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Institute Courses

Planning and Intervention for Gangs, Hate, and Terrorist Groups in Rural Jails and Prisons



For More Information
about MGT 401 Planning and Intervention for Gangs, Hate, and Terrorist Groups in Rural Jails and Prisons course content, registration and other course offerings contact:

Harry Harris at 919-530-6928 hharris@nccu.edu  

or

M. Chris Herring at 919-530-5206 mherriing@nccu.edu

at NCCU’s Institute for Homeland Security & Workforce Development.


*


MGT 401 was created by North Carolina Central University in partnership with the Rural Domestic Preparedness Consortium at Eastern Kentucky University.

For information about requesting the course or how to obtain a DHS Foreign National Visitor Request Form contact Michelle Day: Michelle.Day@eku.edu • (606) 274-0262

MGT 401 Planning and Intervention for Gangs, Hate, and Terrorist Groups in Rural Jails and Prisons focuses on rural correctional facilities as unique environments for threat group recruitment and radicalization. The course provides valuable information about information sharing with fusion centers and helps participants develop policies for utilizing Suspicious Activity Reports in accordance with the Department of Homeland Security’s Information Sharing Initiative.

Two case studies and a tabletop exercise embedded in the course are designed to emphasize to students the urgency of threat group recruitment in rural jails and prisons, to illustrate the mechanisms by which recruitment and radicalization occur, and to explore the roles of various agencies in gathering and sharing operational information.

This tuition-free course is targeted toward rural detention officers, jailors, correction officers, public safety and law enforcement officers, fusion center intelligence analysts, as well as government officials who are engaged with corrections.

Topics covered include but are not limited to:

  • Gang, hate group, and terrorist group operations in rural jails and prisons;
  • Threat group recruitment and radicalization
  • The role of fusion centers, and the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative
  • Policy creation for radicalization and recruitment in rural jails and prisons

*Please note all foreign nationals need to complete a Department of Homeland Security Foreign National Visitor Request Form in order to attend this course.

For more information on MGT 401 Planning and Intervention for Gangs, Hate, and Terrorist Groups in Rural Jails and Prisons, go to

https://www.ruraltraining.org/training/courses/mgt-405/.

To request this or any RDPC training, call (877) 855-7372 or complete the training request form at

https://www.ruraltraining.org/training/request/.

For a complete list of courses and other information regarding the RDPC, please visit www.ruraltraining.org, or email info@ruraltraining.org . To register for online training, go to http://www.ruraltraining.org/training/online.

 

 

 

Mobilizing Faith-Based Community Organizations in Preparing for Disaster



For More Information
about the Mobilizing Faith-based Community Organizations in Preparing for Disaster course content and other course offerings contact:

M. Chris Herring 919-530-5206 mherring@nccu.edu
at NCCU’s Institute for Homeland Security & Workforce Development.

This course was created by North Carolina Central University in partnership with the Rural Domestic Preparedness Consortium at Eastern Kentucky University.

*  Three pilot courses have been delivered and  this course is in the final phase of certification and formal approval.




Mobilizing Faith-based Community Organizations in Preparing for Disaster

addresses the gaps in emergency preparedness that often exist in low-income, marginalized communities by utilizing the assets of faith-based community organizations as trusted institutions in their communities.  The course: 1) trains FBCO leaders in how to prepare their members and facilities for disaster, 2) Trains emergency management personnel on the value of FBCOs in disaster preparedness, and 3) Encourages partnerships between faith community leaders and local emergency management.

The Mobilizing Faith-based Community Organizations course emphasizes grassroots mobilization as a means of engaging all faith communities, thereby reaching those marginalized communities most vulnerable to disaster.

At the conclusion of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the assets and leadership structure of the disaster management community;
  • Identify and address challenges in communication between FBCOs and emergency planners;
  • Utilize the assets of the FBCOs and other non-profit, religious and/or charitable groups in partnership with local emergency management officials;
  • List components that make up a faith-based community organization recovery plan; and
  • Create an agreement between an FBCO and emergency management agency reflecting a formalized partnership.

For more information on MGT 405 Mobilizing Faith-Based Community Organizations in Preparing for Disaster, go to

https://www.ruraltraining.org/training/courses/mgt-405/.

To request this or any RDPC training, call (877) 855-7372 or complete the training request form at

https://www.ruraltraining.org/training/request/.

For a complete list of courses and other information regarding the RDPC, please visit www.ruraltraining.org, or email info@ruraltraining.org  . To register for online training, go to http://www.ruraltraining.org/training/online.

Community Threat Group Identification and Assessment for Rural Law Enforcement Officers

Community Threat Group Identification, Assessment, and Information Reporting for Rural Law Enforcement Officers is an eight-hour course that is designed for law enforcement staff at all levels as well as government officials who are engaged in law enforcement.  It consists of five instructor-led modules.  The course introduces students to known community threat groups (CTG) and CTG networks in the United States, particularly in rural areas. 
Students are provided with identifiers that indicate possible CTG convergence activities in rural communities and are exposed to both artifactual and behavioral identifiers that may be used to determine the existence of possible threats.  Various gangs are explored, including signs, symbols and other iconography that they adopt.  Additionally, gang convergence will also be explored and along with how gangs come together with terrorist groups and other gangs for purposes of building criminal enterprises and in furtherance of criminal activities.  Hate, domestic and international terrorist groups that operate in rural areas are identified, classified and assessed for the likelihood of threat group convergence.  Students will gain an understanding of the possibilities and implications for hate group, domestic and international terrorist activity in rural communities.  Finally, after receiving all of the above-mentioned information, students will engage in activities involving the Suspicious Activity Report (SAR).  SAR is a model of a Department of Homeland Security-supported system for documenting suspicious activity and reporting it to the appropriate agencies. 
The course will give students a clearer understanding of gaps in information gathering, skills for differentiating actionable from erroneous information and an approach for sharing actionable information among law enforcement, corrections and other pertinent state and federal agencies, and fusion centers. 
The goals of the course are for participants, upon completion, to be able to:

  • Identify the criminal activities of community threat groups (CTG) and networks that impact rural communities across the country;
  • Classify domestic and international community threat groups on the basis of institutionalization, sophistication and likelihood for convergence; and
  • Use a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) to report suspicious activity carried out by CTGs in and around rural communities.
For more information regarding this course, please contact Renee Porter at (919) 530-6925 or at rporter@nccu.edu.