing needs, the process of program planning, and developments, evaluation, and promotion of a master program plan. 3
RECR 4270 Advanced Concepts in Recreation and Leisure Studies Prerequisite: RECR 1000. A study and critical analysis of selected theories and concepts which influence the development of leisure behavior and the delivery of recreation services. Analysis of pertinent research, including understanding the research process. 3
RECR 4600 Organization and Administration of Parks, Recreation and Leisure Service Agenices Prerequisites: RECR 1000, 2120, 4100, or consent of instructor. A study of administrative processes, the internal organization of the recreation/parks department board and executive relationships, legal foundations and legal liability considerations, risk management components, public relations, and marketing from the administration perspective. 3
RECR 4610 finance in Parks, Recreation and Leisure Service Agencies Prerequisites: RECR 1000, 4100, 4610, or consent of instructor. A study of recreation and park administration; sources of finance for operating and capital expenditures; revenue producing activities; financial planning, budgeting, expenditure policies and procedures, auditing process, and planning for recreation and leisure services. 3
RECR 4630 Internship in Parks and Recreation Prerequisite: Permission by faculty advisor or recreation faculty. An examination of professional practice. Designed to individually assign the student to a ten- to twelve-week program in an approved public, private, or health care agency. Internship consists of a full-time placement for a minimum of 400 clock hours. 6
RECR 4800 Independent Study Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Independent reading and research for upper level undergraduate student physical education and recreation majors under faculty supervision. This is an opportunity for advanced study in a special area in physical education and/or recreation. 3
RECR 4900 Computer Applications 3
SOCI 2000 Society and Human Behavior The study of society and cultural organization with emphasis on diversity in human behavior. A focus on population growth and behavioral change, socialization into the environment through family organization, and variations in human behavior produced by divergent cultural values 3
SOCI 2100 Principles of Sociology The first course in sociology introduces students to the concepts and fields of sociology and briefly examines social organization, culture and personality. 3
SOCI 2200 Cultural Anthropology Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. Anthropological study of culture, society and human behavior with emphasis on theory and ethnography. 3
SOCI 2300 Economy and Society Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. An examination of the sources, nature, extent and consequences of change in the social system. 3
SOCI 2400 Social Psychology Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. A study of the development of human nature and personality through the socialization process and other processes of social interaction. 3
SOCI 2500 Marriage and the Family Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000, except for junior and senior non-majors. The scientific study of cross-cultural development and organization of the institutions of marriage and family. 3
SOCI 3000 Introduction to Social Gerontology Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. An examination of the social and cultural dimensions of the aging process and its impact on the individual and society. Also covered will be the demographic effect of aging on the family, work, health, recreation, religious, education and political systems. 3
SOCI 3200 The Development of Sociological Theory Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000 or permission of the instructor. A systematic study of the major sociological theorists from Comte to the present. Emphasis is placed on the development of a conceptual framework basic to the understanding of sociological materials and the contributions of various writers to the field. 3
SOCI 3210 Social Differentiation and Inequality Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. The study of social stratification and the distribution of power, wealth, and prestige within societies. Emphasis will be placed on the economic, political, and cultural forces that produce inequality; and the consequences of inequality on society and the individual. 3
SOCI 3220 American Minority Groups Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. Focus on the number, size, initial contact with America, and social characteristics of major American minority groups. Emphasis on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and age as major sources of minority status. Emphasis is on the analysis of major problems of intergroup relations using techniques of small -area demographic analysis. 3
SOCI 3300 Criminology Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. This course is a study of the social nature of criminal and delinquent behavior with reference to theories of causation, and methods of prevention and treatment. 3
SOCI 3600 Sociological Statistics A study of basic statistical concepts such as measures of central tendency and dispersion, correlation, sampling, and probability. 3
SOCI 3700 Sociological Research Prerequisite: SOCI 3600. A study of various research designs: the use of such research techniques as sampling, developing questionnaires, conducting interviews, techniques of computer programming, data collection, data entry, data analysis, and elementary and advanced statistics. 4
SOCI 4040 Sociology of Religion Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. A sociological approach to religion as a social institution, with emphasis on the relationship between religion, social structure, social organization and social change. 3
SOCI 4210 Demography Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. This course provides an introduction to major demographic processes, concepts and trends. The essential focus on the United States and an understanding of the interrelatedness of world trends. The course provides an experience with small area analysis of urban population and geographic information system technology. 3
SOCI 4220 Industrial Sociology Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. This course will review of the literature and sociological concepts in the analysis of work in industrial and non-industrial societies. 3
SOCI 4250 Society and Law A study of basic law as it pertains to issues and problems met by the social worker. The course will prepare the social worker to recognize and question possible violations of client rights. Law will be studied as an available resource to aid clients in the helping process. 3
SOCI 4310 Formal Organization Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. A study of the structure and dynamic processes of human society. Stress is laid on the sources of similarity and divergence in the structuring and functioning of rural and urban society. 3
SOCI 4320 The Sociology of Urban Life Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. An analysis of the major characteristics of urban life and urbanization. 3
SOCI 4330 Collective Behavior and Social Movements Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. A study of noninstitutionalized behavior such as riots, panics, fads, rumors, protests, disasters, and social movements. Emphasis will be placed on the social structured origins and consequences of collective behavior. 3
SOCI 4500 The Sociology of Education Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. The course is designed to analyze education as a social institution. The essential focus is on the function of the educational institution in relation to stability, integration, social stratification, social mobility and status differences within society. 3
SOCI 4520 Medical Sociology Prerequisite: SOCI 2400. An examination of the influence of socio-cultural factors on the nature, conception, and treatment of disease and illness; the institutionalization of the healing professions; and the impact of the doctor-patient relationship. 3
SOCI 4600 Introduction to Statistics For Social Workers 3
SOCI 4900 Independent Study in Sociology Prerequisite: SOCI 2100 or SOCI 2000. Specialized, critical in-depth study arranged between the instructor and the student, with permission of the departmental chairperson. Designed to offer specialized work for majors leading to the graduate’s enhanced professional skills in sociological techniques through an individually tailored program. 3
SOCI SCI Requirement 2 3
SOCW 2500 Social Work as a Profession This course is one of the two prerequisites to all subsequent social work courses and is designed to provide an introduction to the development, fields and knowledge and value base of the social work profession and the general principles underlying the process of giving and receiving help. 3
SOCW 3410 Social Welfare as an Institution This course is a prerequisite to all subsequent social work courses. The course is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to the broad framework of social welfare activities and to social work as a profession. Students are introduced to the philosophy, values and methods of the social welfare system. 3
SOCW 3420 Social Policy and Community Resources This course examines the processes and issues associated with decision-making within the social welfare sector. The essential focus of the course is on various conceptual approaches to the solution of human problems within a market economy resulting from the unequal distribution of resources. 3
SOCW 3500 Human Behavior and the Social Environment This course is an examination of bio-psycho-social determinants of behavior at each stage of the life course. The essential focus is upon adaptive and maladaptive behavior that may occur at the varying life course stages and levels of environmental influence on behavior. 3
SOCW 3600 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II Prerequisites: SOCW 2500, 3410 and 3500. This course employs systems theory and social entities such as culture, communities, and formal organizations. Groups and families are conceptualized as macro, mezzo, and micro systems that form the social environment of the individual. The course is based on the social work principle that human behavior and problems are determined by interaction between individuals and macro, mezzo and micro systems by which they are surrounded. 3
SOCW 3610 Interventive Methods in the Helping Professions Prerequisites: SOCW 2500, 3410, 3420, 3600. An introduction to the practice methods component of the social work concentration. The knowledge, skills and value orientations acquired serve as a basis for the field placement practicum. The course focuses upon the nature of social work as a field of study and its methods of intervention. The student is expected to develop a beginning conceptualization of the generic knowledge, values and skills essential to the practice of social work. Professions II 3
SOCW 3620 Interventive Methods in the Helping Professions II Prerequisites: SOCW 2500, 3410, 3420, 3600, 3610. A continuation of SOCW 3610. This course, which is taken simultaneously with SOCW 4110, serves as a technical laboratory for the integration and application of theory and practice for planned change. 3
SOCW 3700 Human Diversity and Social Work Practice Prerequisites: SOCW 3600. This course aims to provide students with knowledge and skills for social work practice with disadvantaged and oppressed people. Such people in the United States typically include people of color, women, people with disabilities, gay, and lesbian people, and poor people. This course will also utilize ethnographic methods, enhance student’s capacity to understand diversity. Furthermore, the class will examine the internal adaptive strengths and external assets of disadvantaged and oppressed people and how these capabilities can be used in effective social work practice. Students should leave leave this course with a better understanding not only of themselves, but also diverse groups and human behavior in the social environment 3
SOCW 3950 Social Work and Elderly Prerequisites: SOCW 2500. Introduction to aging and geriatrics. Emphasis is placed on aging and demographic data; problems of aging; treatment and management of facilities for the aging; analysis of selected social factors and their impact on older persons. 3
SOCW 4000 Child Welfare Prerequisites: SOCW 2500, SOCW 3410: This course is designed to introduce students to the field and practice of child welfare. The primary focus is upon the history, conceptual base, and practice skills essential to the field. Child welfare services are viewed as helping to support and stabilize families, and where this in not possible, provide healthy placements for children through foster care and adoption. The course is approved by the State Division of Social Services the North Carolina Child Welfare Education Collaborative. 3
SOCW 4110 Field Experience and Practice I Prerequisites SOCW 2500, 3410, 3420, 3600, 3610, 3620. The two segments of this course provide a structured milieu through which the social work practice theory acquired in the classroom is applied to real people and problems. The student, via this practice experience, is expected to begin to take on the adult role of the professional social worker. The process of socialization into this adult role is expected to cause the student to experience considerable growth as a person and as a professional social worker. The student is engaged in the process of assessing and integrating knowledge, values and ethics germane to the practice of social work. 5
SOCW 4120 field Experience and Practice II Prerequisites SOCW 2500, 3410, 3420, 3600, 3610, 3620. The two segments of this course provide a structured milieu through which the social work practice theory acquired in the classroom is applied to real people and problems. The student, via this practice experience, is expected to begin to take on the adult role of the professional social worker. The process of socialization into this adult role is expected to cause the student to experience considerable growth as a person and as a professional social worker. The student is engaged in the process of assessing and integrating knowledge, values and ethics germane to the practice of social work. 5
SOCW 4300 Applied Research in Social Work Prerequisites: SOCI 4600 Sociological Statistics and SOCI 4700 Sociological Research or basic statistics and research methods course in other disciplines. This course provides students an opportunity to build upon and sharpen the knowledge and skills acquired in lower level research methods courses. As an upper-level course, it is structured as a classroom-based, supervised practicum in the design and implementation of research focused on issues relevant to social work practice. Classroom activities involve the analysis of topics germane to the implementation of social research, ethical guidelines, statistical techniques, and methodological designs. Out-of-class activities focus on the application of research strategies to problems and issues associated with the local community’s social services delivery with a specific focus on organizational analysis and outcome measures. 3
SOCW 4310 Introductory Statistics for Social Workers Prerequisites: SOCW 4300. The Primary aims of this course are to provide students with a firm foundation in descriptive statistics, univariate inferential statistics, analysis of variance, and multiple regression. The course focuses upon the application of these basic statistical concepts to issues related to social work theory and practice. 3
SOCW 4400 Evaluative Methods in Social Work Practice Prerequisites: SOCI 4600, SOCW 2500, 3410, 3420, 3500, 3600, 3610. This course provides “hands-on” experiences with evaluating the outcomes of social work practice. Students apply basic research and statistical methods to the analysis of practice outcomes and to the evaluation of their own experiences. 3
SOCW 4410 Senior Seminar in Social Work Prerequisites: SOCI 4600, SOCW 2500, 3410, 3420, 3500, 3600, 3610, 4400. This course provides a task force approach to evaluation of social work practice with a focus on macro systems while demonstrating the synergy between all levels of systems 3
SPAN 1000 Introduction to Contemporary Spanish Culture, Civilization, and Language A course designed for the non-major who wants to understand modern Spain and use a few practical expressions. The major emphasis is on cultural distinction and patterns of daily living in Spain. Taught entirely in English. 3
SPAN 1020 Introduction to Contemporary Latin American Culture, Civilization, and Language A course designed for the non-major who wants to understand modern Latin America and to learn a few practical Spanish expressions. The major emphasis is on the cultural distinction and patterns of daily living in the Latin American republics. Taught entirely in English. 3
SPAN 1040 Basic Conversational Spanish A strictly conversational course for beginners. Emphasis on sentences and vocabulary related to everyday situations. 2
SPAN 1050 Basic Conversational Spanish A strictly conversational course for beginners. Emphasis on sentences and vocabulary related to everyday situations. 2
SPAN 1150 Elementary Spanish I An introduction to the basics of the Spanish language. Fundamentals of pronunciation, structure and vocabulary prepare the student to carry on simple conversations in everyday, concrete situations. The four communication skills 3
SPAN 1151 Elementary Spanish II Prerequisite: SPAN 1150 or the equivalent. The second of a two-semester proficiency-based sequence 3
SPAN 1152 Elementary Spanish III Prerequisite: SPAN 1151 or the equivalent. The third of a three-semester proficiency-based sequence 3
SPAN 2010 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature before 1898 in English Translation A historical and critical study of selected masterpieces of Spanish literature in English translation. Designed to acquaint the student lacking Spanish reading skills with the literary resources of the language. No knowledge of Spanish needed. 3
SPAN 2020 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature after 1989 in English Translation Representative works from contemporary Spanish literature studied in English translation. No knowledge of Spanish needed. 3
SPAN 2100 Intermediate Spanish I Prerequisite: SPAN 1151 or equivalent. Development of skills in spoken and written Spanish with attention to fundamental structures. Listening to authentic language samples. Reading of short journalistic and/or literary texts. 3
SPAN 2110 Spanish for Health Professions Practical introduction to the vocabulary and situations encountered by doctors, nurses and other health professionals. Emphasis on the skills of speaking and listening. 3
SPAN 2120 Technical and Commercial Spanish Practical business vocabulary and terminology. Emphasis on everyday spoken and written Spanish. Reading and discussions of cultural differences affecting international relations. 3
SPAN 2140 Spanish for Law Enforcement Practical introduction to vocabulary and situations encountered in the criminal justice system. Emphasis on the skills of speaking and listening. 3
SPAN 2150 Hispanic Literature in Translation Representative works of Spain and/or Latin-America. May include poetry, prose and drama. Taught in English. 3
SPAN 2200 Intermediate Spanish II Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent. Development of skills in spoken and written Spanish with attention to fundamental structures. Listening to authentic language samples. Readings of short journalistic and/or literary texts. 3
SPAN 2300 Introduction to Hispanic Literature Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or equivalent. Guided reading of literary texts illustrating a variety of genres, periods and movements. Composition and discussion in Spanish. 3
SPAN 3080 Syntax and Composition Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or equivalent. Progressive development of writing skills. Stress on fundamental grammatical, syntactical and lexical concepts. Integration of writing and other skills. 3
SPAN 3100 Oral and Written Expression I Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or permission of Department. Practical speaking and listening. Emphasis on broadened vocabulary, use of idioms, and communication strategies in both spoken and written expressions. 3
SPAN 3110 Spanish Culture and Civilization Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or permission of Department. A survey of Spanish culture. The development of Spanish history, thought, art and literature is stressed. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 3120 Latin American Culture and Civilization Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or permission of Department. A survey of Latin American culture. The development of Latin American history, thought, art and literature is presented. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 3210 Survey of Spanish Literature from Beginning to 1700 Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or permission of Department. Examination of the main periods, trends, genres and most representative works of Spanish peninsular literature from its beginning to the end of the Golden Age. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 3220 Survey of Spanish Literature Since 1700 Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or permission of Department. Examination of the main periods, trends, genres and most representative works of Spanish peninsular literature from the early nineteenth century to the Spanish post- Civil War period. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 3300 Introduction to African-Hispanic Literature Prerequisite: SPAN 2200 or permission of Department. Study of the African element as an important theme in modern Spanish American literature in selected plays, poems and stories by Hispanics of African ancestry. Given in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4110 Advanced Grammar and Composition Prerequisite: SPAN 3080 or permission of Department. Integration of the formal aspects of language within the context of written expression. Diverse written assignments. 3
SPAN 4200 Oral and Written Expression II Prerequisite: SPAN 3100 or permission of Department. Intensive practice in the spoken and written language. Emphasis on systematic study and use of new vocabulary through oral reports and class discussions based on contemporary life and topics of interest. 3
SPAN 4210 Survey of Latin-American Literature I Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or permission of Department. A survey of writers and movements from the conquest to modernism. Includes works by Hispanics of African ancestry, indigenous, mestizo and women writers. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4220 Survey of Latin-American Literature II Prerequisite: SPAN 2300 or permission of Department. Continuation of the survey from modernism to the contemporary period. Includes works by Hispanics of African ancestry, indigenous, mestizo and women writers. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4230 Special Topics Prerequisite: SPAN 2300, 3110 or permission of Department. Focused study on a topic or theme related to Hispanic literature and/or culture; such as Literature of the Mexican Revolution, Chicano Literature, Feminist Literature, etc. May be taken two times for credit each time. 3
SPAN 4300 Literature of the Golden Age I A study of Cervantes and his period with analytical readings of Don Quixote and of selected novellas ejemplares. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4320 Literature of the Golden Age II The development of the Spanish drama with critical readings of selected plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderon, Rojas Zorilla, and Alarcon. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4400 Contemporary Literature A study of the most important trends from the Generation of 1898 to the present day. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4510 The Latin American Novel A study of the development of the novelistic genre in Latin America, with special emphasis of the novel of social protest. Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4520 Latin American Poetry The poetic movements of Latin America, with emphasis on Modernism and African-Cuban poetry Conducted in Spanish. 3
SPAN 4600 Techniques of Translation I Techniques of translation studied through comparative language patterns. Two-way translation using various types of written prose is emphasized and oral translation of the spoken language is introduced. 3
SPAN 4610 Techniques of Translation II Techniques of translation studied through comparative language patterns. Two-way translation using various types of written prose is emphasized and oral translation of the spoken language is introduced. 3
SPAN 4700 Study Abroad Programs Courses completed with a program or university in a Spanish-speaking country. 9
SPAN 4800 Senior Seminar in Hispanic Studies Advanced seminar treating a special topic in Hispanic literature and/or culture chosen by the instructor. May be designed around topics such as Women Writers, Literature of Revolution, Testimonial Literature, Postmodern fiction, Magic Realism, the Fantastic, film. Required of majors. 3
SPAN 4900 Independent Study Prerequisite: Permission of the Department. Individual work under the direction of a faculty member who reviews and approves the topic of study and determines the means of evaluation. May be taken two times for credit each time. 3
SPAN 5000 Spanish: A Reading Knowledge Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Designed to assist graduate students in preparing for the foreign language examination. Successful completion of the course fulfills the graduate foreign language requirement. 0

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